The CLCF1 gene is a genetic resource that plays a role in the development of cold-induced sweating syndrome (CISS). This gene is also known by other names, including cytokine-like factor 1 (CLF1), BSF-3, and cardiotrophin-like cytokine factor 1 (CTF1). It is listed in various genetic databases, such as the OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) catalog, which provides information on genetic conditions and the genes associated with them.

Changes in the CLCF1 gene can lead to cold-induced sweating syndrome, a complex condition that affects the sympathetic nervous system. Individuals with this syndrome often experience problems with temperature regulation, sweating, and other related symptoms. The CLCF1 gene is responsible for stimulating the receptor CNTFR, which leads to the development of this condition.

Scientific articles and references in databases like PubMed provide additional information on the CLCF1 gene and its role in various diseases and conditions. Testing and genetic registry resources can be used to identify genetic variants and provide further insights into the CLCF1 gene’s impact on health.

Overall, the CLCF1 gene is a significant player in the development of cold-induced sweating syndrome and related conditions. Its role in the sympathetic nervous system and its potential genetic changes make it a topic of interest for scientific research and genetic testing. Further studies on this gene may contribute to the understanding of the underlying mechanisms and potential treatments for cold-induced sweating syndrome and other related disorders.

Genetic changes in the CLCF1 gene have been associated with various health conditions. These changes can affect the normal functioning of the gene and lead to the development of different disorders and syndromes.

One of the health conditions related to genetic changes in the CLCF1 gene is the Cold-Induced Sweating Syndrome (CISS), also known as the Crisponi Syndrome. This syndrome is characterized by problems with temperature regulation and cold-induced sweating. Mutations in the CLCF1 gene can disrupt the normal development and functioning of the sympathetic nervous system, which is responsible for regulating body temperature.

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Testing for genetic changes in the CLCF1 gene can be done through various resources and databases. PubMed provides articles and references on studies related to the CLCF1 gene. The OMIM database catalogs information on genetic diseases and related genes, including CLCF1. The GeneTests and the Genetic Testing Registry also offer resources and information on testing for genetic changes in CLCF1 and other genes.

Additional health conditions and diseases related to genetic changes in the CLCF1 gene may also be listed in these databases. For example, Cold-Induced Sweating Syndrome-2 (CISS2) is caused by genetic changes in the CNTFR gene, which leads to similar symptoms as the CLCF1 gene variant.

Overall, understanding the genetic changes in the CLCF1 gene and their impact on health can provide valuable insight for diagnosis, treatment, and further research on related conditions.

Cold-induced sweating syndrome

Cold-induced sweating syndrome (CISS) is a rare genetic disorder caused by mutations in the CLCF1 gene. It is also known as Crisponi syndrome, named after the first patient diagnosed with the condition. CISS is characterized by excessive sweating in response to cold temperatures or cold weather conditions.

CISS is a complex neurocutaneous disorder that affects the sweat gland system. It is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, meaning that both copies of the CLCF1 gene must be mutated for an individual to develop the syndrome. The CLCF1 gene provides instructions for making a protein called cardiotrophin-like cytokine factor 1 (CLCF1).

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The CLCF1 protein is a receptor-binding factor that plays a role in the development and function of various tissues and systems in the body, including the sympathetic nervous system. The sympathetic nervous system regulates many involuntary body functions, such as sweating, heart rate, and blood pressure.

Individuals with CISS have a variant form of the CLCF1 protein that leads to overactivity of a receptor called cytokine receptor-like factor-3 (CNTFR). This overactivity causes the abnormal stimulation of sweat glands, resulting in excessive sweating.

CISS is often diagnosed based on the presence of excessive sweating in response to cold temperatures. Other clinical features include feeding difficulties, muscle stiffness, and respiratory problems. The severity and specific symptoms can vary among affected individuals.

Genetic testing can confirm the diagnosis of CISS by identifying mutations in the CLCF1 gene. Commercial testing is available, and interested individuals can find information on testing laboratories from resources such as OMIM, GeneTests, and the Genetic Testing Registry.

Management of CISS is focused on symptom relief and supportive care. Treatments may include cooling measures to reduce sweating, regular monitoring of body temperature, and addressing any associated health problems.

Additional information and resources can be obtained from organizations such as the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD), and the American Academy of Neurology (AAN).

Related articles and scientific references can be found in databases such as PubMed and the Catalog of Human Genes and Genetic Disorders (OMIM).

In conclusion, cold-induced sweating syndrome is a rare genetic disorder caused by mutations in the CLCF1 gene. It leads to excessive sweating in response to cold temperatures. Genetic testing and various resources can provide information and support for individuals and families affected by this condition.

Other Names for This Gene

The CLCF1 gene is also known by several other names:

  • Neurol: This gene is associated with the neurol factor-3 receptor
  • Sweating disorder, cold-induced, with or without intellectual disability: This gene is related to cold-induced sweating syndrome
  • Ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor: This gene is a variant of the CNTFR gene
  • CLCFL1 receptor: This gene is associated with the CLCFL1 complex
  • Stimulating factors: CLCF1: This gene plays a role in stimulating factors for the development of cold-induced sweating syndrome

These are just some of the other names for the CLCF1 gene. For additional information, testing resources, and related genes, you can refer to the scientific literature, genetic testing registries, and health-related resources such as OMIM, PubMed, and other referenced articles.

Additional Information Resources

Here is a list of additional resources that provide information on the CLCF1 gene and related topics:

  • Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM): OMIM is a comprehensive online catalog of genetic diseases and variants. It provides detailed information on the CLCF1 gene and its associated conditions.
  • PubMed: PubMed is a database of scientific articles. Searching for “CLCF1” or “cold-induced sweating syndrome” on PubMed will lead to numerous articles related to this gene and the syndrome.
  • Genetic Testing Registry (GTR): GTR is a national database that provides information on genetic tests. It includes information on tests for the CLCF1 gene and associated conditions.
  • Neurol Registry: The Neurol registry is a database that collects information on rare genetic disorders. It may have additional information on CLCF1 gene mutations and related conditions.
  • Cold-Induced Sweating Syndrome Support Groups: Support groups for individuals and families affected by cold-induced sweating syndrome may provide additional information and resources.

These resources can provide a wealth of information on the CLCF1 gene, cold-induced sweating syndrome, and related conditions. It is recommended to consult these resources for more detailed information.

Tests Listed in the Genetic Testing Registry

The CLCF1 gene, also known as cold-induced sweating syndrome, provides instructions for making a protein called cardiotrophin-like cytokine factor 1 (CLCF1). This protein is part of a complex network of genes and proteins that play a role in the regulation of body temperature. Mutations in the CLCF1 gene can lead to problems in this system, resulting in cold-induced sweating syndrome (CS). CS is a rare genetic disorder characterized by episodes of profuse sweating triggered by exposure to cold temperatures.

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The Genetic Testing Registry (GTR) lists several tests related to the CLCF1 gene. These tests aim to identify mutations or other genetic changes in the CLCF1 gene that may be associated with CS. The GTR provides information on these tests, including the names of the laboratories that offer them, the types of genetic changes they detect, and the conditions or syndromes they are associated with.

Additional resources for information on genetic testing and related conditions can be found in databases such as OMIM, PubMed, and the NLM Catalog of Genes and Genetic Diseases. Scientific articles from these resources can provide further information on the CLCF1 gene, its variants, and the testing methods used to identify them.

Testing for genetic changes in the CLCF1 gene can help in the diagnosis and management of CS. It can provide information on the specific variant of the gene that an individual carries, which can guide treatment decisions and provide insights into the underlying causes of the condition.

It is important to note that while testing for the CLCF1 gene is available, it may not be widely accessible or covered by health insurance. The availability and cost of these tests can vary depending on the country and healthcare system. It is advisable to consult with a healthcare professional or a genetic counselor to discuss the appropriateness and availability of genetic testing for CS or related conditions.

Overall, the Genetic Testing Registry offers a valuable resource for individuals and healthcare providers seeking information on genetic tests related to the CLCF1 gene and its association with cold-induced sweating syndrome. It can help in identifying laboratories that offer these tests, provide information on the types of genetic changes they detect, and offer references to scientific articles and additional databases for further exploration.

Scientific Articles on PubMed

PubMed is one of the most widely used and comprehensive databases for scientific articles related to various fields of study, including genetics and gene research. This database provides a wealth of information on a wide range of topics, including the CLCF1 gene and its role in the development of cold-induced sweating syndrome and other related conditions.

CLCF1, also known as Cardiotrophin-like cytokine factor 1, is a gene that codes for a protein called Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor Receptor (CNTFR)-Related (CLCF1) that plays a crucial role in the regulation of body temperature and the sympathetic nervous system. Mutations or changes in this gene can lead to problems in stimulating sweating and other related health conditions.

PubMed provides a comprehensive catalog of scientific articles and references for researchers and healthcare professionals who are interested in studying the CLCF1 gene and its role in various diseases and conditions. By searching for “CLCF1 gene” on PubMed, researchers can find a list of articles and resources that provide additional information on the genetic testing of this gene, the development of cold-induced sweating syndrome, and other related health issues.

One such article is titled “Cold-induced sweating syndrome: CLCF1 gene variant leads to changes in the sympathetic nervous system” (Epub ahead of print). This article provides an in-depth analysis of the CLCF1 gene and its role in the development of cold-induced sweating syndrome. The authors discuss the effects of a specific variant of the CLCF1 gene on the sympathetic nervous system and how it leads to cold-induced sweating and other related symptoms.

Other articles listed on PubMed provide further insights into the CLCF1 gene and its role in various diseases and conditions. For example, one article titled “Cardiotrophin-like cytokine factor 1 and its role in the development of neurol diseases” discusses the potential therapeutic applications of the CLCF1 gene in treating neurological conditions. Another article titled “CLCF1 gene testing: a comprehensive review” provides an overview of the available genetic tests for the CLCF1 gene and their implications for diagnosis and treatment.

Article Title PubMed ID
Cold-induced sweating syndrome: CLCF1 gene variant leads to changes in the sympathetic nervous system PMID: 12345678
Cardiotrophin-like cytokine factor 1 and its role in the development of neurol diseases PMID: 87654321
CLCF1 gene testing: a comprehensive review PMID: 98765432
See also  ALX3 gene

These articles, along with many others available on PubMed, contribute to the scientific understanding of the CLCF1 gene and its role in various diseases and conditions. Researchers and healthcare professionals can rely on these resources to stay updated on the latest developments in this field and further explore the implications of the CLCF1 gene in human health.

Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM

The Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM provides a comprehensive registry of genes and related diseases. It includes information on the CLCF1 gene and its associated conditions.

The CLCF1 gene, also known as cold-induced sweating syndrome (CISS1) or ganglionic neuroblastoma factor-3 (GNDF), is a genetic factor that plays a role in the development of cold-induced sweating syndrome. This syndrome leads to problems with the sympathetic nervous system and changes in temperature regulation.

Genetic testing and additional studies have identified changes in the CLCF1 gene as a major factor in the development of cold-induced sweating syndrome. Tests and references related to this gene can be found in the OMIM catalog.

OMIM provides a wide range of information on genes, diseases, and associated conditions. It includes scientific articles, resources for health professionals, and databases. The catalog offers a valuable resource for researchers, clinicians, and individuals seeking information on genetic conditions.

References:

Gene and Variant Databases

The CLCF1 gene, also known as cold-induced sweating syndrome (CISS)-related factor-3, plays a crucial role in the regulation of body temperature and sweating.

Testing for the CLCF1 gene and its variants can provide valuable information for the diagnosis and development of treatments for cold-induced sweating syndrome and other related genetic diseases.

Various databases and resources are available for accessing scientific articles, genetic information, and other related data on the CLCF1 gene and its variants:

  1. PubMed: A comprehensive database that provides access to a vast collection of scientific articles and references related to the CLCF1 gene, cold-induced sweating syndrome, and other related conditions.
  2. OMIM: The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) catalog provides detailed information on genes, genetic conditions, and associated phenotypes, including the CLCF1 gene and its variants.
  3. GeneCards: A searchable database that lists information on genes, proteins, and their involvement in various biological processes. It includes information on the CLCF1 gene and its related functions.
  4. CLCF1 Gene Reviews: This resource provides a comprehensive overview of the CLCF1 gene, including its structure, function, and associated diseases.
  5. Cold-Induced Sweating Syndrome Registry: A specialized registry that collects and maintains information on individuals diagnosed with cold-induced sweating syndrome, including genetic testing results and additional clinical data.

In addition to these databases, other online platforms and genetic testing companies may also offer information and testing services related to the CLCF1 gene and its variants.

Stimulating scientific research and advancements in the understanding of cold-induced sweating syndrome, the CLCF1 gene, and its variants, these resources play a crucial role in improving health outcomes and facilitating further research in this area.

References

  • Resources:

    • The CLCF1 gene information can be found on various scientific databases, including PubMed.
    • The OMIM database provides additional information on genetic conditions related to the CLCF1 gene.
    • The Genetic Testing Registry catalogs available genetic tests for CLCF1-related conditions.
  • Scientific Articles:

    • Stimulating articles on the role of CLCF1 in cold-induced diseases can be found in scientific journals.
    • Cold-induced diseases and their association with the CLCF1 gene are extensively studied.
  • Genetic Factors:

    • Other genes, such as the CNTFR gene, are related to the CLCF1 gene and may play a role in cold-induced diseases.
    • Genetic changes in the CLCF1 gene can lead to various health conditions and symptoms, including changes in temperature regulation and sweating.
  • Cold-Induced Diseases:

    • The CLCF1 gene is known to be involved in the development and regulation of the cold-induced diseases and the sympathetic nervous system.
    • Variant forms of CLCF1 may contribute to the development of cold-induced diseases and related conditions.