Betrixaban

If you have epidural or spinal anesthesia or a spinal puncture while taking a ‘blood thinner’ such as betrixaban, you are at risk of having a blood clot form in or around your spine that could cause you to become paralyzed. Tell your doctor if you have an epidural catheter that is left in your body or have or have ever had repeated epidural or spinal punctures, spinal deformity, or spinal surgery. Tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are taking amiodarone (Pacerone, Nexterone); anagrelide (Agrylin); aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others), indomethacin (Indocin, Tivorbex), ketoprofen, and naproxen (Aleve, Anaprox, others); azithromycin (Zithromax, Zmax); cilostazol (Pletal); clarithromycin (Biaxin, in Prevpac); clopidogrel (Plavix); dipyridamole (Persantine); eptifibatide (Integrilin); heparin; ketoconazole (Nizoral, Extina); prasugrel (Effient); selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) such as citalopram (Celexa), escitalopram (Lexapro), fluoxetine (Prozac, Sarafem, Selfemra, in Symbyax), fluvoxamine (Luvox), luvoxamine (Luvox), paroxetine (Brisdelle, Paxil, Pexeva), and sertraline (Zoloft); and serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) such as duloxetine (Cymbalta), desvenlafaxine (Khedezla, Pristiq), levomilnacipran (Fetzima), milnacipran (Savella), and venlafaxine (Effexor); ticagrelor (Brilinta); ticlopidine; tirofiban (Aggrastat); verapamil (Verelan, Calan); and warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven). If you experience any of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately: back pain, muscle weakness, numbness or tingling (especially in your legs and feet), loss of control of your bowels or bladder, or inability to move your legs.

Your doctor or pharmacist will give you the manufacturer’s patient information sheet (Medication Guide) when you begin treatment with betrixaban and each time you refill your prescription. Read the information carefully and ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions. You can also visit the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) website (http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/DrugSafety/ucm085729.htm) or the manufacturer’s website to obtain the Medication Guide.

Talk to your doctor about the risk of taking betrixaban.

🔔 Why is this medication prescribed?

Betrixaban is used to prevent deep vein thrombosis (DVT; a blood clot, usually in the leg) and pulmonary embolism (PE; a blood clot in the lung) in people who are hospitalized for serious illnesses and are at risk of developing a clot due to decreased ability to move around or other risk factors. Betrixaban is in a class of medications called factor Xa inhibitors. It works by blocking the action of a certain natural substance that helps blood clots to form.

🔔 How should this medicine be used?

Betrixaban comes as a capsule to take by mouth. It is usually taken with food once a day for 35 to 42 days. Take betrixaban at around the same time every day. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Take betrixaban exactly as directed. Do not take more or less of it or take it more often than prescribed by your doctor.

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Continue to take betrixaban even if you feel well. Do not stop taking betrixaban without talking to your doctor. If you stop taking betrixaban, your risk of a blood clot may increase.

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🔔 Other uses for this medicine

This medication may be prescribed for other uses; ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.