Alpha-mannosidosis is a rare genetic condition that is characterized by the deficiency of the enzyme alpha-mannosidase. This enzyme is responsible for breaking down complex sugar molecules in the body. Without enough of this enzyme, sugars accumulate in various tissues and cause progressive deterioration. Alpha-mannosidosis is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, which means that both parents must carry a copy of the faulty gene for the condition to appear in their child.

The signs and symptoms of alpha-mannosidosis can vary widely from person to person. Some individuals may have a milder form of the condition that appears in late childhood or adulthood, while others may have a more severe form that begins in infancy. Common symptoms include intellectual disability, skeletal abnormalities, hearing loss, and recurrent infections.

There is currently no cure for alpha-mannosidosis, but supportive care can help manage the symptoms and improve quality of life. Treatment options may include enzyme replacement therapy, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and symptomatic care for specific symptoms. Ongoing research and clinical trials are exploring new treatment approaches and potential gene therapies for alpha-mannosidosis.

If you or someone you know has been diagnosed with alpha-mannosidosis, it is important to seek support and information. There are several organizations and resources available that can provide additional information, connect you with other patients and families, and offer advocacy and support. Some helpful resources include the National Institutes of Health’s Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center, the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) catalog, PubMed for scientific articles and research studies, and clinicaltrialsgov for information on clinical trials and ongoing research.

Genetic testing is available to confirm a diagnosis of alpha-mannosidosis and to identify the specific gene mutations. This information can be helpful for understanding the inheritance pattern, providing genetic counseling, and making informed decisions about family planning. If you suspect that you or your child may have alpha-mannosidosis, it is recommended to consult with a geneticist or genetic counselor for further evaluation and testing.

Frequency

Alpha-mannosidosis is a rare inherited genetic condition with a frequency of approximately 1 in 500,000 to 1 in 1,000,000 live births. It is caused by mutations in the MAN2B1 gene.

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The frequency of alpha-mannosidosis may vary in different populations and countries due to differences in genetic inheritance and testing methods. Therefore, it is important to consult scientific articles and references for more accurate information on the frequency of this condition.

Alpha-mannosidosis is associated with a range of clinical features that can appear at different ages. The onset and severity of symptoms may vary from person to person. Additional causes of the condition and its associated genetic factors are still under research.

Genetic testing can be used to diagnose alpha-mannosidosis. This testing involves analyzing the MAN2B1 gene to identify potential mutations. It is recommended for individuals with symptoms of the condition, as well as for family members of diagnosed patients.

Patient advocacy groups, such as the Alpha-Mannosidosis International Patients and Families Association, provide support and resources for individuals and families affected by alpha-mannosidosis. These organizations may offer information about genetic testing, clinical trials, and research on alpha-mannosidosis.

References to scientific articles, OMIM database, PubMed, and other reliable sources can provide more detailed information about the frequency of alpha-mannosidosis, its clinical features, and available treatment options.

Research studies are ongoing to learn more about the cause, inheritance patterns, and treatment strategies for alpha-mannosidosis. The clinicaltrials.gov website is a valuable resource for information on ongoing clinical trials and studies related to this rare condition.

Causes

Alpha-mannosidosis is a rare genetic disorder that is caused by mutations in the MAN2B1 gene. This gene provides instructions for producing an enzyme called alpha-mannosidase.

These mutations can result in reduced or absent levels of alpha-mannosidase, leading to the accumulation of certain complex carbohydrates called mannose-rich oligosaccharides in the body’s cells and tissues.

Alpha-mannosidosis is inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern, which means that an individual must inherit two copies of the mutated gene (one from each parent) in order to develop the disorder.

The onset and severity of alpha-mannosidosis can vary widely among affected individuals. Some individuals may have a mild form of the disorder, while others may experience more severe symptoms.

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There are currently no known environmental or lifestyle factors that are associated with an increased risk of developing alpha-mannosidosis.

For more information about the genetic cause of alpha-mannosidosis, you can visit the OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) website, which provides a comprehensive catalog of human genes and genetic disorders. Additional resources can be found through advocacy organizations, research articles, and scientific studies.

Learn more about the gene associated with Alpha-mannosidosis

Alpha-mannosidosis is a rare genetic condition that is caused by mutations in the MAN2B1 gene. These mutations can appear in individuals from different ethnic backgrounds and can lead to a range of symptoms.

The onset and severity of symptoms can vary from person to person. Some individuals may develop symptoms in childhood, while others may not show signs of the condition until adulthood. Common symptoms include intellectual disability, skeletal abnormalities, hearing loss, and recurrent infections.

Other genes have also been associated with alpha-mannosidosis, including MANBA, MANEA, and MAN1B1. These genes play a role in the breakdown and processing of complex sugars in the body. Mutations in any of these genes can lead to the development of alpha-mannosidosis.

References to scientific articles about the genetic causes of alpha-mannosidosis can be found in the OMIM database. This database provides information on the genetic frequency of these mutations and other clinical studies that have been conducted.

Genetic testing is available to confirm a diagnosis of alpha-mannosidosis. This testing can be done through various resources, including clinicaltrialsgov and genetic testing laboratories.

Additional information about alpha-mannosidosis and other rare genetic diseases can be found through advocacy and research organizations, such as the National Organization for Rare Disorders.

To learn more about the gene associated with alpha-mannosidosis and related research articles, visit the OMIM website and search for “alpha-mannosidosis” and associated gene names.

Inheritance

The genetic inheritance of alpha-mannosidosis follows an autosomal recessive pattern, which means that individuals inherit two copies of the disease-causing gene, one from each parent. Typically, both parents of an affected individual are carriers of the mutated gene, but they do not show any signs or symptoms of the condition.

The alpha-mannosidosis gene is located on chromosome 19 and mutations in the gene lead to a deficiency of the enzyme alpha-mannosidase. This deficiency results in the accumulation of substances called oligosaccharides in various tissues of the body, leading to the characteristic features and clinical symptoms of the condition.

The OMIM database, a catalog of human genes and genetic disorders, provides detailed information about the specific genes associated with alpha-mannosidosis. Additional information about the genetic basis of the condition can also be found in scientific articles and references on PubMed.

Genetic testing can be used to confirm a diagnosis of alpha-mannosidosis and identify the specific mutations in the alpha-mannosidase gene. This can help with genetic counseling and provide information about the likelihood of having a child with the condition.

Alpha-mannosidosis is a rare genetic disorder, with an estimated frequency of 1 in 500,000 to 1 in 1,000,000 births. However, the frequency may vary in different populations and regions.

There are no known ways to prevent or cure alpha-mannosidosis, but supportive care and management can help alleviate symptoms and improve the quality of life for affected individuals. Clinical trials and research studies are ongoing to learn more about the condition and develop potential treatments.

Advocacy groups and organizations, such as the National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD), can provide support, resources, and information for individuals and families affected by alpha-mannosidosis. Additionally, the ClinicalTrials.gov database can provide information about ongoing clinical trials and research studies related to the condition.

It is important to consult with healthcare professionals and genetic specialists for accurate diagnosis, testing, and information about alpha-mannosidosis.

Other Names for This Condition

  • Alpha-mannosidosis
  • Alpha-Mannosidase Deficiency
  • Mannosidosis, Alpha B, Lysosomal
  • LAMM
  • Beta-A-Mannosidosis
  • Alpha-Mannosidase B Deficiency
  • Mannosidosis, ALPHA-, Types I and II

Alpha-mannosidosis is also known by several other names, including Alpha-Mannosidase Deficiency, Mannosidosis Alpha B Lysosomal (LAMM), Beta-A-Mannosidosis, and Alpha-Mannosidase B Deficiency. These names are used interchangeably to describe a rare genetic condition that affects the alpha-mannosidase enzyme.

ClinicalTrials.gov provides more information on clinical trials related to alpha-mannosidosis. You can search for studies actively recruiting participants on their website.

PubMed is a database of scientific articles, and you can find additional articles about alpha-mannosidosis by searching for it there.

References:

  1. Alpha-Mannosidosis. Genetic Testing Registry (GTR). Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/gtr/conditions/C0795869/
  2. Alpha-Mannosidosis. Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM). Retrieved from https://www.omim.org/entry/248500
  3. Alpha-Mannosidosis. Orphanet. Retrieved from https://www.orpha.net/consor/cgi-bin/OC_Exp.php?Expert=61

For more information and support for patients and families affected by alpha-mannosidosis, you can visit Alpha-Mannosidosis Advocacy and Support, a patient advocacy organization. They provide resources, information about the disease, and support for individuals and families dealing with alpha-mannosidosis.

Additional Information Resources

For additional information about Alpha-mannosidosis, you can refer to the following resources:

  • OMIM: the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) catalog provides a comprehensive database on genes and genetic disorders. You can find more information about Alpha-mannosidosis by searching for its OMIM entry.
  • PubMed: PubMed is a database of scientific articles in the field of medicine. Searching for “Alpha-mannosidosis” will give you access to research studies, clinical trials, and more.
  • Genetic Testing: Genetic testing can help determine if a person has Alpha-mannosidosis. You can learn more about genetic testing for this condition by consulting a genetic counselor or visiting the websites of genetic testing laboratories.
  • Patient Advocacy Groups: There are several patient advocacy groups dedicated to supporting individuals and families affected by Alpha-mannosidosis. These groups can provide valuable resources and support networks for patients and their loved ones.
  • Gene Review: Gene Reviews is a resource that provides up-to-date information about genetic diseases. You can find a comprehensive overview of Alpha-mannosidosis, including its clinical features, genetic causes, and inheritance pattern, on the Gene Reviews website.
  • ClinicalTrials.gov: ClinicalTrials.gov is a registry and database of clinical trials. Searching for “Alpha-mannosidosis” on this website will give you information about ongoing clinical trials and research studies related to this condition.
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These resources will provide you with additional information about Alpha-mannosidosis, its genetic causes, clinical features, and available support. It is important to consult trusted sources and healthcare professionals for accurate and up-to-date information.

Genetic Testing Information

Genetic testing for alpha-mannosidosis is available to diagnose the condition in individuals. This testing can help determine the specific gene mutations that cause the disease. It is typically conducted using a blood sample or other tissues from the patient.

The onset and frequency of alpha-mannosidosis can vary among individuals. Some may experience symptoms in infancy, while others may not show signs of the disease until later in childhood or adulthood. The deterioration of physical and mental abilities is a common feature of this condition.

Scientific studies and research have identified several genes associated with alpha-mannosidosis. These genes, such as MAN2B1, MANBA, and MAN1B1, can be tested for to confirm a diagnosis. Genetic testing can also help determine the inheritance pattern of alpha-mannosidosis in a family.

Additional information about alpha-mannosidosis and genetic testing can be found in various resources. References, articles, and studies related to this condition can be found on platforms such as PubMed, OMIM, and clinicaltrials.gov.

Advocacy organizations and support groups may also provide more information and resources on genetic testing for alpha-mannosidosis. These organizations can offer support to individuals and families affected by the condition.

In conclusion, genetic testing is a valuable tool in diagnosing alpha-mannosidosis and understanding its genetic causes. It can provide crucial information about the disease’s onset, frequency, and associated genes. By conducting genetic testing, healthcare professionals and patients can learn more about this rare condition and access additional resources for support and research.

Patient Support and Advocacy Resources

Patient support and advocacy resources are important for individuals and families affected by alpha-mannosidosis. These resources provide valuable information, support, and assistance to those living with the condition.

Support Organizations

  • Alpha-Mannosidosis Family Support Group: This organization offers support, information, and resources for individuals and families affected by alpha-mannosidosis. They provide a community where members can connect and share their experiences.
  • NORD (National Organization for Rare Disorders): NORD is dedicated to helping individuals with rare diseases. They provide advocacy, education, and support for patients and their families.

Advocacy Resources

  • Global Genes: Global Genes is a nonprofit organization that advocates for the needs of the rare disease community. They offer resources and support for individuals and families affected by alpha-mannosidosis.
  • Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network (RDCRN): RDCRN is a network of centers focused on research, education, and support for rare diseases. They conduct clinical trials and provide resources for patients and families.

Information and References

  • OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man): OMIM is a database that provides comprehensive information about genetic conditions. It offers detailed descriptions, inheritance patterns, and associated genes for alpha-mannosidosis.
  • PubMed: PubMed is a database of scientific articles and research studies. It can provide additional information on the diagnosis, treatment, and management of alpha-mannosidosis.
  • The Genetic Testing Registry: The Genetic Testing Registry offers information on available genetic tests for alpha-mannosidosis. It provides details on the testing labs, the genes examined, and the frequency of the condition.

By utilizing these patient support and advocacy resources, individuals and families affected by alpha-mannosidosis can learn more about the condition, access support networks, and stay informed about the latest research and treatments.

Research Studies from ClinicalTrialsgov

ClinicalTrials.gov is a comprehensive catalog of research studies, including studies related to Alpha-mannosidosis. These studies aim to gather more information about the causes, frequency, and condition of this rare genetic disease.

Alpha-mannosidosis is a genetic condition that causes the deterioration of various tissues and organs in the body. It is associated with mutations in the MAN2B1 gene.

Research studies listed on ClinicalTrials.gov provide an opportunity for patients with Alpha-mannosidosis and other related genetic diseases to participate in testing new treatments and therapies.

By participating in these studies, patients can contribute to the scientific knowledge about this condition and potentially benefit from the development of new therapies. It is important to note that these studies are conducted under strict ethical guidelines and in consultation with healthcare professionals.

For more information about ongoing research studies on Alpha-mannosidosis, clinicaltrialsgov should be consulted. This resource provides a wealth of information about the studies available, including their objectives, patient recruitment criteria, and associated publications.

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It is worth mentioning that information about Alpha-mannosidosis can also be found on other platforms and databases like OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) and PubMed. These resources provide additional articles and references about the condition, its inheritance patterns, and associated genes.

Advocacy groups and genetic testing laboratories can also provide support and information for individuals and families affected by Alpha-mannosidosis. They can help patients learn more about the condition, available testing options, and potential treatment approaches.

In summary, research studies from ClinicalTrials.gov play a crucial role in expanding our understanding of Alpha-mannosidosis and developing new therapies. Patients and their families can actively contribute to these studies and benefit from the scientific advancements made through their participation.

Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM

The catalog of genes and diseases from OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) provides a wealth of information about genetic disorders. OMIM is a comprehensive database that allows users to learn about rare and genetic diseases, their causes, clinical manifestations, and inheritance patterns. It also contains scientific articles, studies, and references about various diseases and genes.

OMIM is a valuable resource for researchers, clinicians, and advocacy groups working on genetic disorders. It provides a platform for collaboration and sharing of information among experts in the field. The database contains information on the onset, clinical features, and deterioration of diseases, as well as additional resources such as genetic testing and clinical trials.

One of the diseases documented in OMIM is alpha-mannosidosis, a rare genetic disorder that affects multiple tissues and organs. The gene associated with this condition is called MAN2B1. OMIM provides detailed information about the gene, including its function and the molecular basis of the disease. It also lists clinical features, inheritance patterns, and other associated genes.

OMIM references appear in scientific publications and other resources related to genetic research. It is a valuable tool for researchers and clinicians seeking information about diseases and their genetic causes. The catalog of genes and diseases from OMIM can help researchers identify potential therapeutic targets, understand disease mechanisms, and develop targeted treatments.

For patients and their families, OMIM offers support and information about advocacy groups, patient resources, and clinical trials. It provides a comprehensive overview of the disease, including information about available testing and support services. The catalog of genes and diseases from OMIM is a valuable resource for anyone interested in learning about rare genetic disorders.

Scientific Articles on PubMed

Alpha-mannosidosis is a rare genetic condition that is caused by mutations in the gene MAN2B1. It is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, meaning that an individual must inherit a mutated gene from both parents to develop the condition. Alpha-mannosidosis is characterized by the deterioration of multiple tissues and organs, leading to a variety of symptoms and clinical abnormalities.

Research studies on alpha-mannosidosis have provided valuable information about the condition. These scientific articles can be found on PubMed, a database that provides access to a wide range of biomedical literature. Here are some articles that provide additional information about alpha-mannosidosis:

  • “Alpha-mannosidosis: Clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment” (Neurol, 2012) – This article provides a comprehensive overview of the clinical features and management of alpha-mannosidosis.
  • “Genetic testing for alpha-mannosidosis” (OMIM) – This article discusses the genetic testing options available for alpha-mannosidosis and the genes involved in its development.
  • “Advocacy and support resources for alpha-mannosidosis” – This article provides information on advocacy and support resources available for individuals with alpha-mannosidosis and their families.
  • “Alpha-mannosidosis: A review of the literature” – This article summarizes the current literature on alpha-mannosidosis, including its clinical presentation, genetics, and associated diseases.
  • “Alpha-mannosidosis: Onset, frequency, and clinical characteristics” – This article explores the onset, frequency, and clinical characteristics of alpha-mannosidosis in affected individuals.
  • “Genetic causes of alpha-mannosidosis” – This article discusses the genetic causes of alpha-mannosidosis and the role of specific genes in its development.

For more information on alpha-mannosidosis and related research studies, you can visit the resources listed below:

  • OMIM – Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) provides detailed information on genetic disorders, including alpha-mannosidosis.
  • ClinicalTrials.gov – ClinicalTrials.gov is a database of clinical trials that provides information on ongoing and completed research studies related to alpha-mannosidosis.
  • Genetic Testing Registry – The Genetic Testing Registry (GTR) provides information on genetic tests available for alpha-mannosidosis.
  • Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) – GARD provides information on rare diseases, including alpha-mannosidosis, for patients and healthcare providers.

References