Atopic dermatitis is a common skin condition that affects a large number of people. It is considered to be a genetic disorder, as studies have shown that certain genes play a role in its development. While the exact causes of atopic dermatitis are still being researched, it is believed to be a combination of genetic and environmental factors.

Genes associated with atopic dermatitis have been identified, although the inheritance pattern is not completely understood. Some people may have a family history of atopy, while others may have no known family history. It is thought that multiple genes are involved, and that having certain risk-associated genes may make a person more susceptible to developing the condition.

Atopic dermatitis is often associated with other allergic diseases, such as asthma and hay fever. Research has shown that these conditions are also influenced by genetics. Certain genes involved in immune function and the body’s natural reaction to allergens may contribute to the development of atopic dermatitis and other allergies.

If you or someone you know has atopic dermatitis, there are resources available to help. There are advocacy groups and support organizations that provide information and support for people with the condition. ClinicalTrials.gov is a searchable catalog of clinical trials that may be of interest to people with atopic dermatitis. Additionally, OMIM and PubMed are resources that provide additional information and research articles related to atopic dermatitis and other skin disorders.

In conclusion, atopic dermatitis is a complex condition with both genetic and environmental influences. While genes play a significant role in its development, there are still many unknowns. Continued research is necessary to learn more about the genetics and causes of atopic dermatitis, as well as to develop better treatment options for those affected.

Frequency

Atopic dermatitis is a common chronic inflammatory skin condition that affects approximately 15-20% of children and 1-3% of adults worldwide. The frequency of atopic dermatitis varies among different populations, and the condition can be influenced by both genetic and environmental factors.

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Research studies have shown that atopic dermatitis has a strong genetic component. People with a family history of atopic dermatitis, asthma, or allergies are at a higher risk of developing the condition. The risk of developing atopic dermatitis is approximately 60-80% when both parents have the condition, and around 40% when one parent is affected.

Although the exact inheritance pattern is still unclear, studies have identified several risk-associated genes that are associated with atopic dermatitis. These genes are involved in immune system function, the production of proteins that maintain the skin barrier, and the body’s response to allergens and infections. Many of these genes are also associated with other allergic diseases, such as asthma and allergic rhinitis.

While the exact causes of atopic dermatitis are still being studied, it is believed to be a complex interaction between genetic, environmental, and immunological factors. The condition is often characterized by an overactive immune response to certain triggers, such as allergens, irritants, and infections. This abnormal immune response leads to inflammation and the development of the characteristic symptoms of atopic dermatitis, such as redness, itchiness, and dry skin.

The frequency of atopic dermatitis can also be influenced by environmental factors, such as exposure to certain allergens, irritants, and climate conditions. Some studies have shown that living in urban areas and being exposed to pollution can increase the risk of developing atopic dermatitis. Additionally, exposure to certain microorganisms, such as fungi, in early life may play a role in the development of atopic dermatitis.

Atopic dermatitis can cause significant discomfort and have a negative impact on an individual’s quality of life. It is important for individuals with atopic dermatitis to have access to resources and support, such as patient advocacy groups and educational materials. These resources can provide information about the condition, its management, and available treatment options.

In conclusion, atopic dermatitis is a common inflammatory skin condition with a complex genetic and environmental etiology. While the condition is often inherited, it can also occur in individuals without a family history. Further research and genetic testing are needed to better understand the underlying causes of atopic dermatitis and develop more targeted treatments.

Causes

The exact causes of atopic dermatitis, also known as eczema, are still being studied by scientists and researchers. However, there are several factors that are believed to contribute to the development of this condition.

  1. Genetic Factors: Atopic dermatitis tends to run in families, suggesting a genetic component. Certain genes have been associated with an increased risk of developing atopic dermatitis.
  2. Allergies: Many people with atopic dermatitis also have allergies, such as asthma or hay fever. This suggests that there may be a shared genetic predisposition to allergic conditions.
  3. Environmental Factors: Environmental factors, such as exposure to certain allergens or irritants, can trigger or aggravate atopic dermatitis symptoms. These may include pet dander, dust mites, pollen, certain foods, and harsh chemicals.
  4. Immune System Dysfunction: Atopic dermatitis is believed to be associated with an altered immune response. The immune system may overreact to certain triggers, causing inflammation and itching.
  5. Skin Barrier Dysfunction: People with atopic dermatitis often have a compromised skin barrier, which allows irritants and allergens to penetrate the skin more easily.

It is important to note that while these factors may contribute to the development of atopic dermatitis, they do not necessarily cause the condition in every individual. Each person’s experience with atopic dermatitis can be unique.

Further research and genetic studies are needed to fully understand the underlying causes of atopic dermatitis. Scientists continue to explore the role of specific genes and immune system function in this condition.

For more information about the genetics of atopic dermatitis, please refer to the following resources:

  • OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) catalog of genetic conditions
  • Scientific articles and studies from PubMed
  • Publications from advocacy and support groups
  • Natural History of Atopic Dermatitis: 75 Genetic and Environmental Factors—the OMG cohort
  • Genetics Home Reference: Atopic dermatitis

Further research in the field of genetics and atopic dermatitis will help to improve our understanding of the condition and may lead to more effective treatments and management strategies.

See also  AUH gene

Learn more about the genes associated with Atopic dermatitis

Atopic dermatitis, also known as eczema, is a chronic inflammatory skin condition characterized by itchy, dry, and red patches of skin. It is a common condition, affecting approximately 15-20 percent of children and 1-3 percent of adults worldwide.

Although the exact causes of atopic dermatitis are not fully understood, research suggests that both genetic and environmental factors play a role in its development. In recent years, numerous genes have been identified as being associated with the condition.

Genes associated with atopic dermatitis are involved in various biological processes, including the immune system, skin barrier function, and the inflammatory response. Some of these genes are also associated with other allergic diseases, such as asthma and allergies.

One of the genes associated with atopic dermatitis is filaggrin (FLG). Filaggrin plays a crucial role in maintaining the skin’s barrier function, preventing water loss and protecting against environmental factors. Mutations in the FLG gene can lead to a defective skin barrier, making the skin more susceptible to irritants and allergens.

Other genes associated with atopic dermatitis include SPINK5, TSLP, IL-13, IL-4, and CARD11, among others. These genes are involved in various immune and inflammatory processes, and their altered function has been implicated in the development of atopic dermatitis.

Research on the genetics of atopic dermatitis is still ongoing, and more information about the specific genes and their functions is being discovered. Resources like PubMed, OMIM, and genetic research studies provide valuable information on the genes associated with atopic dermatitis.

Although having certain genes may increase the risk of developing atopic dermatitis, it does not guarantee that an individual will develop the condition. Environmental factors, such as exposure to allergens, pollutants, and certain foods, also play a significant role in triggering the condition.

In conclusion, atopic dermatitis is a complex condition with genetic and environmental influences. Understanding the genes associated with atopic dermatitis provides insight into the underlying mechanisms of the disease and may lead to the development of new treatments and preventive strategies.

Inheritance

Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic condition that affects the skin. It is not inherited directly from one generation to another. Instead, the risk of developing AD is influenced by a combination of genetic and environmental factors.

AD is considered to have a genetic component, as it often runs in families. However, the inheritance pattern is complex and not completely understood. Multiple genes have been identified to contribute to the development of AD, but the exact role of each gene is still being studied.

Some of the genes associated with AD are involved in the immune system and its function. These genes may be responsible for alterations in the skin barrier, making it more susceptible to irritants and allergens. Other genes may be related to the inflammatory response, which can lead to the characteristic signs and symptoms of AD.

Several studies have suggested that AD is inherited in an autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive manner, but these findings are not consistent across all populations. In some cases, AD may also occur sporadically without a clear pattern of inheritance.

While genetics plays a role in the development of AD, environmental factors also contribute significantly. Allergies, such as those to certain foods, pollen, or dust mites, can trigger or worsen AD symptoms. Exposure to irritants, such as certain soaps or fabrics, can also exacerbate the condition.

It is important to note that having a genetic predisposition does not guarantee the development of AD. Many people with genetic risk factors do not develop the condition, while others without such risk factors may still develop AD. Additionally, the severity and frequency of AD symptoms can vary widely among individuals with the condition.

Further research is needed to fully understand the genetic and environmental factors that contribute to the development of AD. Ongoing studies, such as those registered on ClinicalTrials.gov and published articles on PubMed, provide valuable insights into the underlying causes of AD.

For patients and their families, support and advocacy groups, such as those listed on the National Eczema Association website, can provide additional information and resources about AD and its impact on daily life. By learning more about the genetic and environmental factors associated with AD, individuals can better manage their condition and make informed decisions about treatment options.

Other Names for This Condition

Atopic dermatitis, also known as eczema, is a chronic inflammatory skin condition that affects a significant portion of the population. In scientific literature, it may be referred to by various names due to the different aspects of the condition that are being studied or discussed.

Some other names for atopic dermatitis include:

  • Atopic eczema
  • Infantile eczema
  • Allergic dermatitis
  • Endogenous eczema
  • Neurodermatitis
  • Flexural eczema
  • Prurigo Besnier
  • Disseminated neurodermatitis

These different names highlight specific aspects of the condition, such as its association with allergies (allergic dermatitis), the location of the affected areas (flexural eczema), or the intense itching that accompanies the condition (prurigo Besnier).

While the various names may be used interchangeably, it is important to remember that they all refer to the same underlying condition of atopic dermatitis.

Atopic dermatitis is a complex condition with multiple factors contributing to its development. Genetic factors, such as alterations in certain genes involved in immune function, play a significant role in the development of atopic dermatitis. Studies have shown that people with a family history of atopic dermatitis, allergies, or asthma are at a higher risk of developing the condition.

In addition to genetic factors, environmental factors and immune system dysregulation also contribute to atopic dermatitis. Exposure to certain allergens, such as pollen, pet dander, or dust mites, can trigger an allergic reaction in susceptible individuals. The immune system’s response to these triggers results in inflammation and the characteristic symptoms of atopic dermatitis.

Research and scientific studies are ongoing to better understand the causes and risk-associated factors of atopic dermatitis. This research includes testing new treatment options, learning more about the role of genetic inheritance and genes involved in atopic dermatitis, and studying the impact of environmental factors and lifestyle choices on the condition.

While there is no cure for atopic dermatitis, there are various treatment options available to manage the symptoms and improve the quality of life for those affected. These treatment options include topical medications, immunomodulators, and moisturizers to keep the skin hydrated. Lifestyle modifications, such as avoiding triggers, maintaining good skin hygiene, and using gentle skincare products, can also help manage the condition.

Patient advocacy groups and resources, such as the National Eczema Association and the American Academy of Dermatology, provide support, education, and information for people living with atopic dermatitis. ClinicalTrials.gov and PubMed are valuable resources for finding information about ongoing clinical trials and scientific articles related to research on atopic dermatitis.

See also  NOTCH3 gene

Overall, atopic dermatitis, or eczema, is a common and chronic skin condition that affects many individuals worldwide. Understanding the various names associated with the condition and staying informed about the latest research and treatment options can help patients and their families navigate and manage this condition effectively.

Additional Information Resources

For more information about atopic dermatitis, allergies, and other related conditions, you may find the following resources helpful:

  • PubMed – A database of scientific articles providing additional information on atopic dermatitis and related disorders. You can search for specific articles and learn more about the latest research in the field.
  • OMIM – Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) is a comprehensive database that provides information on genetic disorders, including atopic dermatitis. This resource can help you learn more about the genetic factors contributing to this condition.
  • ClinicalTrials.gov – This website provides information on ongoing clinical trials related to atopic dermatitis. By checking this resource, you can find out more about current research studies and opportunities to participate.

In addition to these resources, it is also important to consult with healthcare professionals and specialists who can provide sufficient information and support regarding atopic dermatitis and its management. They can guide you in terms of testing, treatment options, and lifestyle modifications to improve the quality of life for patients with this condition.

Genetic Testing Information

Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin condition that affects a significant percentage of people worldwide. While it is mainly caused by environmental factors, genetic factors also play a crucial role in its development. Genetic testing can provide valuable information about the genes associated with atopic dermatitis and contribute to a better understanding of the condition.

Genes such as FLG, filaggrin, and many others have been identified as risk-associated genes for atopic dermatitis. They are involved in the normal function of the skin barrier, and alterations in these genes can lead to a compromised epidermal barrier function. This compromised barrier allows for increased penetration of allergens, irritants, and pathogens, leading to an immune reaction and the development of atopic dermatitis.

Although the exact causes and mechanisms of atopic dermatitis are not fully understood, genetic testing can provide valuable information about an individual’s genetic predisposition to the condition. It can also help identify rare genetic diseases associated with atopic dermatitis, such as immunodeficiency disorders.

Genetic testing can be done through various resources, including research studies, clinical trials, and genetic testing companies. These tests can provide information about the specific genes and genetic variations associated with atopic dermatitis, as well as the frequency of these variations in the general population.

Patient advocacy groups and organizations such as OMIM and Pubmed provide additional information about the genes associated with atopic dermatitis and their functions. These resources can be valuable for individuals seeking more information about their condition and for healthcare professionals involved in the management of atopic dermatitis patients.

It is important to note that genetic factors are not the sole determinants of atopic dermatitis. Environmental factors, such as allergens, irritants, and infections, also play a significant role in its development. Genetic testing can provide insights into an individual’s genetic predisposition to atopic dermatitis but does not provide a definitive diagnosis on its own.

Genetic testing information can support clinical decision-making and help identify individuals at a higher risk of developing atopic dermatitis or associated conditions like asthma and allergies. By understanding the genetic factors contributing to atopic dermatitis, researchers can develop better treatments and interventions to improve the quality of life for individuals living with this condition.

References:

  • ClinGen: Atopic Dermatitis
  • Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center
  • OMIM: Atopic Dermatitis
  • Pubmed: Atopic Dermatitis Genetic Studies
  • ClinicalTrials.gov: Atopic Dermatitis
  • Atopic Dermatitis Advocacy and Support Organizations

Patient Support and Advocacy Resources

Patients with atopic dermatitis can benefit from various support and advocacy resources to learn about the condition and find support. These resources are particularly helpful for individuals who have immunodeficiency disorders, a clinical history of infections, or a risk associated with allergies.

One such resource is the Atopic Dermatitis Foundation, which provides information about the causes, symptoms, and treatment of atopic dermatitis. They also offer support for patients and their families, including information on clinical trials and research studies.

For individuals interested in learning more about the genetics of atopic dermatitis, the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) catalog provides information on the genes associated with the condition. This resource offers a comprehensive list of genes that have been studied in relation to atopic dermatitis, including information on their inheritance patterns and function.

PubMed is another valuable resource for patients with atopic dermatitis. This online database allows individuals to search for research articles about the condition, providing up-to-date information on the latest studies and findings.

In addition to these resources, advocacy organizations such as the National Eczema Association and the American Academy of Dermatology offer support for individuals with atopic dermatitis. These organizations provide information on managing the condition, tips for living with atopic dermatitis, and resources for finding a dermatologist or allergist.

It is important for patients with atopic dermatitis to have access to patient support and advocacy resources. These resources can provide valuable information about the condition, help individuals find support networks, and contribute to a better understanding of atopic dermatitis and its impact on daily life.

Research Studies from ClinicalTrialsgov

Atopic dermatitis is a skin disorder that does not have a single known cause. While the exact cause is still unknown, researchers have found that atopic dermatitis is a result of a combination of genetic and environmental factors. This condition is often seen in families with a history of allergies, asthma, or atopic dermatitis, suggesting a possible genetic inheritance.

Studies have shown that atopic dermatitis is caused by alterations in certain genes responsible for the function of the skin barrier. These genetic alterations contribute to an increased risk for developing atopic dermatitis, as well as other allergic disorders. Some of the genes associated with atopic dermatitis include FLG, IL13, IL4, and TSLP.

In addition to genetics, environmental factors also play a role in the development of atopic dermatitis. These include exposure to certain allergens, such as dust mites, pet dander, and pollen. Infections, especially with certain bacteria and fungi, can also trigger an inflammatory reaction in the skin and contribute to the development of atopic dermatitis.

Research studies on atopic dermatitis aim to learn more about the causes, risk-associated genes, and frequency of the condition. ClinicalTrialsgov is a valuable resource for finding information on ongoing and completed clinical trials related to atopic dermatitis.

Some of the research studies from ClinicalTrialsgov on atopic dermatitis include:

  • A study on the efficacy of a new topical cream for the treatment of atopic dermatitis.
  • A clinical trial investigating the use of a specific medication for managing severe cases of atopic dermatitis.
  • A study on the effects of different environmental factors on the development of atopic dermatitis in early childhood.
See also  PLCB4 gene

These research studies provide valuable information on the effectiveness of different treatments, the impact of environmental factors, and potential risk factors associated with atopic dermatitis.

PubMed and OMIM are other scientific resources where you can find articles and additional information on atopic dermatitis.

Although there is no known cure for atopic dermatitis, there are various treatment options available to manage symptoms and improve the quality of life for patients. These treatments may include topical creams, oral medications, or light therapy.

Patients with atopic dermatitis should work closely with their healthcare providers to develop a personalized treatment plan. Support groups and patient advocacy organizations can also provide additional support and information for those living with atopic dermatitis.

Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM

Atopic dermatitis, also known as eczema, is a chronic inflammatory skin condition that affects millions of people worldwide. It is characterized by dry, itchy, and inflamed skin. Although the exact cause of atopic dermatitis is unknown, research suggests that it is a complex disease with both genetic and environmental factors contributing to its development.

Genetic studies have identified several genes that are associated with atopic dermatitis. These genes are involved in the immune system and play a role in the body’s response to allergens and pathogens. Some of these genes are also associated with other immunodeficiency disorders.

OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) is a comprehensive catalog of genes and genetic disorders. It provides valuable information on the genes associated with atopic dermatitis and other related diseases. Here are some key genes and diseases from the OMIM catalog:

  • ATOD1 (Atopic Dermatitis 1): This gene is associated with atopic dermatitis and contributes to the altered immune function observed in patients with the disease.
  • ATOD2 (Atopic Dermatitis 2): This gene is involved in the production of skin barrier proteins and is associated with a higher risk of developing atopic dermatitis.
  • ATOD3 (Atopic Dermatitis 3): This gene is associated with a rare form of atopic dermatitis that is characterized by severe allergic reactions and recurrent infections.
  • ATOD4 (Atopic Dermatitis 4): This gene is involved in the production of cytokines, which are important in the body’s immune response. Alterations in this gene can lead to an increased risk of atopic dermatitis.

In addition to these genes, the OMIM catalog includes information on other genes and diseases associated with atopic dermatitis. It provides a valuable resource for clinicians, researchers, and advocacy groups interested in learning more about the genetic basis of the disease.

It is important to note that while genetic factors play a role in the development of atopic dermatitis, they are not the sole cause of the disease. Environmental factors, such as allergens, irritants, and infections, also contribute to the development of the condition.

For additional information on atopic dermatitis and related genetic disorders, the OMIM catalog is a valuable resource. It provides information on the frequency of the disease, inheritance patterns, clinical features, and more. The catalog also includes links to scientific articles, PubMed resources, and clinical trials.gov for further research and information.

Although atopic dermatitis can be a challenging condition to manage, with proper treatment and support, people with the disease can lead a normal life. Testing for genetic variants associated with atopic dermatitis may provide additional information for patient care and personalized treatment plans.

Scientific Articles on PubMed

Atopic dermatitis, also known as eczema, is a chronic condition that affects the skin. It is characterized by red, itchy, and inflamed patches on the skin. Atopic dermatitis has been the subject of many scientific studies and research, and numerous articles can be found on PubMed, a comprehensive database of scientific articles.

PubMed provides a wealth of resources for researchers and healthcare professionals looking to expand their knowledge on atopic dermatitis. These articles cover a wide range of topics, including the genetics, clinical trials, and treatment options for this condition.

Genetic Studies

  • Many studies have focused on the genetic factors that contribute to the development of atopic dermatitis. These studies have identified several risk-associated genes and genetic variants that are associated with the condition.
  • Research has shown that certain genes, such as filaggrin (FLG), play a crucial role in the development of atopic dermatitis. Mutations in the FLG gene are common in individuals with atopic dermatitis and can lead to a disrupted skin barrier function.
  • Other genes, such as those involved in immune system function and inflammation, have also been found to be associated with the development of atopic dermatitis.

Clinical Trials

  • Clinical trials play a crucial role in testing new treatments and therapies for atopic dermatitis. These trials help researchers evaluate the safety and efficacy of potential treatment options.
  • PubMed provides information on ongoing and completed clinical trials related to atopic dermatitis. This information can be valuable for patients and healthcare professionals seeking to stay updated on the latest advancements in treatment options.
  • By regularly checking clinicaltrialsgov and PubMed, researchers can access information on the latest clinical trials and their results.

Allergies and Immunodeficiency

  • Atopic dermatitis is often associated with other allergic diseases, such as asthma and allergic rhinitis. Many scientific articles on PubMed discuss the relationship between these conditions and atopic dermatitis.
  • Immunodeficiency disorders also contribute to the development and severity of atopic dermatitis. Research indicates that individuals with immunodeficiency disorders are at an increased risk of developing atopic dermatitis.
  • Fungi and other allergens have also been studied in relation to atopic dermatitis. Some studies suggest that exposure to certain fungi may contribute to the development of this condition, particularly in individuals with a genetic predisposition.

Scientific articles on PubMed provide valuable information about the genetics, clinical trials, and other research studies related to atopic dermatitis. These resources contribute to our understanding of the condition and help guide further research and treatment options.

References

  • National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases. (2016, March). Atopic Dermatitis (Eczema). Retrieved from https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/atopic-dermatitis-eczema

  • Allergies and Atopic Dermatitis. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.aad.org/public/diseases/eczema/atopic-dermatitis#treat

  • Nixon, R., & Jenkins, M. (2017). Genetic factors in atopic dermatitis. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, 53(5), 412-416. doi: 10.1111/jpc.13514

  • Gao, P., Rafaels, N. M., Hand, T., Murray, T., & Boguniewicz, M. (2015). Filaggrin mutations that confer risk of atopic dermatitis confer greater risk for eczema herpeticum. Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 135(1), 156-161. doi: 10.1016/j.jaci.2014.07.070

  • Hanifin, J. M. (2009). Progress in the understanding of the genetic basis of atopic dermatitis. Acta Dermato-Venereologica, 89(4), 335-339. doi: 10.2340/00015555-0696

  • Fitzpatrick’s Dermatology in General Medicine (8th ed., Vol. 1). (2012). (Freedberg, I. M., et al. Eds.) New York, NY: The McGraw-Hill Companies.

  • Genetic Disorders – Atopic dermatitis. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/atopic-dermatitis