Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the most common cause of dementia in older people, is a neurodegenerative condition that affects the brain and leads to a gradual decline in cognitive function, memory loss, and changes in behavior. The exact cause of Alzheimer’s disease is not fully understood, but it is believed to be a combination of genetic, environmental, and lifestyle factors.

Research has shown that genetics plays a significant role in the development of Alzheimer’s disease. Certain genes, such as the APOE gene, have been identified as risk factors for the disease. This gene helps produce a protein called amyloid beta peptide, which can build up in the brain and form clumps known as amyloid plaques. These plaques are characteristic of Alzheimer’s disease and are thought to contribute to the destruction of brain cells.

There is also evidence to suggest that rare genetic variants can increase the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. These variants are often inherited within families and can significantly increase the likelihood of developing the condition at a younger age. The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database and PubMed are valuable resources for finding scientific articles and references on the genetic aspects of Alzheimer’s disease.

In addition to genetics, other factors such as age, lifestyle choices, and overall health can also influence the development of Alzheimer’s disease. Ongoing research and clinical trials, listed on websites such as ClinicalTrials.gov, aim to further our understanding of the causes and potential treatments for Alzheimer’s.

Genetic testing for Alzheimer’s disease is available, but it is not recommended for everyone. The testing can provide valuable information for individuals with a family history of the disease or those who are experiencing symptoms. Genetic counselors and advocacy organizations can provide more information on the benefits, limitations, and ethical considerations of genetic testing for Alzheimer’s disease.

It is important to note that Alzheimer’s disease is just one of many diseases associated with changes in the aging brain. There are other forms of dementia and neurodegenerative diseases that have different causes and symptoms. Support and care for individuals with Alzheimer’s and their families are available through various organizations and resources that specialize in Alzheimer’s care.

Patients, too, are unhappy with the care they receive during those brief interactions with their doctors. Healthcare communications company West Corporation reported that 25% of patients don’t feel that their provider cares about them as an individual and nearly 20% aren’t convinced their doctor is focused on improving their health – even though 93% of doctors strongly agree that patient satisfaction is important.

In conclusion, Alzheimer’s disease is a complex condition with genetic and environmental influences. Advances in research and the genetics of Alzheimer’s disease have provided additional insights into the causes and potential treatments for this devastating disease. While there is currently no cure for Alzheimer’s, understanding its genetic components can lead to better care, support, and potentially new treatments in the future.

Frequency

The frequency of Alzheimer’s disease varies among different populations. According to articles published in scientific journals, the prevalence of the disease is higher in individuals with certain genetic variants. One such variant is the apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene. Studies have shown that individuals with the APOE-ε4 variant of the gene are at a higher risk of developing the disease compared to those with other variants.

Genetic testing can be done to learn more about a patient’s genetic risk for Alzheimer’s disease. However, it is important to note that genetic testing for Alzheimer’s disease is not widely available and is not recommended for everyone.

The inherited form of Alzheimer’s disease, known as familial Alzheimer’s disease (FAD), is quite rare and accounts for less than 5% of all cases. FAD is caused by mutations in certain genes, such as the presenilin 1 (PSEN1) and presenilin 2 (PSEN2) genes. Some other genes associated with the development of Alzheimer’s disease include the amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene.

Most cases of Alzheimer’s disease are sporadic, meaning they occur randomly and are not directly inherited from a parent. The exact cause of sporadic Alzheimer’s disease is still not fully understood, but it is believed to involve a combination of genetic and environmental factors.

Studies have shown that the frequency of Alzheimer’s disease increases with age, with the majority of cases occurring in individuals over the age of 65. However, there is also a less common form of the disease known as early-onset Alzheimer’s disease, which can occur in individuals in their 40s or 50s.

More research and studies are needed to fully understand the genetic and environmental factors that contribute to the frequency and development of Alzheimer’s disease. The Alzheimer’s Disease Genetics Consortium (ADGC) and other research initiatives continue to support scientific studies on various aspects of the disease.

For more information on Alzheimer’s disease frequency and genetic testing, you can refer to resources such as the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database and PubMed, which provide free access to articles and research studies on this topic.

Causes

The exact cause of Alzheimer’s disease is still unknown, but several factors are believed to play a role in its development.

  • Genes: Genetic inheritance is thought to be a major contributor to the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. Certain genes, such as the APOE gene, have been associated with an increased frequency of the condition.
  • Altered amyloid peptide: Changes in the genetic variants of the amyloid precursor protein and the enzymes that process it can lead to the accumulation of amyloid plaques in the brain, which is a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease.
  • Other diseases: Some diseases and medical conditions, such as Down syndrome, Parkinson’s disease, and head injuries, have been associated with an increased risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease.
  • Environmental factors: Certain environmental factors, such as exposure to toxins and pollutants, may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease.

Genetic testing and research studies have provided valuable information about the genetic aspects of Alzheimer’s disease. Resources like PubMed, OMIM, and ClinicalTrials.gov offer free access to scientific articles, genetic references, and ongoing clinical trials.

Families with a rare genetic condition known as autosomal dominant Alzheimer’s disease (ADAD) have been instrumental in understanding the genetic causes of the condition. Studies conducted on these families have led to the discovery of several genes associated with the development of Alzheimer’s disease.

Alzheimer’s disease can cause a variety of symptoms, such as memory loss, difficulty with problem-solving and language, and changes in mood and behavior. Alzheimer’s advocacy and support organizations provide care and resources for those living with the condition and their families.

For more information on the causes of Alzheimer’s disease, individuals can learn from reputable sources such as the Alzheimer’s Association and other patient-centered organizations that provide additional resources and support during the diagnosis and management of the condition.

Learn more about the genes associated with Alzheimer’s disease

Alzheimer’s disease is a condition that affects the brain and is characterized by memory loss, cognitive decline, and behavioral changes. While the exact causes of Alzheimer’s disease are still unknown, it has been found to have a genetic component. Scientists have identified several genes that are associated with an increased risk of developing the condition.

One of the most well-known genes associated with Alzheimer’s disease is the APOE gene. This gene has three common variants: APOE2, APOE3, and APOE4. The APOE4 variant is the most well-established genetic risk factor for late-onset Alzheimer’s disease. Individuals who inherit one copy of the APOE4 variant have an increased risk of developing the disease, while those who inherit two copies have an even higher risk.

In addition to the APOE gene, there are other genes that have been found to play a role in Alzheimer’s disease. For example, mutations in the PSEN1, PSEN2, and APP genes can cause rare forms of Alzheimer’s disease that are inherited in a dominant pattern. These mutations lead to the production of a peptide called amyloid-beta, which forms plaques in the brain and contributes to the development of the disease.

It is important to note that while these genes are associated with an increased risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease, they do not guarantee that an individual will develop the condition. There are other factors, such as lifestyle and environmental factors, that can also influence an individual’s risk.

See also  VCP gene

Genetic testing can be done to identify these gene variants in individuals who have a family history of Alzheimer’s disease or who are showing symptoms of the condition. However, this testing is not recommended for everyone, as there is currently no cure for Alzheimer’s disease and the results may not provide actionable information.

Researchers continue to study the role of genetics in Alzheimer’s disease in order to better understand its causes and develop new treatments. There are ongoing clinical trials and research studies investigating the genetic aspects of the disease. Additional information and resources can be found on websites like ClinicalTrials.gov, Alzheimer’s Association, and OMIM.

In conclusion, genes play a significant role in the development of Alzheimer’s disease. Variants in genes such as APOE, PSEN1, PSEN2, and APP have been associated with an increased risk of developing the disease. However, it is important to note that genetic factors are not the sole cause of Alzheimer’s disease, and other factors such as lifestyle and environmental influences also play a role.

References:

  • “Genetics of Alzheimer’s Disease” – Alzheimer’s Association
  • “Alzheimer Disease Overview” – OMIM
  • “Genetics Home Reference” – National Library of Medicine

Inheritance

Inheritance refers to the passing of genes from parents to their offspring. In the case of Alzheimer’s disease, it is important to understand the role of genetic inheritance in the condition’s development. Alzheimer’s disease can be caused by both genetic and environmental factors, but only a small percentage of cases are caused by inherited genetic mutations.

There are two main types of inheritance patterns associated with Alzheimer’s disease: sporadic and familial. The sporadic form of Alzheimer’s is the most common, accounting for about 95% of cases. It does not have a clear inheritance pattern and is believed to be caused by a combination of genetic, environmental, and lifestyle factors.

The familial form of Alzheimer’s disease, on the other hand, is much less common but has a clear genetic inheritance pattern. It is caused by mutations in certain genes, such as the APP, PSEN1, and PSEN2 genes. These mutations are inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, which means that if a person inherits a mutated gene from one parent, they have a 50% chance of developing the condition.

Genetic testing can be done to learn more about an individual’s risk of developing familial Alzheimer’s disease. This testing can detect mutations in genes associated with the condition and can help individuals and their families make informed decisions about their health.

Advocacy organizations, such as the Alzheimer’s Association, provide support and information for individuals and families affected by Alzheimer’s disease. They also promote research and raise awareness about the genetic and environmental factors associated with the condition.

In addition to the dominant genes mentioned above, there are other genes that may play a role in the development of Alzheimer’s disease. For example, the APOE gene is associated with an increased risk of developing the condition. However, having the APOE gene does not guarantee that a person will develop Alzheimer’s, and many people with the gene never develop the disease.

Researchers continue to study the genetics of Alzheimer’s disease to better understand how changes in genes and proteins, such as amyloid beta peptide, are involved in the development of the condition. Clinical trials and research studies are ongoing, and resources such as ClinicalTrials.gov provide information about ongoing studies that individuals may be eligible to participate in.

To learn more about the genetic aspects of Alzheimer’s disease, there are several resources available. The National Institute on Aging’s Genetics of Alzheimer’s Disease Data Storage Site provides a catalog of genetic changes associated with the condition. The Alzheimer’s Disease Genetics Fact Sheet from the National Institute on Aging and the Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center provide additional information and resources for individuals and families affected by Alzheimer’s.

In conclusion, while genetic inheritance plays a role in the development of some cases of Alzheimer’s disease, it is important to note that the condition is not solely caused by genetic factors. Understanding the genetic and environmental causes of Alzheimer’s can help guide research, support patient care, and provide individuals and their families with valuable information and support.

Other Names for This Condition

Alzheimer’s disease is also known by other names, including:

  • AD (short for Alzheimer’s disease)
  • Dominant familial Alzheimer’s disease
  • Early-onset Alzheimer’s disease
  • Free sialic acid storage diseases
  • Late-onset Alzheimer’s disease

These different names represent the various aspects of this condition, as well as the different genetic factors associated with it. Alzheimer’s disease is primarily caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors.

In some cases, Alzheimer’s disease can be caused by rare mutations in certain genes, such as the APP, PS1, and PS2 genes. These mutations lead to an increased production of a peptide called amyloid beta, which accumulates in the brain and forms plaques.

Most cases of Alzheimer’s disease occur in people who do not have these rare genetic mutations. Instead, the disease is likely caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors, with the APOE gene playing a significant role. The APOE gene has different forms, or alleles, which are associated with different frequencies of the disease.

Studies have shown that people with the APOE ɛ4 allele have a higher risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease compared to those with the APOE ɛ2 or APOE ɛ3 alleles. However, having the APOE ɛ4 allele does not guarantee that a person will develop Alzheimer’s disease.

Research is ongoing to learn more about the genetics of Alzheimer’s disease and how it relates to the development, progression, and treatment of the condition. ClinicalTrials.gov and other resources provide information on current studies and clinical trials investigating the genetic causes and potential treatments for Alzheimer’s disease.

Patient support and advocacy groups, such as the Alzheimer’s Association, provide resources and information about living with and caring for individuals with Alzheimer’s disease. Scientific articles and research papers are also available through resources like PubMed and OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) for those interested in learning more about the genetic and scientific aspects of the condition.

Additional Information Resources

To learn more about Alzheimer’s disease and related genetic variants, here are some additional resources that may provide useful information:

  • Alzheimer’s Association: This organization offers support and resources for patients and families affected by Alzheimer’s disease. They provide information about the disease, caregiving tips, support groups, and advocacy initiatives. Visit their website at www.alz.org for more information.
  • Genetics Home Reference: This resource provides information about the genetics of Alzheimer’s disease and other genetic conditions. It includes articles about the genes associated with the disease, the role of genetics in developing Alzheimer’s, and testing options. Visit their website at ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/alzheimers-disease for more details.
  • OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man): OMIM is a catalog of human genes and genetic disorders. Their database includes information about the genes associated with Alzheimer’s disease and their frequency in affected individuals. You can access their database at omim.org.
  • PubMed: PubMed is a database of scientific studies and articles. You can search for research papers related to Alzheimer’s disease, its causes, symptoms, and treatment options. Visit their website at pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov to explore the latest research in the field.
  • Alzheimer’s Genetics Fact Sheet: This fact sheet provides a comprehensive overview of the genetic aspects of Alzheimer’s disease. It explains how genes and genetic variants can increase the risk of developing the condition and the role of the APOE gene in the disease. Download the fact sheet from the Alzheimer’s Association’s website.

These resources can provide valuable information and support for individuals and families affected by Alzheimer’s disease, helping them understand the condition, available testing options, and the latest research findings.

Genetic Testing Information

Genetic testing plays a crucial role in understanding the causes and inheritance patterns of Alzheimer’s disease. It helps in identifying the genetic variants associated with the disease and provides valuable information for those affected and their families.

Alzheimer’s disease is primarily caused by the abnormal buildup of a protein called amyloid peptide in the brain. This peptide is produced from the alteration of certain genes in the body.

See also  Alport syndrome

There are two main genes associated with Alzheimer’s disease: APP and PSEN1. Rare genetic variants in these genes can lead to the early-onset form of the disease, usually diagnosed before the age of 65. Another gene, APOE, is associated with the more common late-onset form of Alzheimer’s disease, typically diagnosed after the age of 65.

Genetic testing can help individuals understand their risk for developing Alzheimer’s disease. It can reveal if they have any variants in the APP, PSEN1, or APOE genes that increase their chances of developing the condition.

Additional research studies on other genes and their role in Alzheimer’s disease are ongoing. These studies aim to learn more about the genetic changes that occur during the development of the disease and identify potential targets for treatment.

Patients and their families can find more information about genetic testing for Alzheimer’s disease from reliable resources such as the Alzheimer’s Disease Education and Referral (ADEAR) Center and advocacy organizations like the Alzheimer’s Association.

Accounting for the genetic diversity present in different populations, various catalogs and databases are available to access genetic information specific to Alzheimer’s disease. ClinVar, OMIM, and PubMed are examples of scientific resources where one can find articles and studies related to the genetic causes of Alzheimer’s disease.

It is important to note that genetic testing for Alzheimer’s disease is not a diagnostic tool. It provides information about the genetic variants associated with the condition, but the presence of these variants does not guarantee the development of Alzheimer’s disease. Other factors, such as age, lifestyle, and environmental influences, also play a significant role in disease onset and progression.

For those interested in genetic testing, it is recommended to seek professional guidance and counseling before undergoing the test. Healthcare professionals can provide personalized advice and support, discussing the benefits, limitations, and possible implications of genetic testing.

Genetic testing for Alzheimer’s disease is often not covered by insurance, but there are clinical trials and research studies available that offer free testing for qualified individuals. Information about ongoing clinical trials can be found on websites such as clinicaltrials.gov.

  • Genetic testing plays a crucial role in understanding the causes and inheritance patterns of Alzheimer’s disease.
  • It helps identify the genetic variants associated with Alzheimer’s disease.
  • The abnormal buildup of a protein called amyloid peptide is a key contributor to Alzheimer’s disease.
  • Genes such as APP, PSEN1, and APOE are associated with Alzheimer’s disease.
  • Genetic testing can reveal the presence of variants in these genes that increase the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease.
  • Additional research studies are ongoing to learn more about the genetic changes underlying Alzheimer’s disease.
  • Information about genetic testing for Alzheimer’s disease can be found from reliable resources such as the Alzheimer’s Disease Education and Referral (ADEAR) Center and advocacy organizations.
  • Catalogs and databases such as ClinVar, OMIM, and PubMed provide scientific articles and studies on the genetic causes of Alzheimer’s disease.
  • Genetic testing is not a diagnostic tool for Alzheimer’s disease, and other factors also influence disease onset and progression.
  • Professional guidance and counseling are recommended before undergoing genetic testing for Alzheimer’s disease.
  • Clinical trials and research studies may offer free genetic testing for qualified individuals.
  • Information about ongoing clinical trials can be found on websites such as clinicaltrials.gov.

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center

The Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) is an incredible resource for anyone looking to learn more about rare diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease. GARD provides free access to a variety of resources and information about the causes, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of rare diseases.

From the GARD website, individuals can learn more about Alzheimer’s disease and its associated symptoms, frequency, and genetic causes. GARD offers a wealth of information about the condition, including scientific articles and research studies from sources like PubMed and OMIM, which are authoritative references in the medical field.

For those interested in patient advocacy and support, GARD provides additional resources and information about living with Alzheimer’s disease. Caregivers and families can find information on diagnosis, testing, and available treatments, as well as tips for managing the condition on a day-to-day basis.

GARD also offers information about genetic testing and inheritance patterns for rare diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease. Individuals can learn about the role of genetic changes and variants, such as the APOE gene and amyloid peptide, in developing the condition, as well as the genetic inheritance patterns that may contribute to its development.

In addition to providing information on rare diseases, GARD also serves as a hub for clinical trials and research studies related to Alzheimer’s disease. Individuals and families can find information about ongoing studies and clinical trials to potentially participate in, offering them access to innovative treatments and therapies.

GARD is an invaluable resource for individuals and families affected by Alzheimer’s disease or other rare genetic conditions. The center provides information, resources, and support to help individuals understand their condition and make informed decisions about their care.

  • Scientific articles and research studies
  • Patient advocacy organizations
  • Genetic testing information
  • Clinical trials and research studies
  • Information on rare diseases and their causes
  • Living with a rare disease
Additional resources from GARD:

Patient Support and Advocacy Resources

Alzheimer’s disease is a complex condition that affects millions of people worldwide. Patients diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease often require support and advocacy to navigate their treatment journey. There are various resources available to provide patients and their families with the necessary information and support.

Genetic Support Resources

For patients with Alzheimer’s disease that is caused by APOE gene variants, there are specific support resources available. The APOE gene is one of the dominant genetic factors that account for Alzheimer’s disease. These resources provide information about genetic testing, clinical trials, and the latest research on APOE and Alzheimer’s disease.

  • OMIM: OMIM is a comprehensive database that provides information about the genetics of Alzheimer’s disease. It lists the names of genes associated with Alzheimer’s disease and provides information about their functions and inheritance patterns.
  • ClinicalTrials.gov: ClinicalTrials.gov is a registry and results database of publicly and privately supported clinical studies. Patients can search for ongoing clinical trials related to Alzheimer’s disease and genetic testing.
  • PubMed: PubMed is a free resource that provides access to a vast collection of medical research articles. Patients can find articles about the role of genetics in Alzheimer’s disease and other related topics.

Patient Care and Living Resources

Living with Alzheimer’s disease can be challenging, both for the patients and their caregivers. These resources offer support and information about managing the symptoms and providing quality care for patients with Alzheimer’s disease.

  • Alzheimer’s Association: The Alzheimer’s Association is a leading organization that provides resources, education, and support for individuals living with Alzheimer’s disease and their families. They offer a wide range of services, including support groups, educational materials, and care planning assistance.
  • Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center: Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center is dedicated to advancing the understanding of Alzheimer’s disease. They provide information about the latest research, treatment options, and resources for patients and caregivers.
  • Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Disorders Association: The Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Disorders Association offers information and support for individuals affected by Alzheimer’s disease and other related dementias. They provide resources for caregivers, educational programs, and advocacy initiatives.

Advocacy and Information Resources

Advocacy organizations play a crucial role in raising awareness about Alzheimer’s disease and advocating for research funding and improved care. These resources provide information about advocacy initiatives and opportunities to get involved.

  • Alzheimer’s Impact Movement: The Alzheimer’s Impact Movement is the advocacy arm of the Alzheimer’s Association. They work to influence public policy, increase research funding, and improve dementia care and support services.
  • Alzheimer’s Disease Education and Referral Center: The Alzheimer’s Disease Education and Referral Center is a government-funded resource that provides information about Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias. They offer resources for patients, caregivers, and healthcare professionals.
  • Genetic Testing Resources: Genetic testing resources provide information about the different types of genetic testing available for Alzheimer’s disease. They offer guidance on the benefits, risks, and implications of genetic testing, as well as information on how to access testing services.

These resources offer valuable support and advocacy for individuals affected by Alzheimer’s disease. Whether it’s accessing genetic testing, finding support groups, or staying informed about the latest research, these resources can help patients and their families navigate the complexities of Alzheimer’s disease and make informed decisions about their care.

See also  Rhabdoid tumor predisposition syndrome

Research Studies from ClinicalTrialsgov

Research studies from ClinicalTrials.gov provide valuable insights into the testing and clinical care associated with Alzheimer’s disease. These studies aim to understand the causes, symptoms, and genetic influences of the disease to develop better care resources and potential treatments.

Alzheimer’s disease is a neurodegenerative condition that causes progressive memory loss and cognitive decline. It is the most common form of dementia, affecting millions of individuals worldwide. The exact causes of Alzheimer’s disease are not fully understood, but genetics play a crucial role, particularly in the early-onset forms of the disease.

One of the most studied genetic factors associated with Alzheimer’s disease is the apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene. Different forms of this gene can alter the frequency and severity of the disease. Individuals carrying the APOE ε4 allele have an increased risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease earlier in life, while those with the APOE ε2 allele may have a reduced risk.

Research studies from ClinicalTrials.gov focus on various aspects of Alzheimer’s disease, including changes in brain structure and function, the role of amyloid peptide in the disease process, and the impact of certain genes on disease progression. These studies aim to provide scientific evidence to develop better diagnostic tools, care strategies, and potential therapeutic interventions.

Living with Alzheimer’s disease can be challenging for both patients and their families. ClinicalTrials.gov provides information on clinical trials that offer free testing, care resources, and additional support for individuals diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease and their loved ones.

Research studies from ClinicalTrials.gov also explore the relationship between Alzheimer’s disease and other rare genetic diseases. Many of these diseases share common symptoms, such as memory loss and cognitive impairment, making it crucial to understand their genetic and clinical connections. By studying these rare diseases, researchers can gain a deeper understanding of the underlying genetic and biochemical pathways involved in Alzheimer’s disease.

For more information about specific research studies, including study names, trial centers, and patient resources, you can visit the ClinicalTrials.gov website. The website provides a comprehensive catalog of ongoing studies and clinical trials, allowing individuals to learn more about the latest research developments in the field of Alzheimer’s disease.

References:

  • Alzheimer’s Disease Genetics Fact Sheet. (2018, April 24). Retrieved from OMIM – Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man website: https://omim.org/entry/104300
  • Alzheimer’s Disease. (2021, April 29). Retrieved from PubMed Health website: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK1161/

Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM

OMIM, or Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man, is a comprehensive catalog of genetic and inherited diseases. It provides valuable information about genes associated with various diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease.

Alzheimer’s disease is a progressive neurological condition that primarily affects older adults. It is characterized by memory loss, cognitive decline, and changes in behavior. The exact causes of Alzheimer’s disease are still not fully understood, but genetic factors are believed to play a significant role.

OMIM contains a wealth of information about the genetic aspects of Alzheimer’s disease. It lists various genes that have been identified as being associated with the condition. Some of these genes are more commonly altered in Alzheimer’s disease patients, while others are rare variants.

One of the most well-known genes associated with Alzheimer’s disease is the APOE gene. Certain variants of this gene, particularly the ε4 allele, have been found to increase the risk of developing the disease. Genetic testing for the APOE gene can be useful in determining an individual’s risk for Alzheimer’s disease.

In addition to genes, OMIM also provides information about other genetic causes of Alzheimer’s disease. These include changes in the amyloid precursor protein gene and mutations in the presenilin genes, which are involved in the production of amyloid beta peptide, a key component of Alzheimer’s disease pathology.

OMIM references scientific studies and clinical trials related to Alzheimer’s disease and genetics. It is a valuable resource for researchers, healthcare professionals, and individuals interested in learning more about the genetic basis of Alzheimer’s disease.

OMIM’s catalog of genes and diseases offers a comprehensive overview of the current understanding of Alzheimer’s disease genetics. It showcases the complex interplay between genetic factors and the development of this debilitating condition. By providing information about the genes and genetic variants associated with Alzheimer’s disease, OMIM helps further research and improve patient care.

References:

  1. OMIM: Alzheimer disease
  2. OMIM: APOE gene
  3. PubMed: Genetic contributions to Alzheimer’s disease
  4. ClinicalTrials.gov: Alzheimer’s disease genetics

Scientific Articles on PubMed

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease that affects millions of people worldwide. It is diagnosed based on clinical symptoms and can be influenced by genetics. Research has identified several genes that are associated with the disease, and these genetic variants can increase the risk of developing Alzheimer’s.

Scientific articles on PubMed provide free access to more information about the genetics of Alzheimer’s disease. These articles include studies on the genes and genetic changes that can cause the disease, as well as clinical trials and advocacy resources for those diagnosed with Alzheimer’s.

One of the rare genetic conditions associated with Alzheimer’s disease is familial Alzheimer’s disease (FAD). FAD is caused by genetic variants in genes such as the APP gene, which produce altered forms of amyloid precursor protein (APP). These altered forms of APP lead to the production of an amyloid peptide that aggregates in the brain, forming plaques associated with Alzheimer’s disease.

Genetic testing plays a crucial role in understanding the genetic causes of Alzheimer’s disease. Testing can help identify individuals who may have an increased risk of developing the disease, guide patient care, and provide information for research studies. Genetic testing for Alzheimer’s disease can be done through clinical laboratories, and there are resources available to learn more about genetic testing and associated aspects.

Several scientific articles on PubMed discuss the frequency of genetic changes in Alzheimer’s disease and the role they play. These studies have found that some genetic variants are more common in individuals with Alzheimer’s disease, while others are less frequent. Understanding the genetics of Alzheimer’s disease can help researchers develop new therapies and interventions.

In addition to genetic causes, there are other factors associated with Alzheimer’s disease. Living a healthy lifestyle, such as regular physical exercise, a balanced diet, and mental stimulation, has been shown to reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. Care for individuals with Alzheimer’s disease involves managing symptoms, providing support, and considering the needs of the patient and their families.

References
Resource Additional Information
OMIM Genetic information and research articles on Alzheimer’s disease
ClinicalTrials.gov Information on clinical trials for Alzheimer’s disease
PubMed Scientific articles on Alzheimer’s disease and related topics
Alzheimer’s Association Advocacy and resources for individuals and families affected by Alzheimer’s disease

References

  • Alzheimer’s Disease – Genetics Home Reference – NIH. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/alzheimers-disease
  • Amyloid-beta recruitment of nuclear receptor corepressor RE1-silencing transcription factor (REST) to mediate endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced neurodegeneration. (2011). Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 108(14), 5703–5708. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1014959108
  • AlzGene Database. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.alzgene.org/
  • Arnold, S. E., Louneva, N., Cao, K., Wang, L., Han, L. Y., Wolk, D. A., et al. (2013). Cellular, synaptic, and biochemical features of resilient cognition in Alzheimer’s disease. Neurobiology of Aging, 34(1), 157-168. doi: 10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2012.05.019
  • Barabash, A., Zakharov, V., Cherezov, V., and Glocker, M. O. (2018). Alzheimer’s disease beyond amyloid: Can the repetitive failure of innate host defense favor chronic neuroinflammation?. Journal of Neuroinflammation, 15(1). doi: 10.1186/s12974-018-1141-y
  • Bettens, K., Sleegers, K., & Van Broeckhoven. C. (2013). Genetic insights in Alzheimer’s disease. The Lancet Neurology, 12(2), 92-104. doi: 10.1016/s1474-4422(12)70259-4
  • Campbell, A. M. (2021). Alzheimer’s Disease. In Biology (12th ed., openstax.org). Retrieved from https://openstax.org/books/biology/pages/31-1-alzheimers-disease
  • Copyright © 2021 Alzheimer Europe. Retrieved from https://www.alzheimer-europe.org/About-us/The-AE-Yearbook/AEU-2019/Dominantly-inherited-Alzheimer-network-DIAN
  • Chouraki, V., Reitz, C., Maury, F., Bis, J. C., Bellenguez, C., Yu, L., et al. (2015). Evaluation of a Genetic Risk Score to Improve Risk Prediction for Alzheimer’s Disease. Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, 44(1), 307–316. doi: 10.3233/JAD-141591
  • Corder, E. H., Saunders, A. M., Strittmatter, W. J., Schmechel, D. E., Gaskell, P. C., Small, G. W., et al. (1993). Gene dose of apolipoprotein E type 4 allele and the risk of Alzheimer’s disease in late onset families. Science, 261(5123), 921-923. doi: 10.1126/science.8346443
  • Di Battista, A. M., Heinsinger, N., Reimer, R. R., Cirone, J., Floyd, E. Z., et al. (2021). Amyloid and Tau Biomarkers in Autism. Spectrum Disorder: A Longitudinal Analysis of Four Biomarker Modalities. Retrieved from https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34658580/