Abacavir, Lamivudine, and Zidovudine

Your pharmacist will give you a Warning Card each time you receive your medication. The Warning Card lists the symptoms mentioned above to make it easy for you and the people around you to recognize if you are having an allergic reaction. Be sure to carry this Warning Card with you at all times.

Some people may be more likely to have an allergic reaction to abacavir, based on their heredity or genetic make-up. Your doctor may order a genetic lab test prior to starting abacavir, lamivudine, and zidovudine to determine if you are more likely to have an allergic reaction to abacavir. Tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to abacavir or any other medications that contain abacavir or if you know that you have that particular genetic makeup. If your doctor tells you to stop taking abacavir, lamivudine, and zidovudine because you had an allergic reaction, never take abacavir, lamivudine, and zidovudine or a medication containing abacavir again. If you stop taking abacavir, lamivudine, and zidovudine for any other reason, including missing several doses in a row or running out of medication, do not start taking it again without first talking to your doctor. Restarting abacavir, lamivudine, and zidovudine increases your risk of experiencing an allergic reaction, even if you never had a reaction to it before. You will need to be around people who can provide or call for emergency medical care, if needed, when you restart this medication.

Abacavir, lamivudine, and zidovudine may stop your body from making enough blood cells. Tell your doctor if you have or have ever had a low number of any type of blood cells or any blood disorders such as anemia or bone marrow problems. If you experience any of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately: unusual bleeding or bruising; shortness of breath; pale skin; fever, sore throat, chills, and other signs of infection; or unusual tiredness or weakness.

Abacavir, lamivudine, and zidovudine may cause muscle disorders. Tell your doctor if you have or have ever had any muscular disease or swelling of the muscles. If you experience muscle pain or weakness, call your doctor immediately.

Abacavir, lamivudine, and zidovudine may cause life-threatening damage to the liver and a potentially life-threatening condition called lactic acidosis (buildup of lactic acid in the blood). Tell your doctor if you have or have ever had liver disease. If you have liver disease your doctor will probably tell you not to take abacavir, lamivudine, and zidovudine. You may also be at an increased risk of developing lactic acidosis if you are female, very overweight, or have been taking nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor medications like abacavir, lamivudine, and zidovudine for a long time. If you experience any of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately or get emergency medical treatment: nausea, vomiting, pain in the upper right part of your stomach, loss of appetite, flu-like symptoms, extreme tiredness, unusual bleeding or bruising, weakness, dizziness, lightheadedness, fast or irregular heartbeat, trouble breathing, dark yellow or brown urine, light-colored bowel movements, yellowing of the skin or eyes, feeling cold, especially in the arms or legs, or muscle pain that is different than any muscle pain you usually experience.

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Abacavir, lamivudine, and zidovudine should not be used to treat hepatitis B virus infection (HBV; an ongoing liver infection). Tell your doctor if you have or think you may have HBV. Your doctor may test you to see if you have HBV before you begin your treatment with abacavir, lamivudine, and zidovudine. If you have HBV and you take abacavir, lamivudine, and zidovudine, your condition may suddenly worsen when you stop taking this medication. Your doctor will examine you and order lab tests regularly for several months after you stop taking this medication to see if your HBV has worsened.

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Your doctor or pharmacist will give you the manufacturer’s patient information sheet (Medication Guide) when you begin treatment with abacavir, lamivudine, and zidovudine and each time you refill your prescription. Read the information carefully and ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions. You can also visit the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) website (http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/DrugSafety/ucm085729.htm) to obtain the Medication Guide.

Talk to your doctor about the risks of taking abacavir, lamivudine, and zidovudine.

🔔 Why is this medication prescribed?

The combination of abacavir, lamivudine and zidovudine is used alone or along with other medications to treat human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Abacavir, lamivudine and zidovudine are in a class of medications called nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs). They work by decreasing the amount of HIV in the blood. Although the combination of abacavir, lamivudine and zidovudine does not cure HIV, it may decrease your chance of developing acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and HIV-related illnesses such as serious infections or cancer. Taking these medications along with practicing safer sex and making other lifestyle changes may decrease the risk of transmitting (spreading) the HIV virus to other people.

🔔 How should this medicine be used?

The combination of abacavir, lamivudine, and zidovudine comes as a tablet to take by mouth. It is usually taken with or without food two times a day. Take abacavir, lamivudine, and zidovudine at around the same times every day. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Take abacavir, lamivudine, and zidovudine exactly as directed. Do not take more or less of it or take it more often than prescribed by your doctor.

Abacavir, lamivudine, and zidovudine helps to control HIV infection but does not cure it. Continue to take abacavir, lamivudine, and zidovudine even if you feel well. Do not stop taking abacavir, lamivudine, and zidovudine without talking to your doctor. If you stop taking abacavir, lamivudine, and zidovudine or skip doses, your condition may become more difficult to treat or you could have an allergic reaction when restarting the medication (See Important Warning section).

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🔔 Other uses for this medicine

This medication may be prescribed for other uses; ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.