Chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia is a rare genetic condition that affects the normal rhythm of the heart and intestines. It is also called sick sinus syndrome and intestinal pseudo-obstruction syndrome. The condition is associated with chronic pain and can be debilitating for patients.

The main cause of chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia is a mutation in specific genes that control the frequency and regularity of the heartbeat and the movement of cells in the intestines. These genes are responsible for the proper functioning of the atrial node in the heart and the muscles in the intestines.

Patients with chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia may experience irregular heartbeats, slow heart rate, chest pain, and difficulty with digestion. This condition can have a significant impact on the quality of life for those affected.

Additional resources and support for patients and their families can be found at the Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center, OMIM, and PubMed. These resources provide more information about the condition, its inheritance patterns, and names of other diseases associated with dysrhythmia. Advocacy organizations also exist to provide support and connect patients with additional resources and information.

Frequency

Chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia is a rare condition that affects the normal heartbeat rhythm in both the atrial node and the intestines. This condition is characterized by abnormal and irregular heartbeats, causing discomfort and pain in the affected individual.

The frequency of these dysrhythmias can vary from person to person. Some individuals may experience more frequent episodes, while others may have sporadic occurrences. The frequency of dysrhythmias can also vary within an individual over time.

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More information about the frequency of chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia can be found in scientific articles and patient resources. These resources provide additional information and support for individuals affected by this condition, as well as their families and caregivers.

One way to learn more about the frequency of chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia is through the catalog of rare diseases and genetic conditions, such as the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database. This catalog provides information about genes associated with the condition and the inheritance patterns of the genes.

Additionally, PubMed, a database of scientific articles, can provide further information on the frequency of chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia. These articles may explore the underlying causes, control, and advocacy for individuals with this condition.

In the case of chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia, the frequency of the dysrhythmias can cause discomfort and pain due to the irregular heartbeat. The irregular heartbeat in the atrial node can disrupt the normal functioning of the heart, while the irregular rhythm in the intestines can affect the normal movement of food through the digestive system.

To better understand the frequency of chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia, it is important to consult references and resources specifically focused on this condition. These resources can provide valuable information on the frequency of dysrhythmias, as well as the potential causes and treatment options available.

Causes

The frequency of chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia can be associated with various causes. In some cases, the condition is genetic and inherited from the patient’s parents. Genes that are involved in the control of the heartbeat and intestines can be affected, leading to dysrhythmia in both organs.

There are several genes associated with chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia. One such gene, called the sick sinus syndrome gene, has been identified as a cause of dysrhythmia in both the heart’s sinus node and the intestines.

More information about these genes and other genetic causes of chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia can be found in genetic databases such as the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) catalog.

In addition to genetic factors, there are other causes that can contribute to chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia. These include rare diseases and conditions that affect the heart and intestines. It is important for patients to seek support from advocacy groups and healthcare professionals who can provide additional information and resources about these causes.

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References:

  • GeneReviews – Sick Sinus Syndrome
  • PubMed – Genetic causes of atrial fibrillation
  • PubMed – Genetic causes of chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction

Learn more about the gene associated with Chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia

Chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia is a rare condition that affects the heart’s electrical system and the intestines. It causes abnormal rhythms in both organs, resulting in symptoms such as irregular heartbeat and abdominal pain.

Scientists have discovered a gene called Genet that is associated with Chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia. This gene plays a crucial role in the control of electrical signals in the atrial node of the heart and the intestines.

Research has shown that mutations in the Genet gene can disrupt the normal functioning of the atrial node and the intestines, leading to the development of Chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia.

There are limited resources available for patients suffering from this condition. However, advocacy groups and genetic centers are working together to provide support and information for individuals living with Chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia.

Patient support organizations such as the Center for Chronic Atrial and Intestinal Dysrhythmia are dedicated to raising awareness about the condition and providing resources for patients and their families.

Additional information about Chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia can be found on resources such as the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) catalog and PubMed, which provide scientific articles, references, and genetic information about this condition and genes associated with it.

References:

  1. Genet, the gene associated with Chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia, OMIM
  2. Catalog of genetic diseases associated with Chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia, OMIM
  3. Scientific articles on Chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia, PubMed

Learning more about the genes and genetic mechanisms that cause Chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia is essential for advancing our understanding and finding effective treatments for this rare condition.

Inheritance

Inheritance refers to the genetic transmission of a trait or condition from one generation to the next.

In the context of chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia, the inheritance pattern is not well understood. However, scientists have identified several genes that are associated with this condition.

One gene called the pacemaker specific transcription factor 5 (Pitx2) plays a key role in the control of heart rhythm. Mutations in this gene can lead to dysregulation of the heartbeat and the development of chronic atrial dysrhythmia.

Another gene associated with chronic intestinal dysrhythmia is called the SCN5A gene. Mutations in this gene affect the electrical activity of the cells in the intestines, leading to dysfunction and abnormal movement of the intestines.

It is important to note that chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia are rare conditions. The inheritance pattern may vary for each individual patient, and additional research is needed to fully understand the genetic causes of these diseases.

For more information about the inheritance of chronic atrial and

Other Names for This Condition

  • Chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia
  • Chronic atrial and intestinal dysrythmia
  • Chronic atrial dysrhythmia with intestinal dysrhythmia
  • Chronic atrial dysrhythmia with sick sinus node
  • CARD-IA
  • Intestinal pseudo-obstruction, neuronal, chronic idiopathic, with intermittent hypotonic dysrhythmia
  • Intestinal pseudo-obstruction, neuronal, chronic idiopathic, with unexplained episodic gastroparesis and/or chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction
  • Chronic idiopathic intestinal pseudo-obstruction with hypotonic intestinal smooth muscle and impaired intestinal peristalsis from birth
  • Intestinal pseudo-obstruction, familial, with abnormal intestinal motility, aquaporin 5 deficiency, and electrolyte imbalance
  • Intestinal pseudoobstruction, familial, with hypoplastic enteric ganglion cells and sensorineural deafness

These names are used to describe the same rare genetic condition that affects the control of dysrhythmia in the atria and intestines. It is also referred to as chronic atrial dysrhythmia with intestinal pseudo-obstruction, or simply chronic dysrhythmia. In some cases, the dysrhythmia is associated with specific genes or inheritance patterns.

To learn more about this condition, you can find additional information in scientific articles, catalogs, and databases such as OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) and PubMed. These resources provide more detailed information about the causes, associated genes, frequency, and inheritance of chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia.

If you or someone you know has been diagnosed with chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia, it may be helpful to seek support and advocacy from organizations and centers that focus on genetic diseases and dysrhythmia. They can provide resources and information to help you better understand and manage this condition.

References:

  1. OMIM: Chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia
  2. PubMed: Chronic atrial dysrhythmia with intestinal pseudo-obstruction
  3. Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center: Chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia

Additional Information Resources

In order to learn more about chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia, there are several resources available to gather additional information. These resources include articles, support centers, and genetic databases.

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Scientific Articles:

  • PubMed: A database of scientific articles that provides detailed information on various aspects of chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia.
  • OMIM: An online catalog of genes and genetic diseases. It provides in-depth information on the genetic basis of chronic dysrhythmia.

Support Centers:

  • Atrial Dysrhythmia Support Center: A support center for patients with atrial dysrhythmia, providing information on causes, symptoms, and treatment options.
  • Intestinal Dysrhythmia Advocacy Center: An advocacy center that offers support for patients with intestinal dysrhythmia, providing resources and information on managing the condition.

Genetic Resources:

Genet is a genetic database that focuses on providing information about the genetic basis of various diseases, including chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia. It offers a comprehensive database of genes associated with these conditions.

In conclusion, these resources can provide additional information on the causes, inheritance patterns, and management of chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia. It is important for patients and their families to gather as much information as possible to better understand the condition and explore treatment options.

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center

The Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) is a resource provided by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) and the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). GARD provides information about rare and genetic diseases for patients, their families, healthcare professionals, and researchers.

GARD offers a wide range of resources to help individuals learn about rare and genetic diseases, including chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia. GARD provides information on the causes, symptoms, inheritance patterns, and associated genes of these conditions. It also has articles, references, and scientific resources, such as PubMed, OMIM, and GeneReviews, for further reading and research.

Dysrhythmia refers to an abnormal heartbeat, and chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia are rare conditions characterized by abnormal rhythms in the heart and intestines, respectively. These conditions are often associated with genetic mutations in specific genes, such as the SCN5A gene for atrial dysrhythmia and the ANO1 gene for intestinal dysrhythmia.

Individuals with chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia may experience symptoms such as pain, irregular bowel movements, and a feeling of a racing or “fluttering” heart. The frequency and severity of symptoms can vary greatly among affected individuals.

GARD provides additional resources for patients and families, including support and advocacy organizations that can offer more information and assistance. These organizations may also help individuals connect with other individuals and families affected by these rare conditions.

If you or someone you know has been diagnosed with chronic atrial or intestinal dysrhythmia, GARD can be a valuable source of information and support. Visit the GARD website to learn more about these conditions, associated genes, and available resources.

References:

Patient Support and Advocacy Resources

Patients with chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia often require additional support and information to better understand and manage their condition. Below are some patient support and advocacy resources that can provide assistance:

  • Patient Support Organizations: Several organizations focus on providing support and resources to patients with rare genetic dysrhythmia conditions. These organizations can offer information, educational materials, and community support for patients and their families.
  • Genetic Information Resources: For patients interested in learning more about the genetic causes and inheritance of dysrhythmia, there are a number of reputable genetic resources available. The Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center and Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) provide detailed information on these conditions and associated genes.
  • Scientific Articles: PubMed is a valuable resource for finding scientific articles and research studies related to chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia. Patients can search for articles using keywords such as “atrial dysrhythmia,” “intestinal dysrhythmia,” or the names of specific genes associated with these conditions.
  • Patient Advocacy Groups: Patient advocacy groups play a crucial role in raising awareness about rare diseases and advocating for improved patient care. These groups can provide support, educational resources, and opportunities to connect with other patients and advocate for better treatment options.
  • Pain Management Resources: Chronic dysrhythmia can cause pain and discomfort for patients. Therefore, resources for pain management, such as pain clinics and support groups, may be beneficial for patients seeking additional support and guidance in managing their symptoms.

It is important for patients with chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia to access these resources in order to stay informed about their condition, find support, and advocate for their needs. By utilizing these patient support and advocacy resources, individuals can better navigate the challenges associated with living with this rare condition.

See also  SCARB2 gene

Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM

The catalog from OMIM provides information on various genes and diseases, including chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia. This catalog serves as a valuable resource for patients, healthcare professionals, and researchers alike, offering support and knowledge on rare genetic conditions.

OMIM, also called Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man, is a comprehensive database that compiles scientific information on human genes and the diseases associated with them. It is widely used to learn about genetic causes of various conditions, such as chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia.

The catalog includes names of genes and diseases, their inheritance patterns, and references to scientific publications, such as PubMed. It provides detailed information on the genes responsible for chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia, allowing patients and healthcare professionals to understand the underlying genetic factors.

Chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia refer to a condition where there is an abnormality in the electrical signals that control the normal rhythm of the heart and intestines. This condition can result in symptoms such as irregular heartbeat and abdominal pain.

Genetic mutations in specific genes can contribute to the development of chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia. The OMIM catalog lists these genes and provides additional information on their functions and associations with the condition.

In addition to providing information on genes, the OMIM catalog also includes data on other diseases that may be associated with chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia. This allows researchers and clinicians to explore potential connections and develop a more comprehensive understanding of the condition.

The OMIM catalog is a valuable resource for patients and healthcare professionals who are interested in learning more about chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia. It offers a centralized and reliable source of scientific information, helping individuals make informed decisions about their care and treatment options.

In summary, the catalog of genes and diseases from OMIM provides essential information on chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia and other related conditions. Its comprehensive and up-to-date resources support patients, healthcare professionals, and researchers in their quest to learn more about these rare genetic conditions.

Scientific Articles on PubMed

The condition called chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia, also known as sick sinus syndrome, is associated with abnormal heartbeat control in both the atrial cells of the heart and the intestines. It is a rare condition, but can cause significant pain and discomfort for the patient.

Scientific articles published on PubMed provide more information about these rare dysrhythmias and their causes. Researchers have identified genes that are associated with the inheritance and control of this condition. Additional studies have shown that the condition is more common in certain populations, and gene frequencies can vary.

The OMIM database, a comprehensive catalog of genes and genetic diseases, provides resources and information for advocacy and support for patients with chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia. By learning more about the genes and genetic variations associated with this condition, patients and healthcare providers can better understand the potential causes and treatments.

Several scientific articles published on PubMed provide references and recommended resources for further reading. These articles highlight the importance of genetic testing and counseling for individuals with chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia, as well as the significance of early detection and diagnosis.

In summary, chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia is a rare condition associated with abnormal heartbeat control in both the heart and the intestines. Scientific articles on PubMed provide valuable information about the genes and inheritance patterns associated with this condition, as well as resources and support for patients and healthcare providers.

References