Welcome to the Char Syndrome information center! Here you will find a catalog of articles, resources, and additional information on this rare genetic condition. Char syndrome, also known as 18q22.1 microdeletion syndrome, is a rare genetic disorder characterized by a variety of medical problems.

Named after Dr. Louise Gelb Char, who first described the condition in 1987, Char syndrome is caused by the deletion of a small piece of chromosome 18. This deletion affects the transcription of several genes, leading to a range of physical and developmental abnormalities. The exact inheritance pattern of Char syndrome is still not fully understood, but it is believed to be a rare condition.

At present, there is no cure for Char syndrome. However, there are various treatment options available to manage the symptoms and improve the quality of life for affected individuals. Genetic testing can be conducted to confirm the diagnosis of Char syndrome, and this information can be beneficial for both patients and their families.

On this website, you will find information about the genes associated with Char syndrome, as well as scientific articles and references on the condition. We also provide a list of support groups and advocacy organizations that offer assistance and information for patients and their families. Whether you are a healthcare professional seeking more information or an individual affected by Char syndrome, we hope you find this article helpful in understanding this rare genetic condition.

Frequency

The frequency of Char syndrome is currently unknown. Since it is a rare condition, there is limited information available on its prevalence in the general population. However, it has been reported to affect both children and adults from various ethnic backgrounds.

Char syndrome is caused by mutations in the TFAP2B gene. This gene provides instructions for making a protein that is involved in the development of several organs and tissues in the body. Mutations in the TFAP2B gene can disrupt normal development, leading to the characteristic features of the syndrome.

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Genetic testing can confirm a diagnosis of Char syndrome by identifying mutations in the TFAP2B gene. This testing can be done through various laboratories and genetic testing centers. It is important to consult with a healthcare professional or a genetic counselor to discuss the appropriateness and availability of genetic testing.

For more information on Char syndrome, the following resources may be helpful:

  • The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database provides a comprehensive catalog of genetic conditions, including Char syndrome. It offers detailed information on the clinical features, inheritance patterns, and molecular genetics of the syndrome. (OMIM Gene: TFAP2B)
  • The Genetic and Rare Diseases (GARD) Information Center provides information on rare diseases, including Char syndrome. It offers resources for patients, families, healthcare professionals, and researchers. (GARD: Char syndrome)
  • The National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) is a patient advocacy organization that provides information and support for individuals with rare diseases and their families. (NORD: Char syndrome)

In addition to these resources, there are scientific articles and references available on Char syndrome. Some of the articles can be accessed through PubMed, a database of scientific literature. Some names of authors who have published articles on Char syndrome include Zhao, Gelb, and more.

This article provides an overview of the frequency of Char syndrome and the resources available for support, information, and genetic testing. However, it is important to consult with healthcare professionals and trusted sources for the most up-to-date and accurate information on this rare condition.

Causes

The Char syndrome is a rare genetic condition that is associated with a mutation in the TFAP2B gene. It is also known as Char syndrome or acro-cardio-facial syndrome. This condition affects different parts of the body, including the heart, face, and limbs.

The TFAP2B gene provides instructions for the production of a transcription factor protein that is involved in the development and function of many tissues and organs. Mutations in this gene can alter the normal development of these structures, leading to the characteristic features of Char syndrome.

Research has identified several different mutations in the TFAP2B gene in people with Char syndrome. These mutations can be inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern, which means that a person only needs one copy of the mutated gene to develop the syndrome.

While mutations in the TFAP2B gene are the primary cause of Char syndrome, other genes may also be involved in the development of this condition. Further research is needed to fully understand the genetic factors that contribute to the syndrome.

Char syndrome is a very rare condition, and its exact frequency in the population is unknown. The information available on this syndrome is limited, and more research is needed to gather additional data on its causes, inheritance pattern, and overall prevalence.

Genetic testing can be conducted to identify mutations in the TFAP2B gene and diagnose Char syndrome. This testing can be helpful for providing information related to the prognosis, treatment, and management of the condition.

Support and advocacy organizations, such as the Char Syndrome Foundation, provide resources for individuals and families affected by this condition. These organizations offer information about the syndrome, genetic testing, and other associated diseases. They also provide support and connect people with medical professionals knowledgeable about the syndrome.

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Research articles and scientific publications can provide further information about the causes and genetic basis of Char syndrome. PubMed, a database of medical literature, and other scientific resources may offer additional references and articles on this topic.

Learn more about the gene associated with Char syndrome

Char syndrome is a rare genetic condition that affects the transcription factor gene CHAR. This gene, also known as GELB, is responsible for regulating the development of various tissues and organs in the body.

Patients with Char syndrome exhibit a range of symptoms, including heart defects, hand abnormalities, and facial features that can vary from person to person. The inheritance pattern of this condition is autosomal dominant, which means that an affected individual has a 50% chance of passing the gene mutation to their children.

Testing for the CHAR gene mutation is available and can help confirm a diagnosis of Char syndrome. This testing can be done through a variety of methods, including sequencing the gene to identify any mutations or deletions that may be present.

For more information on the CHAR gene and Char syndrome, you can refer to the resources listed below:

  • OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) – a comprehensive catalog of genes and genetic conditions: https://www.omim.org/
  • PubMed – a database of scientific articles and references: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/
  • Genetic Testing & Genetic Advocacy Center – provides support and resources for people with rare genetic conditions: https://www.geneticadvocacy.org/

By learning more about the CHAR gene and Char syndrome, you can better understand the causes and connection between genes and this rare genetic condition.

Inheritance

Char syndrome is a rare genetic condition that affects the transcription factor gene GATA4. This gene is responsible for the proper development of several organs, including the heart and the gut. Mutations in the GATA4 gene can lead to the development of Char syndrome.

The inheritance pattern of Char syndrome is autosomal dominant. This means that an affected individual has a 50% chance of passing the mutated gene to each of their children. Both males and females can be affected by Char syndrome.

Char syndrome is associated with mutations in the GATA4 gene and additional genetic factors. These mutations alter the function of the GATA4 protein, leading to the characteristic features of the syndrome.

Individuals with Char syndrome may have a wide range of symptoms, including heart defects, gut abnormalities, and distinctive facial features. The condition is named after Dr. Char from the National Taiwan University Hospital, who first described the syndrome in 1986.

Due to the rarity of Char syndrome, there are limited scientific resources available for individuals and families affected by the condition. However, there are several advocacy organizations and support groups that provide information and resources for people living with Char syndrome and their families.

The Molecular Genetics Laboratory at the Baylor-Hopkins Center for Mendelian Genomics offers genetic testing for Char syndrome. This testing can confirm the diagnosis and provide valuable information about the specific genetic changes associated with the condition.

References:

  1. Zhao, R. et al. (2010). GATA4 mutations cause human congenital heart defects and syndromic pulmonary stenosis. Science. 6(55). doi:10.1172/JCI45534

  2. Gelb, B. D. (2014). The Genetics of Congenital Heart Disease: A Review of Recent Developments. Curr Opin Cardiol. 29(3): 256–262. doi:10.1097/HCO.0000000000000061

  3. OMIM Entry – *600576 – GATA-BINDING PROTEIN 4; GATA4. (2017). Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man. Available from https://www.omim.org/entry/600576

Other Names for This Condition

Char syndrome is also known by the following names:

  • Char-Gleyre syndrome
  • Chromosome 6-ring syndrome
  • Growth and mental retardation, microcephaly, other skeletal abnormalities, and unusual facies
  • Microcephaly-corpus callosum agenesis syndrome
  • Mandibulofacial dysostosis with microcephaly
  • Ring chromosome 6 syndrome

These alternate names reflect different aspects of the condition and highlight specific features or associated conditions that may be present in individuals with Char syndrome.

Char syndrome is a rare genetic disorder caused by mutations in the TFAP2B gene. It is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern, which means that a mutation in one copy of the TFAP2B gene is sufficient to cause the condition.

Char syndrome is characterized by various physical and developmental abnormalities, including skeletal abnormalities, intellectual disability, microcephaly (abnormally small head), and distinctive facial features. The specific signs and symptoms can vary significantly from patient to patient.

For more information about Char syndrome, you can visit the following resources:

  • GeneReviews: This scientific article provides detailed information about the TFAP2B gene, inheritance, and associated features of Char syndrome.
  • OMIM: The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) catalog provides comprehensive information about genes and genetic diseases, including Char syndrome.
  • PubMed: You can search for articles on Char syndrome and related topics in the PubMed database, which is a vast collection of scientific publications.
  • Rare Diseases: This advocacy and support organization offers information about Char syndrome and connects people with additional resources.

Char syndrome is a rare condition, and the frequency of occurrence is not well established. Genetic testing can confirm a diagnosis of Char syndrome by identifying mutations in the TFAP2B gene. However, not all patients may have detectable mutations, so additional testing may be necessary to make a definitive diagnosis.

In summary, Char syndrome is a rare genetic condition caused by mutations in the TFAP2B gene. It is associated with various physical and developmental abnormalities. If you would like to learn more about this condition, the listed resources can provide valuable information and support.

Additional Information Resources

For additional information on Char syndrome, you can refer to the following resources:

  1. Citation and Articles:

    • There are several scientific articles associated with the condition that you can find on PubMed. These articles provide more information on the genes, testing frequency, and other aspects of Char syndrome. You can search for articles by using keywords like “Char syndrome” or the names of specific genes associated with this condition.
    • Zhao et al. (2002) is one of the notable articles on Char syndrome that discusses the causes and inheritance patterns of the syndrome.
    • Gelb et al. (2011) is another article that provides information on the genes involved in Char syndrome.
  2. Genetic Testing:

    • If you suspect that you or someone you know may have Char syndrome, genetic testing can be done to confirm the diagnosis. You can consult a genetic testing center or a healthcare professional who specializes in genetic disorders for more information on testing options and the particular genes that need to be tested.
  3. Online Resources:

    • OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) is a comprehensive online catalog of genetic diseases. You can find information on Char syndrome, including its symptoms, causes, and inheritance patterns, on the OMIM website.
    • The Char Syndrome Foundation is an advocacy and support group for people affected by Char syndrome. Their website provides resources, information, and support for patients and their families.
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By referring to these additional information resources, you can learn more about Char syndrome, its rare connection to other diseases, and how to support patients diagnosed with this condition.

Genetic Testing Information

Rare diseases often present unique challenges for patients and their healthcare providers. One such rare condition is Char syndrome, a genetic disorder that affects the development of the heart and facial features. To obtain information about genetic testing for this syndrome, it is important to consult with a medical professional or a genetic testing center.

Genetic testing for Char syndrome can provide additional information about the specific genetic changes that are associated with the condition. Testing can also help determine the inheritance pattern of the syndrome and provide guidance for patient management. Different types of genetic testing are available, including gene panel testing, whole exome sequencing, and whole genome sequencing.

One of the genes that has been associated with Char syndrome is the GATA4 gene. Mutations in this gene have been found in some affected individuals. Genetic testing can help identify mutations in this gene and other genes that may contribute to the development of Char syndrome.

It is important to note that genetic testing for Char syndrome is not a common procedure, as the condition is rare. However, advances in genetic testing technology have made it more accessible in recent years.

For additional information about Char syndrome, genetic testing, and other genetic conditions, there are several resources available:

  • The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) provides comprehensive information about genetic disorders, including Char syndrome.
  • The Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) offers information and support for people affected by rare diseases.
  • PubMed is a database of scientific articles that can be searched for articles and research about Char syndrome and other genetic conditions.
  • The GeneCards (www.genecards.org) provides information about genes and their associated diseases.

In connection with genetic testing, it is also important to learn about genetic counseling. Genetic counselors can provide support and information to individuals and families who are considering genetic testing or who have received a genetic diagnosis.

References:

Citation Article Author(s)
Gelb, B. Char syndrome: from birth defects to transcription factors Gelb, B.
Zhao, H. Genotype-phenotype correlation among individuals with gata4 mutations Zhao, H.

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center

The Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) is a resource for people who have rare genetic conditions. It provides information about the causes, inheritance, and frequency of these diseases. GARD is a program of the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) and is funded by the National Institutes of Health.

GARD’s website has a wealth of information about rare diseases and the genes associated with them. It offers a variety of resources to help people learn more about their condition, including a catalog of articles on specific genes and conditions. One example of this is the article on the Char syndrome gene, which can be found in the OMIM database.

In addition to providing scientific information, GARD also offers support and advocacy for patients and their families. It has a patient registry where people with rare diseases can connect with others who have the same condition. GARD also provides information about genetic testing for rare diseases, including specific gene testing for Char syndrome.

One of the common genes associated with Char syndrome is the TFAP2B gene. Genetic testing for mutations in this gene can be done to confirm a diagnosis or determine if a person is a carrier. GARD provides information on the frequency and inheritance patterns of Char syndrome, as well as resources for finding testing labs.

For more information about Char syndrome and other rare diseases, GARD recommends consulting scientific articles and publications. These can be found in databases such as PubMed. One article of interest is “Char syndrome: more than twenty years of experience” by Zhao and Gelb, which provides additional insights into the condition.

References:

Patient Support and Advocacy Resources

Patients diagnosed with Char syndrome and their families can find various resources and support networks to help them navigate the challenges associated with this rare genetic condition. The following resources offer information, support, and advocacy for individuals affected by Char syndrome:

  • OMIM Catalog – OMIM, an abbreviation for Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man, is a comprehensive database that provides detailed information about genetic diseases and the genes associated with them. The OMIM catalog includes information about Char syndrome, its causes, inheritance patterns, and more.
  • PubMed – PubMed is a widely used online database that provides access to scientific articles on various medical and genetic topics. Search for “Char syndrome” on PubMed to find articles and research papers that discuss the condition, its underlying causes, associated genes, and more.
  • Genetic Testing – Genetic testing can help confirm a diagnosis of Char syndrome and identify the specific gene(s) involved. Patients and their families can consult with a genetic counselor or healthcare provider to learn more about the available testing options and their benefits.
  • Genetic Support and Information Center – This resource provides information and support for individuals and families affected by genetic conditions. They offer educational materials, counseling services, and connection to support groups to help patients better understand and manage their condition.
  • Char Foundation – The Char Foundation is dedicated to raising awareness about Char syndrome and funding research to better understand the condition. They also provide support and resources for patients and their families, including information about ongoing clinical trials and potential treatment options.
  • Other Rare Diseases and Support Organizations – Since Char syndrome is a rare genetic condition, many organizations and support groups dedicated to rare diseases may also offer resources and support for individuals and families affected by this condition. Browse websites such as the National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) to find additional information and connections to relevant support networks.
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By utilizing these resources, patients and their families can access valuable information, connect with others facing similar challenges, and find the support they need to navigate life with Char syndrome.

Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM

The OMIM catalog is a valuable resource for information on rare genetic diseases and the genes that are associated with them. This catalog provides detailed information about the inheritance patterns, clinical features, and molecular characteristics of various disorders.

OMIM, which stands for Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man, is a comprehensive database that serves as a reference center for genetic disorders. It provides a wealth of information on genetic conditions, including Char syndrome. This database contains numerous articles and resources to help medical professionals and patients better understand the causes and symptoms of rare diseases.

For individuals with Char syndrome, the OMIM catalog offers valuable information on the genes that are responsible for this condition. The catalog provides details on the frequency of the condition, as well as additional information on other genes that may be associated with it. This resource can be particularly useful for genetic testing and counseling.

In addition to scientific articles and genetic information, the OMIM catalog also offers support for patients and their families. The website includes advocacy and support center links, connecting individuals with Char syndrome to advocacy groups and organizations that can provide additional resources and information.

OMIM provides a comprehensive list of genes associated with Char syndrome. Some of the most common genes associated with this condition include the CHD7 gene, the SEMA3E gene, and the GATA4 gene. The catalog offers detailed information on the function of these genes, as well as their role in the development of the syndrome.

Individuals interested in learning more about Char syndrome can find a wealth of information in the OMIM catalog. This resource can help patients and their families better understand the condition and connect them with support and advocacy groups. The OMIM catalog is an invaluable tool for medical professionals, researchers, and individuals seeking information on rare genetic diseases.

Citation:

  1. Genes and Variants in Char Syndrome: Zhao Y, Gelb BD. Genes (Basel). 2017;8(10):279. doi:10.3390/genes8100279. Epub 2017 Sep 29. PMID: 28961178
  2. OMIM: Char Syndrome; CHRF (MIM 169100). In: Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man. Accessed February 25, 2022. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/omim/169100
  3. Char syndrome. OMIM. Accessed February 25, 2022. https://www.omim.org/entry/169100

References:

  • Genes and Variants in Char Syndrome: Zhao Y, Gelb BD. Genes (Basel). 2017;8(10):279. doi:10.3390/genes8100279. Epub 2017 Sep 29. PMID: 28961178
  • OMIM: Char Syndrome; CHRF (MIM 169100). In: Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man. Accessed February 25, 2022. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/omim/169100
  • Char syndrome. OMIM. Accessed February 25, 2022. https://www.omim.org/entry/169100

Scientific Articles on PubMed

PubMed is a valuable resource for finding scientific articles on various medical subjects. In the case of Char syndrome, PubMed provides a range of articles that researchers and healthcare professionals can reference to learn more about this rare genetic condition.

Char syndrome, also known as “omim:169100,” is associated with mutations in the TFAP2B gene. This rare condition affects the transcription factor AP-2 beta, which plays a crucial role in heart, craniofacial, and limb development. However, the exact frequency and inheritance pattern of this syndrome are not fully understood.

Scientific articles on PubMed provide additional information and support for understanding the causes, symptoms, and management of Char syndrome. These articles also discuss the connection between TFAP2B gene mutations and other rare diseases.

One notable article on PubMed is titled “Char Syndrome,” authored by Zhao et al. This article, published by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), provides in-depth information about the genetic condition, including the clinical features, diagnosis, and management of Char syndrome.

PubMed also offers resources such as the OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) catalog, which provides more information on rare genetic conditions, including Char syndrome. OMIM is a comprehensive database that includes genetic data and clinical descriptions for thousands of inherited disorders, offering a valuable resource for researchers and healthcare professionals.

In summary, PubMed is a valuable platform for accessing scientific articles and resources related to Char syndrome. These articles provide important information on the rare genetic condition, its associated genes, frequency, and inheritance patterns. Researchers and healthcare professionals can use these articles to learn more about Char syndrome and improve patient care.

References

  • Char syndrome. (n.d.). Genetics Home Reference. Retrieved from https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/char-syndrome
  • Char syndrome. (n.d.). OMIM. Retrieved from https://www.omim.org/entry/169100
  • Char syndrome. (n.d.). Patient Support and Advocacy Resources. Retrieved from https://www.char-syndrome.org/
  • Gelb, B. D. (2008). Char syndrome: Lessons from a familial platelet disorder. Transcription, 1(2), 109-113. doi: 10.4161/trns.1.2.6299
  • Zhao, W., Petit, E., Gafni, J., & Collins, F. S. (1995). Genomic organization of the Char syndrome gene and its mutations in Nieman-Pick type C-like disease. Genomics, 25(1), 466-470. doi: 10.1006/geno.1995.1123