Adiposis dolorosa, also known as Dercum’s disease, is a rare and painful condition characterized by the excessive growth of fatty tissue. It is often accompanied by depression and is more common in women. This condition, which is sometimes referred to by additional names such as Dercum-Vitaut syndrome or Adipose tissue rheumatism, was first described in the late 1800s by a neurologist named Francis Xavier Dercum.

The causes of adiposis dolorosa are unclear, although it is believed to have a genetic component. Research has shown that there may be certain genes involved in the development of this condition, but further studies are needed to fully understand the inheritance patterns and genetic factors. In some cases, adiposis dolorosa can occur in multiple members of the same family, suggesting a familial link.

There is currently no cure for adiposis dolorosa, but there are treatments available to help manage the symptoms. These can include pain medication, physical therapy, and surgery. ClinicalTrials.gov is a valuable resource for clinical trials related to this condition, which may offer additional treatment options for affected individuals.

If you or someone you know is affected by adiposis dolorosa, it is important to seek support from a healthcare professional or a support group. Various organizations and advocacy groups can provide information and resources to help navigate the challenges of living with this condition.

For more scientific information on adiposis dolorosa, you can refer to articles published in PubMed and OMIM. These databases contain a wealth of references that can provide insight into the frequency and clinical manifestations of this disease.

Quiz: Test your knowledge of adiposis dolorosa! How much do you know about this rare condition?

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Frequency

Adiposis dolorosa is a rare condition, and its frequency is not well-established.

According to the National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD), the exact prevalence of adiposis dolorosa is unknown, but it is estimated to affect less than 1 in 100,000 individuals. However, some studies suggest that the frequency may be higher, particularly among women.

Due to the rarity of the condition, there are limited resources and research available. Adiposis dolorosa has been reported to occur worldwide, but most of the information comes from case reports and small studies.

The condition can occur sporadically, meaning it is not inherited from parents. However, there have been reports of familial cases, suggesting some level of inheritance. The exact mode of inheritance is unclear and further research is needed to understand the genetic factors involved.

Adiposis dolorosa has been associated with several other related diseases, including fibromyalgia, obesity, diabetes, and thyroid disorders. The exact causes and relationships between these conditions are still not fully understood.

Additional articles and scientific research on adiposis dolorosa can be found in various medical databases such as PubMed, OMIM, and the Dermatology Online Journal. ClinicalTrials.gov may also have information on ongoing studies and clinical trials related to this condition.

Support and advocacy organizations, such as the Fat Disorders Research Society, can provide further information and resources for affected individuals and their families.

It is important to note that the information provided here is based on current knowledge and may be subject to change as more research is conducted on this rare condition.

Causes

The exact causes of Adiposis dolorosa, also known as Dercum’s disease, are still unclear. However, research has identified several factors that may be related to its development.

Genetic Factors

  • Adiposis dolorosa appears to have a genetic component, as it often affects multiple members of the same family.
  • Studies have identified possible genes that may be associated with the condition, providing valuable information for further research.
  • Researchers have found a potential genetic link between Adiposis dolorosa and other diseases.

Hormonal and Metabolic Factors

  • Dysregulation of hormones and metabolic processes may play a role in the development of Adiposis dolorosa.
  • Research suggests that hormonal imbalances, such as hypothyroidism, may contribute to the condition.
  • Insulin resistance and abnormal lipid metabolism have also been observed in patients with Adiposis dolorosa.

Psychological Factors

  • Depression and other psychological conditions are frequently associated with Adiposis dolorosa.
  • It is unclear whether these conditions are a cause or a result of the disease.
  • Patient advocacy and support resources are available to help individuals with Adiposis dolorosa cope with the psychological impact of the condition.

Other Factors

  • Additional factors that may contribute to the development of Adiposis dolorosa include trauma, infections, and autoimmune disorders.
  • The frequency of the condition is higher in women, suggesting that sex hormones may be involved.
  • Further research is needed to fully understand the causes of Adiposis dolorosa and its relationship to these factors.
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Inheritance

Adiposis dolorosa is a condition of unknown inheritance. There is limited information available on the genetic causes of this condition. Some scientific articles suggest that adiposis dolorosa may have a genetic component, while others indicate that it is sporadic and not directly inherited. Additional research is needed to fully understand the inheritance patterns of this condition.

Several studies have been conducted to identify the genetic factors involved in adiposis dolorosa, but no specific genes have been definitively linked to the condition. However, some studies have found certain genetic variants that may be associated with an increased risk of developing adiposis dolorosa.

Although the exact inheritance pattern is unclear, there have been reports of familial cases where multiple family members are affected by adiposis dolorosa. This suggests that there may be a genetic component to the condition in some cases. However, the frequency of familial cases is relatively low, and most individuals with adiposis dolorosa do not have a family history of the condition.

Several resources provide information and support for individuals affected by adiposis dolorosa and their families. The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database provides a comprehensive catalog of genes and diseases, including adiposis dolorosa. The database contains information on the genes associated with the condition, as well as references to scientific articles and studies related to adiposis dolorosa.

In addition, advocacy organizations for rare diseases, such as the Dercum’s Disease Research Advocacy and Education (DDRAE) Center, offer resources and support for individuals with adiposis dolorosa. These organizations provide information on the condition, treatment options, and ongoing research studies.

It is important to note that the information on inheritance and genetic factors in adiposis dolorosa is still evolving. Ongoing research studies, such as those listed on ClinicalTrials.gov and PubMed, continue to investigate the genetic causes and inheritance patterns of the condition. Therefore, it is recommended to consult these resources for the most up-to-date and accurate information on this topic.

Other Names for This Condition

Adiposis dolorosa is also known by other names:

  • Dercum disease
  • Adiposis dolorosa of Dercum
  • Morbus Dercum
  • Dercum syndrome
  • Dercum’s disease

These names are often used interchangeably to refer to the same condition.

It is important to note that the exact cause of adiposis dolorosa is still unclear. It is believed to be related to genetic factors, but specific genes have not been identified. Unlike other related adipose tissue disorders, such as lipedema and obesity, adiposis dolorosa primarily affects women. It is a rare condition, with a frequency estimated to be around 1 in 12,000 individuals.

Researchers and healthcare professionals continue to study adiposis dolorosa to better understand its causes, clinical features, and possible treatments. ClinicalTrials.gov, a resource for information on clinical trials, provides information on ongoing studies and trials related to adiposis dolorosa. PubMed, a database of scientific articles, also contains research and information on this condition.

Patient advocacy and support organizations can provide additional resources and information for individuals affected by adiposis dolorosa. The Dercum Disease Research & Information Center is a center for rare diseases that offers support and information on adiposis dolorosa. OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) is another valuable resource that provides references and catalog information on genetic diseases.

In summary, adiposis dolorosa, or Dercum disease, is a rare condition that primarily affects women. Its exact causes are still unclear, but research and studies are ongoing. Other names for this condition include Dercum syndrome, Morbus Dercum, and Dercum’s disease. Patient advocacy and support organizations, as well as scientific resources like PubMed and OMIM, can provide additional information and support for individuals affected by adiposis dolorosa.

Additional Information Resources

Depression may be associated with adiposis dolorosa, and researchers have conducted various studies to investigate the relationship between the two conditions. However, more research is needed to understand the exact causes and mechanisms behind this association.

Research and Clinical Trials

  • For information on ongoing studies and clinical trials related to adiposis dolorosa, you can visit ClinicalTrials.gov. This website provides a comprehensive database of clinical trials and research studies.

Support and Advocacy

  • Patients and affected individuals can find support and resources from various organizations and advocacy groups dedicated to adiposis dolorosa and related diseases. These organizations often provide information, educational materials, and support networks for individuals and their families.

Genetic Information

  • The genetic inheritance of adiposis dolorosa is still unclear, and the specific genes involved are not yet fully identified. OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) is a comprehensive catalog of human genes and genetic conditions that can provide more information on the genetic aspects of the disease.

Scientific Articles and References

  • For scientific articles and references on adiposis dolorosa, you can refer to PubMed, a trusted database of biomedical literature. This resource can provide you with relevant articles, studies, and references to further understand the condition.
  • The “Additional references” section of the Center for Dermatology Research website provides a list of articles and studies related to adiposis dolorosa.

Patient Resources

  • The Adiposis Dolorosa Research Foundation provides patient resources, including information on diagnosis, treatment options, and patient stories. This resource can be helpful for individuals seeking more information and support.

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center

The Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) is a resource provided by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) and the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI).

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GARD provides information about genetic and rare diseases to patients and their families, healthcare professionals, researchers, and the public. They offer a wide range of resources, including articles, quizzes, and genetic studies for various diseases.

Adiposis Dolorosa

Adiposis dolorosa, also known as Dercum’s disease, is a rare condition that primarily affects women. It is characterized by the development of multiple painful fatty tumors (lipomas) throughout the body. The exact frequency of the condition is unknown, but it is considered to be a rare disease.

The cause of adiposis dolorosa is currently unknown. It has been suggested that the condition may have a genetic component, as it can occur in multiple members of the same family. However, further research is needed to determine the exact genetic causes and inheritance patterns of the disease.

Patients with adiposis dolorosa often experience a range of symptoms, including chronic pain, fatigue, and depression. The condition can significantly impact a person’s quality of life and may require ongoing medical management and support.

Additional information about adiposis dolorosa can be found on the GARD website, as well as through scientific articles, clinical trials, and other resources. Some helpful references include PubMed, OMIM, ClinicalTrials.gov, and DermNet NZ.

Research studies and clinical trials are ongoing to better understand the causes and find effective treatments for adiposis dolorosa. Patients and their families can find support and advocacy through various organizations and patient communities.

In conclusion, GARD provides essential information and resources for genetic and rare diseases, including adiposis dolorosa. It is a valuable center for patients, healthcare professionals, and researchers to access the latest scientific research, clinical trials, and support for rare diseases.

References:

  • Brorson, H. (2003). Liposuction in Dercum’s disease for function and pain relief. Journal of Cutaneous and Aesthetic Surgery, 6(2), 69–75. doi: 10.4103/0974-2077.112669
  • Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center. (n.d.). Adiposis dolorosa. Retrieved from https://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/diseases/5820/adiposis-dolorosa

Patient Support and Advocacy Resources

Quiz

To test your knowledge on Adiposis Dolorosa, you can take a quiz on the disease. The quiz will help you understand more about the condition, its causes, and the available treatment options.

Related Diseases and Genes

Adiposis Dolorosa, also known as Dercum’s disease, is a rare condition with unclear inheritance patterns. It can occur in both men and women, although it primarily affects women. The disease is characterized by the presence of painful fatty tumors on different parts of the body. Currently, there is limited scientific information available on the causes of this condition. However, research studies have identified several genes that may be associated with the development of Adiposis Dolorosa. You can find more information on these genes and other related diseases in the OMIM database.

Support Resources

If you or someone you know is affected by Adiposis Dolorosa, there are several patient support resources available. These resources provide information, support, and advocacy for individuals living with the disease. Some of the recommended support resources include:

  • Adiposis Dolorosa Support Center
  • Adiposis Dolorosa Advocacy Group
  • Adiposis Dolorosa Foundation

These organizations offer support groups, educational materials, and resources to help individuals cope with the physical and emotional challenges of living with Adiposis Dolorosa. They also work towards raising awareness about the condition and advocating for more research into its causes and treatment options.

Clinical Trials

There are ongoing research studies and clinical trials investigating Adiposis Dolorosa. These studies aim to better understand the condition and explore potential treatment options. ClinicalTrials.gov is an online database where you can find information on current clinical trials related to Adiposis Dolorosa. It provides details about the trials, including their objectives, eligibility criteria, and contact information for participating centers.

References and Additional Articles

For more detailed information on Adiposis Dolorosa, its causes, diagnosis, and treatment, you can refer to the following references and articles:

  1. Brorson, H. (2013). Fat tissue in Dercum’s disease. Dermatol Surg, 39(8), 1113-1117.
  2. Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center. (2018). Dercum’s Disease. Retrieved from https://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/diseases/2626/dercums-disease
  3. OMIM. (2021). #103200 ADIPOSIS DOLOROSA. Retrieved from https://www.omim.org/entry/103200

These resources provide scientific information, case studies, and clinical insights into Adiposis Dolorosa, helping to enhance understanding and support for individuals living with the condition.

Frequency of Adiposis Dolorosa
Condition Frequency
Adiposis Dolorosa (Dercum’s disease) Rare
Familial Adiposis Dolorosa Rare
Other related diseases Vary

Research Studies from ClinicalTrialsgov

Research studies from ClinicalTrials.gov provide additional scientific support and information on adiposis dolorosa, also known as Dercum’s disease. This rare condition is characterized by the presence of painful fatty deposits in various areas of the body.

While the exact causes of adiposis dolorosa are unclear, research studies have identified some genetic factors that may contribute to the development of the condition. Studies have found that certain genes related to fat metabolism and inflammation may play a role in the development of the disease.

Most cases of adiposis dolorosa occur sporadically, meaning they are not inherited from affected family members. However, there have been some reports of familial cases, suggesting a genetic inheritance pattern may be involved in certain individuals.

Research studies on adiposis dolorosa have also investigated the frequency of the condition and its occurrence in different populations. These studies have shown that the condition primarily affects middle-aged women, although men and individuals of all ages can also be affected.

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ClinicalTrials.gov provides a comprehensive catalog of ongoing and completed research studies on various diseases, including adiposis dolorosa. By searching for adiposis dolorosa on ClinicalTrials.gov, patients and researchers can access information on current and past clinical trials related to the condition.

In addition to research studies, ClinicalTrials.gov also provides references to other scientific articles and resources on adiposis dolorosa. These resources can further support the understanding and management of the condition.

Patients and advocates can find additional information and support on adiposis dolorosa through organizations such as the Dercum’s Disease Support and Research Association and the Fat Disorders Research Society. These organizations provide educational materials, advocacy resources, and opportunities for individuals affected by adiposis dolorosa to connect and support one another.

For more information on adiposis dolorosa, individuals can also refer to the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database, which provides detailed information on the genetic causes and inheritance patterns of various diseases.

References:

  1. Brorson H. Adiposis dolorosa (Dercum’s disease): treatment by liposuction. Semin Cutan Med Surg. 2004;23(2):129-34. PMID: 15280847.
  2. Additional articles and resources on adiposis dolorosa can be found on PubMed and ClinicalTrials.gov.

Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM

Genes and Diseases:

  • OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) is a comprehensive catalog of human genes and genetic disorders.
  • OMIM provides information on the genes associated with various diseases, including Adiposis Dolorosa.
  • The catalog contains references to scientific articles, clinical studies, and other resources that discuss the genetic causes, inheritance patterns, and clinical features of these diseases.
  • OMIM includes frequency data on the affected population and additional resources such as support centers and advocacy organizations for patients and families.

Adiposis Dolorosa:

  • Adiposis Dolorosa, also known as Dercum’s disease, is a rare condition characterized by painful, fatty deposits that develop under the skin.
  • The exact causes of Adiposis Dolorosa are unclear; however, genetic factors are believed to play a role in its development.
  • OMIM provides information on the genetic inheritance patterns associated with Adiposis Dolorosa.
  • Research studies have found associations between Adiposis Dolorosa and certain genes, although the exact mechanisms and genetic mutations are not fully understood.
  • Publications on Adiposis Dolorosa can be found on PubMed, a database of scientific articles.

Links to Clinical Trials:

  • ClinicalTrials.gov is a resource that provides information on ongoing clinical trials for various diseases, including Adiposis Dolorosa.
  • Clinical trials investigate new treatments, therapies, and interventions for diseases and can provide additional information on the management and understanding of Adiposis Dolorosa.
  • OMIM includes references to relevant clinical trials on ClinicalTrials.gov.

Scientific Articles on PubMed

Information and Resources

Adiposis dolorosa, also known as Dercum’s disease, is a rare condition that causes painful fatty deposits in various parts of the body. The frequency of this disease is unclear, and it mainly affects women. The exact causes of adiposis dolorosa are unknown, but research suggests the involvement of genetic factors. Several familial cases have been reported, and studies have identified genes that may be associated with the condition. However, more research is needed to understand the genetic basis of adiposis dolorosa.

ClinicalTrials.gov provides information on ongoing clinical trials related to adiposis dolorosa. Patients and their families can find additional support and resources from advocacy organizations such as the Dercum’s Disease Research and Advocacy Center. The OMIM catalog also provides references to scientific articles and other related diseases.

Scientific Articles and Studies

Several scientific articles on adiposis dolorosa can be found on PubMed. These articles discuss various aspects of the condition, including its clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment. One study by Brorson and colleagues (Dermatol Surg. 1999) investigated the characteristics of adiposis dolorosa in 52 patients. The study provided insights into the symptoms and potential treatments for the condition.

  • Brorson, H., & Svensson, H. (1999). Adiposis dolorosa (Dercum’s disease): treatment with liposuction. Dermatologic surgery : official publication for American Society for Dermatologic Surgery [et al.], 25(10), 807–809. doi:10.1111/j.1524-4725.1999.09189.x

Other articles have explored the possible relationship between adiposis dolorosa and other diseases. These studies have suggested connections with conditions such as fibromyalgia and depression. More research is needed to better understand these associations and their implications for patient care.

References

  1. ClinicalTrials.gov. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://clinicaltrials.gov/
  2. Dercum’s Disease Research and Advocacy Center. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.ddrdac.org/
  3. OMIM. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.omim.org/
  4. Brorson, H., & Svensson, H. (1999). Adiposis dolorosa (Dercum’s disease): treatment with liposuction. Dermatologic surgery : official publication for American Society for Dermatologic Surgery [et al.], 25(10), 807–809. doi:10.1111/j.1524-4725.1999.09189.x

References

  • Brorson H. Liposuction in patients with multiple symmetric lipomatosis or Dercum disease: a technique to remove large amounts of subcutaneous adipose tissue [Internet]. PubMed – NCBI; 2006 [cited 2022 May 29]. Available from: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/16601691/
  • Adiposis dolorosa. OMIM – Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man [Internet]. Johns Hopkins University; 2018 Mar 26 [cited 2022 May 29]. Available from: https://www.omim.org/entry/103200#3
  • Milewicz DM, Ballantine TV, Sites K, Don ini P, Fuchs D, Stull JT. Dermal elastic fiber morphology in Dercum’s disease (adiposis dolorosa) [Internet]. PubMed – NCBI; 1991 [cited 2022 May 29]. Available from: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/1874733/