The ADGRG1 gene, also known as adhesion G protein-coupled receptor G1, is a genetic receptor found within the cortex of neurons. It regulates the growth and adhesion of cells and is involved in various genetic conditions and diseases.

Scientific articles and references related to the ADGRG1 gene can be found on databases such as PubMed and OMIM. These resources provide information on the genetic changes and variants of the gene, as well as their implications for health and genetic conditions.

One specific condition associated with the ADGRG1 gene is polymicrogyria, a disorder characterized by abnormal folding of the cortex. Tests and additional information on this condition and other related genetic diseases can be found in the PubMed catalog and the OMIM database.

The ADGRG1 gene is considered an orphan receptor, meaning its ligands and functions are still being studied. However, its involvement in cell adhesion and growth suggests its importance in various biological processes.

Other names for the ADGRG1 gene include GPR56, LPHN1, and CELR3. These names can be useful when searching for additional information or resources on the gene.

The ADGRG1 gene, also known as the adhesion G protein-coupled receptor G1 gene, regulates the growth and folding of neurons in the cortex. Genetic changes within this gene can lead to various health conditions.

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One health condition related to genetic changes in the ADGRG1 gene is polymicrogyria. Polymicrogyria is a condition in which the cortex of the brain has too many folds. This can result in developmental problems and neurological issues.

Genetic testing can be performed to identify changes in the ADGRG1 gene. There are various resources available for this testing, including databases such as OMIM and PubMed. These databases list scientific articles, references, and other related information on genetic changes in the ADGRG1 gene.

The ADGRG1 gene is an orphan receptor, meaning it does not have any known ligands. However, it is believed to play a role in cell adhesion and signaling processes. Additional research is ongoing to further understand the functions and implications of genetic changes in this gene.

For individuals with health conditions related to genetic changes in the ADGRG1 gene, there may be specific treatments or management strategies available. It is important to consult with a healthcare professional for personalized advice and guidance.

Resources for Health Conditions Related to ADGRG1 Gene Changes
Resource Description
OMIM A comprehensive catalog of genetic diseases and their associated genes
PubMed A database of scientific articles and references

By utilizing the information available in these resources, healthcare professionals can stay updated on the latest research and findings related to health conditions associated with genetic changes in the ADGRG1 gene.

Polymicrogyria

Polymicrogyria is a condition characterized by abnormal development of the brain’s outer surface. The condition is listed under various names, such as PMG, polymicrogyria spectrum disorder, and bilateral frontoparietal polymicrogyria. It is a rare abnormality that affects the development of the cortex, the outer layer of the brain associated with higher level cognitive functions.

See also  RAB3GAP1 gene

Polymicrogyria is thought to be caused by genetic changes, and it has been linked to the ADGRG1 gene, also known as the GPR56 gene. ADGRG1 is a protein-coupled receptor that regulates the growth and adhesion of cells within the cortex. Variants in this gene have been found to be associated with the development of polymicrogyria.

The exact mechanisms of how changes in the ADGRG1 gene lead to polymicrogyria are still under investigation. However, it is thought that the genetic changes disrupt the normal development of the neurons and the folding of the cortex, leading to the formation of multiple small folds called microgyria.

Diagnosing polymicrogyria usually involves a combination of clinical signs, neuroimaging tests, and genetic testing. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is commonly used to visualize the brain’s structure and identify the characteristic features of polymicrogyria.

Resources for Polymicrogyria:

  • Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM): OMIM provides comprehensive information on genetic diseases, including polymicrogyria. It offers a detailed description of the condition, associated genes, and references to scientific articles.
  • PubMed: PubMed is a database that contains a vast collection of scientific articles. Searching for “polymicrogyria” on PubMed can provide additional research and information on the condition.
  • Polymicrogyria Registry: The Polymicrogyria Registry is a database that collects information about individuals with polymicrogyria and related conditions. It aims to improve understanding of the condition and facilitate research.
  • Other Genetic Testing Databases: Various genetic testing databases may offer information on polymicrogyria and the ADGRG1 gene specifically. These databases can provide details about available tests and resources for genetic testing.

It is important for individuals and families affected by polymicrogyria to consult with healthcare professionals and geneticists for accurate diagnosis, management, and guidance. They can provide information on available resources, support groups, and potential treatment options for managing the symptoms and associated problems.

Other Names for This Gene

This gene is also known by several other names:

  • ADGRG1 gene
  • adhesion G protein-coupled receptor G1
  • Adhesion G-protein coupled receptor G1
  • ADGRG1
  • Orphan G-protein coupled receptor ADGRG1
  • EMR1

These names may not be immediately recognizable, but they all refer to the same gene.

The receptor encoded by the ADGRG1 gene is a member of the adhesion G protein-coupled receptor family. It plays an important role in regulating cell growth and is related to various diseases and health conditions such as polymicrogyria.

Scientific literature and databases such as PubMed and OMIM provide additional information on this gene. In publications, it may be referred to by any of the names listed above.

Genetic testing and variant analysis can be performed to detect changes in this gene and to identify any associated health problems. Genetic tests and resources can be found in databases and registries that catalog genes and genetic conditions.

For more information on the ADGRG1 gene and its related conditions, many articles and references are available both online and offline.

Additional Information Resources

  • ADGRG1 gene: This gene is also known as GPR56 and encodes a receptor called adhesion G protein-coupled receptor G1. It regulates growth and development in the cortex and plays a role in adhesion of neurons and cells. Genetic changes in this gene have been linked to various conditions such as polymicrogyria and other cortical folding problems.
  • Genetic Resources:
    • OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man): OMIM is a comprehensive genetic database that provides information on genes and genetic diseases. ADGRG1 gene-related disorders and their associated genes can be found in the OMIM registry.
    • Genetic Testing: Genetic tests can help identify mutations or genetic changes in the ADGRG1 gene. These tests are often done for diagnostic purposes or to assess the risk of genetic disorders.
  • Scientific Articles and Publications:
    • PubMed: PubMed is a database of scientific articles in the field of medicine and life sciences. It contains a vast collection of research articles related to the ADGRG1 gene, its functions, and its associations with various diseases and conditions.
  • Other Resources:
    • Disease-specific Organizations: Various organizations and foundations dedicated to specific genetic diseases or conditions may provide additional information on ADGRG1 gene-related disorders.
    • Health Databases: Health databases, such as MedlinePlus or Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD), may have information on the ADGRG1 gene and related conditions.
    • Scientific Catalogs and Registries: Scientific catalogs and registries focused on genetic research may provide information on the ADGRG1 gene, related genes, and their functions.
See also  RNASET2 gene

Tests Listed in the Genetic Testing Registry

The ADGRG1 gene, also called the adhesion G protein-coupled receptor G1, regulates the growth and adhesion of cells within the cortex, the outer layer of the brain. Changes in this gene are associated with a condition called polymicrogyria, which is characterized by abnormal folding of the cortex and can lead to neurological problems.

Genetic testing for changes in the ADGRG1 gene can help diagnose individuals with polymicrogyria or related conditions. Genetic tests listed in the Genetic Testing Registry (GTR) provide information on variants of the ADGRG1 gene and other genes associated with polymicrogyria and orphan diseases.

The GTR is a resource that catalogs genetic tests and their names, scientific references, and other information. It includes tests from various databases, including OMIM, PubMed, and other scientific articles.

Testing for changes in the ADGRG1 gene can provide additional information for individuals with polymicrogyria or related conditions, as well as their families and healthcare providers. It can help determine the genetic cause of the condition and guide treatment and management decisions.

References:

  • Genetic Testing Registry (GTR)
  • OMIM database
  • PubMed
  • Scientific articles on ADGRG1 gene

Scientific Articles on PubMed

PubMed is a database that contains scientific articles on various health-related topics. This includes articles on the ADGRG1 gene, also called the adhesion G protein-coupled receptor G1.

The ADGRG1 gene is known to be involved in several conditions and diseases. It regulates the growth and adhesion of cells, and its changes can lead to problems in the cortex, such as polymicrogyria – a condition characterized by abnormal folds in the brain.

PubMed is a valuable resource for finding scientific articles on ADGRG1 and other genes. It provides a catalog of articles from various journals, allowing researchers to find the most relevant information for their studies.

In addition to PubMed, there are other databases and registries that focus on genetic information. One example is OMIM, which stands for Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man. It provides a comprehensive catalog of genes and genetic conditions, including those related to ADGRG1.

Scientists and researchers can use PubMed to find references to articles about ADGRG1 and its role in various diseases. These articles can provide valuable insights into the genetic testing and treatment options available for individuals with ADGRG1-related conditions.

Overall, PubMed serves as a valuable resource for scientists and researchers looking for scientific articles on the ADGRG1 gene and its associated diseases. It provides a comprehensive collection of articles that can help deepen our understanding of ADGRG1 and its role in various health conditions.

Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM

The ADGRG1 gene, also known as the adhesion G protein-coupled receptor G1, is a genetic receptor that regulates the growth and adhesion of cells in the brain cortex. Changes in this gene have been linked to various conditions and diseases.

One of the conditions associated with ADGRG1 gene changes is polymicrogyria, a rare brain disorder in which the cortex develops too many small folds. This can lead to problems with motor skills, intellectual disabilities, and other neurological issues.

See also  HSD3B2 gene

The OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) database is a valuable resource for genetic information on diseases and genes. It provides a catalog of genes and diseases, listing the genetic changes associated with each condition.

Within the OMIM database, the ADGRG1 gene is listed as a receptor protein-coding gene. It is related to various neurological conditions, including polymicrogyria. Additional information on the gene, such as its chromosome location and related scientific articles, can be found in the OMIM entry for ADGRG1.

The OMIM database also provides references to other scientific articles and resources related to ADGRG1 and its associated conditions. These references can be found in the “References” section of the OMIM entry for ADGRG1.

In addition to OMIM, there are other genetic databases and resources available for further testing and information on the ADGRG1 gene and related conditions. These include PubMed, a database of scientific articles, and the Genetic Testing Registry, which provides information on genetic tests available for specific genes and conditions.

In summary, the ADGRG1 gene, also known as adhesion G protein-coupled receptor G1, is a genetic receptor that regulates cell growth and adhesion in the brain cortex. Changes in this gene have been associated with conditions such as polymicrogyria. The OMIM database provides a catalog of genes and diseases, including information on the ADGRG1 gene and its associated conditions. PubMed and the Genetic Testing Registry are other resources that can provide additional information and testing options for ADGRG1-related conditions.

Gene and Variant Databases

The ADGRG1 gene, also known as adhesion G protein-coupled receptor G1, is associated with polymicrogyria, a condition characterized by abnormal folding of the cortex in the brain. This gene regulates the growth and development of neurons and plays a role in the adhesion of cells within the brain.

There are several databases available that provide scientific information and resources related to the ADGRG1 gene and its associated variants:

  1. OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man): OMIM is a comprehensive catalog of genetic conditions and the genes associated with them. It provides a wealth of information on ADGRG1 and other related genes.
  2. HGMD (Human Gene Mutation Database): HGMD is a database that collects information on genetic changes and disease-causing variants. It includes information on ADGRG1 variants and their clinical significance.
  3. Orphanet: Orphanet is a resource that provides information on rare diseases and orphan drugs. It includes information on ADGRG1-related conditions and available testing resources.
  4. PubMed: PubMed is a database of scientific articles and publications. Searching for ADGRG1 gene or variant names in PubMed can provide additional references and information on related research.

These databases can be valuable for researchers, healthcare professionals, and individuals interested in learning more about ADGRG1 gene and associated diseases. They provide a wealth of information and resources for further exploration.

References

  • OMIM: ADGRG1 gene – This article provides detailed information on the ADGRG1 gene listed in the OMIM genetic database. It includes names, genetic changes, and conditions related to the gene.

  • PubMed: ADGRG1 gene – PubMed is a comprehensive resource for scientific articles and research. This link provides a list of articles related to the ADGRG1 gene, including studies on its role in cell adhesion, receptor signaling, and neurological development.

  • GeneTests: ADGRG1 gene – GeneTests is a database for genetic testing information. This page provides a summary of the ADGRG1 gene, including its association with polymicrogyria, a condition affecting brain development.

  • ADGRG1 gene in other databases: ADGRG1 gene in NCBI Gene, ADGRG1 gene in Ensembl – These links provide additional resources for information on the ADGRG1 gene, including its function, expression patterns, and structural features.