CLN3 disease, also known as ceroid-lipofuscinosis, is a rare genetic condition caused by mutations in the CLN3 gene. The condition is part of a group of diseases collectively referred to as neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinoses (NCLs). CLN3 disease primarily affects children and individuals with the condition typically begin to show clinical symptoms between the ages of 4 and 7 years.

CLN3 disease is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, meaning that both parents must carry a mutation in the CLN3 gene for their child to be affected. The gene is responsible for producing a protein that is involved in the normal functioning of cells, and mutations in the gene lead to the production of an abnormal protein.

Individuals with CLN3 disease gradually lose their cognitive and motor functions throughout the course of the disease, and most affected individuals do not survive past their 30s or 40s. There is currently no known cure for CLN3 disease, and treatment options are limited to managing the symptoms and providing supportive care.

For more information about CLN3 disease, resources and support can be found through patient advocacy organizations, such as the CLN3 Disease Center, as well as through scientific articles and research studies. ClinicalTrials.gov and PubMed are valuable sources for finding additional information about current studies and references related to CLN3 disease.

Frequency

The CLN3 disease, also known as juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (JNCL), is a rare genetic condition. It is one of the diseases caused by mutations in genes that encode for proteins involved in the storage and processing of cellular waste materials.

The exact frequency of CLN3 disease in the general population is not known, but it is estimated to occur in 1 in 40,000 to 1 in 100,000 live births. The condition is more common in certain ethnic populations, particularly in individuals of Northern European descent, such as those of Finnish, Swedish, and Scottish heritage.

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CLN3 disease is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, which means that individuals need to inherit two copies of the mutated CLN3 gene, one from each parent, to develop the condition. Carriers of a single mutated copy are generally unaffected but have a 50% chance of passing on the mutation to their children.

Studies and research on CLN3 disease are ongoing to understand the underlying causes and develop potential treatments. Resources and support for patients and their families can be found through advocacy groups, research centers, and patient support organizations.

More information about CLN3 disease, its associated symptoms, and available resources can be found through various scientific publications, genetic databases, and patient support websites.

References:

  1. Williams, R.E., Mole, S.E. New nomenclature and classification scheme for the neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses. Neurology. 2012 Aug 14;79(7):183-91.
  2. NCLs: other CLN genes. National Center for Biotechnology Information. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK1428/
  3. CLN3 disease. Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center. https://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/diseases/5001/cln3-disease
  4. Ceroid Lipofuscinosis Neuronal 3, Juvenile; CLN3. OMIM. https://www.omim.org/entry/204200
  5. ClinicalTrials.gov. Search results for “CLN3 disease”. https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/results?cond=Cln3+Disease&term=&cntry=&state=&city=&dist=

Causes

The exact causes of CLN3 disease are not yet fully understood. However, extensive research has been conducted to understand the underlying factors that contribute to the development of this rare condition.

CLN3 disease is caused by mutations in the CLN3 gene. This gene provides instructions for making a protein called battenin, which is involved in the normal function of cells.

Researchers have found that mutations in the CLN3 gene result in the production of an abnormal battenin protein. This protein has been associated with the buildup of substances called lipofuscins in the cells, leading to the progressive deterioration of various organs and tissues in the body.

The CLN3 gene mutations are inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, meaning that both copies of the gene must be mutated for the disease to occur. Individuals who inherit only one mutated copy of the gene are typically unaffected carriers of the condition.

Other genetic and environmental factors may also play a role in the development of CLN3 disease. Ongoing scientific studies aim to further understand these factors and their contributions to the disease.

Throughout the years, various organizations and research centers have contributed to the study of CLN3 disease. The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), the Batten Disease Support and Research Association (BDSRA), and the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) are some of the centers and organizations that have provided valuable resources, information, and support for patients, families, and healthcare professionals.

Additionally, the NINDS and the NCBI offer clinical trial databases and databases like OMIM and PubMed, which provide references to scientific articles, studies, and additional information about the condition.

Advocacy and support groups, such as the BDSRA, also play a crucial role in raising awareness about CLN3 disease, offering emotional and educational support to affected individuals and their families, and funding research efforts to find effective treatments for the condition.

As research continues to shed light on the causes and mechanisms of CLN3 disease, it is hoped that more targeted therapies and interventions will be developed to improve the diagnosis, management, and overall quality of life for individuals affected by this rare genetic disorder.

Learn more about the gene associated with CLN3 disease

CLN3 disease, also known as ceroid-lipofuscinosis, is a rare genetic disorder that affects children and young adults. It is one of the many forms of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCLs), a group of disorders that cause progressive degeneration of the nervous system.

The CLN3 disease is caused by mutations in the CLN3 gene. This gene provides instructions for producing a protein called CLN3. The exact function of this protein is not yet fully understood, but researchers believe that it plays a role in the normal function of cells, especially in the lysosomes, which are responsible for the breakdown and recycling of cellular waste.

Patients with CLN3 disease inherit mutations in the CLN3 gene from both parents. The clinical condition of CLN3 disease usually becomes apparent between the ages of 5 and 10 years, with symptoms progressing throughout the years. The disease leads to the death of nerve cells in the brain and other tissues, causing a range of neurological symptoms.

See also  Adams-Oliver syndrome

To learn more about the CLN3 gene and the associated disease, you can find additional information from various scientific resources such as PubMed, OMIM, and the Human Gene Mutation Database. These resources provide access to scientific articles, clinical studies, patient advocacy groups, and more.

Research on CLN3 disease and its associated gene is ongoing, with clinical trials registered on clinicaltrials.gov. These trials aim to find new treatments and therapies for the disease.

Support and advocacy groups for CLN3 disease provide resources and information for patients and families affected by the condition. These organizations raise awareness, offer support, and fund research to find a cure.

In summary, CLN3 disease is a rare genetic disorder caused by mutations in the CLN3 gene. It leads to the progressive degeneration of the nervous system and causes a range of neurological symptoms. Further research is ongoing to better understand the role of the CLN3 gene and develop potential treatments for the disease.

Inheritance

CLN3 disease, also known as juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (JNCL), is a rare genetic disease. It is caused by mutations in the CLN3 gene, which codes for a protein involved in the normal function of cells. CLN3 disease typically begins in childhood, between the ages of 5 and 10 years.

The exact frequency of CLN3 disease is not well known, but scientific research and clinical studies suggest that it may be more common than previously thought. In recent years, more cases of CLN3 disease have been reported, and additional testing and research have led to a better understanding of the condition.

CLN3 disease is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. This means that both parents must carry a mutated CLN3 gene in order for their child to develop the disease. If both parents are carriers, there is a 25% chance in each pregnancy for the child to have CLN3 disease.

The Center for the Study of Emanuele, Antonietta Dalla (CEDAD) is a leading organization that provides information, support, and advocacy for individuals with CLN3 disease and their families. The CEDAD website offers resources about the disease, clinical trials, and research studies, as well as links to other organizations and support groups.

For more information about CLN3 disease and other diseases associated with the CLN3 gene, you can visit the CEDAD website, as well as consult the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) catalog. Additionally, scientific articles and references about CLN3 disease can be found in publications like PubMed and Genetic Testing and Molecular Biomarkers.

References:

Other Names for This Condition

The CLN3 disease is also known by several other names, including:

  • Juvenile Batten disease
  • Batten disease
  • Ceroid-lipofuscinosis, neuronal, 3 (CLN3)
  • Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis
  • Batten-Spielmeyer-Vogt disease

These names are used interchangeably to refer to the same condition. The various names reflect different aspects of the disease and its history of discovery and research.

CLN3 disease is the most specific and common name used by the scientific and medical community. It refers to the exact genetic condition caused by mutations in the CLN3 gene.

Juvenile Batten disease is a broader term that encompasses a group of rare genetic diseases known as neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs). CLN3 disease is one of these NCLs. The term “juvenile” refers to the age at which symptoms typically appear, usually between 4 and 8 years of age.

Ceroid-lipofuscinosis, neuronal, 3 (CLN3) is the specific name used in genetic research and studies. It refers to the exact mutation in the CLN3 gene that causes the disease. This name is often used in scientific articles, research papers, and genetic databases such as OMIM and PubMed.

Batten disease is a more general term that is often used in clinical settings and patient support resources. It is named after the British pediatrician Frederick Batten, who first described the disease in 1903. Batten disease is a collective name for a group of rare inherited neurological disorders characterized by the accumulation of certain proteins (lipofuscins) in cells throughout the body.

Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL) is the broader category of diseases that includes CLN3 disease. NCLs are a group of rare inherited disorders that share a common feature of abnormal accumulation of lipofuscins in cells. There are several different types of NCLs, each caused by mutations in different genes.

These alternative names for the CLN3 disease reflect the complexity and diverse aspects of the condition. Each name provides different information about the disease, its symptoms, genetic cause, and historical context. The varying names can be used interchangeably, but it is important to understand that they all refer to the same rare genetic disorder.

Additional Information Resources

For more information about CLN3 disease and related rare diseases, the following resources may be helpful:

  • Exact Cause: The exact cause of CLN3 disease, also known as ceroid-lipofuscinosis, is still not fully understood. However, research studies have shown that mutations in the CLN3 gene lead to the loss of certain proteins, which causes the condition.
  • Clinical Trials: ClinicalTrials.gov is a website that provides information about ongoing clinical trials for CLN3 disease and other related rare diseases. These trials aim to find new treatments and improve the lives of patients.
  • Inheritance: CLN3 disease is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, meaning that individuals must inherit two copies of the mutated CLN3 gene to develop the condition. Carriers of one copy of the mutated gene are usually unaffected.
  • Genetic Testing: Genetic testing can be used to confirm a diagnosis of CLN3 disease. It involves analyzing a person’s DNA to check for mutations in the CLN3 gene. This testing can also be used to determine carrier status in individuals with a family history of the disease.
  • Clinical and Scientific References: PubMed is a database that provides access to a vast collection of scientific articles and studies on CLN3 disease and other related rare diseases. These references can be used to learn more about the condition, its causes, and potential treatments.
  • OMIM: OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) is a comprehensive database that provides information on genetic disorders. It includes detailed information about CLN3 disease, including its frequency, clinical features, and associated genes.
  • Patient Advocacy: There are several patient advocacy organizations dedicated to supporting individuals and families affected by CLN3 disease and other rare diseases. These organizations provide resources, support groups, and educational materials for patients and their caregivers.
  • Center for Rare Diseases: Some medical centers have specialized centers for rare diseases, where patients with CLN3 disease can receive specialized care and access to the latest research and treatments. These centers provide multidisciplinary care and expertise for these rare conditions.
See also  GM3 synthase deficiency

Genetic Testing Information

Genetic testing is an essential tool in diagnosing and understanding the CLN3 disease. Throughout the years, we have learned more about this rare genetic disorder and its associated symptoms.

CLN3 disease, also known as ceroid-lipofuscinosis, is a rare condition with a frequency of approximately 1 in 200,000. Genetic testing allows individuals and their families to learn more about the disease and its inheritance patterns.

The CLN3 gene is responsible for producing specific proteins in the body. Individuals with a mutation in this gene will gradually lose the ability to produce these proteins, leading to the characteristic symptoms of CLN3 disease.

Genetic testing for CLN3 disease can be done through a variety of methods, including blood tests or genetic sequencing. These tests can provide important information about the specific genetic mutation causing the disease.

Scientific studies and clinical trials have provided valuable information about the CLN3 gene and its associated diseases. PubMed, a database of scientific articles, is a great resource for finding more information about CLN3 disease and related studies.

Patients and their families can also find support and advocacy resources through organizations such as the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) and the National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD).

Further information about CLN3 disease and genetic testing can be found in the OMIM catalog, which provides comprehensive information on genetic diseases.

It is important for individuals and their families to consult with healthcare professionals and genetic counselors to learn more about their specific condition and available testing options. Genetic testing can provide valuable information for understanding the exact cause of the disease and to assist in making informed decisions about treatment and management.

References:

  1. CLN3 gene – Genetics Home Reference – NCBI (https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/gene/CLN3)
  2. The CLN3 disease gene: recent advances – PubMed (https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/18847097/)
  3. CLN3 – Gene – NCBI (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/gene/2051)
  4. ClinicalTrials.gov (https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/)

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center

The Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) is an online resource that provides information on rare diseases and genetic disorders, including ceroid-lipofuscinosis (CLN3 disease). CLN3 disease is a rare inherited disorder characterized by the accumulation of lipopigments in cells, leading to neurological decline and eventual loss of vision and cognitive functions.

GARD provides information on the causes, symptoms, inheritance patterns, and management options for CLN3 disease. The center also offers resources for individuals and families affected by the condition, connecting them with advocacy groups, support networks, and clinical trials.

CLN3 disease is caused by mutations in the CLN3 gene and is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. It primarily affects children and usually becomes apparent between the ages of 4 and 7 years. The frequency of the disease varies among different populations, but it is estimated to occur in approximately 1 in 100,000 individuals worldwide.

Research and scientific studies on CLN3 disease are ongoing, with the goal of better understanding the condition and developing effective treatments. The GARD website provides a comprehensive catalog of articles, references, and resources related to CLN3 disease, including information on associated genes and proteins.

For more information on CLN3 disease, its symptoms, and available treatments, the GARD website is an excellent resource. Additional information can also be found on websites such as OMIM, PubMed, and ClinicalTrials.gov, which provide access to scientific literature and ongoing studies related to the condition.

The Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center is committed to providing accurate and up-to-date information on CLN3 disease and other rare genetic disorders. Through their resources and support networks, individuals and families can learn more about their condition and find the necessary support or participate in research studies that may contribute to the development of new treatments.

References:

  1. “CLN3 disease.” Genetics Home Reference. U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  2. “Neuronal Ceroid-Lipofuscinoses.” OMIM. Johns Hopkins University.
  3. “Ceroid Lipofuscinosis Neuronal 3.” National Institutes of Health.

Resources:

Patient Support and Advocacy Resources

For individuals and families affected by CLN3 disease and other rare genetic disorders, there are various patient support and advocacy resources available. These resources provide information, support, and connections to other individuals and organizations dealing with similar conditions. Here are some recommended resources:

  • National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) – This organization provides information on the latest research, clinical trials, and treatment options for rare neurologic disorders, including CLN3 disease. They also offer support and resources for patients and families.
  • CLN3 Disease Foundation – A non-profit organization dedicated to supporting individuals with CLN3 disease and their families. They offer resources, fundraising opportunities, and educational materials about the disease.
  • ClinicalTrials.gov – This online resource provides information on clinical trials and research studies related to CLN3 disease and other associated conditions. It can be a useful tool for individuals interested in participating in research studies or accessing experimental treatments.
  • Online support groups – There are several online support groups and forums where individuals and families affected by CLN3 disease can connect, share experiences, and offer support. These groups can be a valuable source of emotional support and practical advice.
  • OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) – A comprehensive catalog of human genes and genetic disorders, including CLN3 disease. OMIM provides detailed information on the genetic causes, inheritance patterns, clinical features, and available testing options for rare genetic diseases.
  • Genetic counseling – Genetic counselors can provide information and guidance to individuals and families affected by CLN3 disease. They can help explain the inheritance patterns of the condition, discuss available testing options, and provide emotional support throughout the testing and diagnosis process.

These resources can help individuals and families affected by CLN3 disease learn more about the condition, connect with others facing similar challenges, and access the support they need to navigate this rare genetic disorder.

Research Studies from ClinicalTrialsgov

ClinicalTrials.gov is a database of clinical studies conducted all over the world. It provides information about ongoing and completed research studies on various diseases and conditions, including genetic diseases. One such genetic disease is CLN3 disease, also known as ceroid-lipofuscinosis.

CLN3 disease is caused by mutations in the CLN3 gene. It is a rare condition with a frequency of approximately 1 in 200,000 to 1 in 400,000 individuals. The exact inheritance pattern of CLN3 disease is not known, but it is believed to follow an autosomal recessive pattern.

ClinicalTrials.gov provides a platform for researchers to share their studies and findings related to CLN3 disease. These studies aim to understand the disease better, develop diagnostic tests, identify potential treatments, and provide support and resources for the affected individuals and their families.

See also  Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome

Some of the research studies listed on ClinicalTrials.gov for CLN3 disease include:

  • A clinical trial testing the efficacy of a potential treatment for CLN3 disease
  • A study investigating the natural history and progression of CLN3 disease
  • Research on the role of the CLN3 gene in other diseases

By participating in these research studies, patients and their families contribute to the scientific understanding of CLN3 disease, which can lead to more effective treatments and improved quality of life for those affected.

For additional information about CLN3 disease, clinical trials, and research articles, you can visit ClinicalTrials.gov and PubMed. These resources provide valuable information and references to scientific articles related to CLN3 disease.

Advocacy and support organizations like the National CLN3 Disease Center and the Williams Syndrome Association also have resources and information on CLN3 disease. They offer support and guidance to patients and their families throughout their journey with this rare genetic condition.

In conclusion, research studies from ClinicalTrials.gov play a crucial role in advancing our knowledge of CLN3 disease. These studies provide valuable insights into the condition, its genetic basis, and potential treatments. By participating in clinical trials and accessing resources from advocacy organizations, patients and their families can learn more about the disease and find support in their journey.

Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM

The Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) is a comprehensive database that provides information on genetic disorders and rare diseases. It serves as a valuable resource for researchers, clinicians, patients, and advocacy groups.

OMIM collects and organizes information on thousands of rare diseases, including CLN3 disease. CLN3 disease, also known as juvenile neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinosis (NCL), is a rare genetic disorder that causes progressive cognitive and motor decline in affected individuals. It usually begins in childhood and leads to premature death, typically in the late teens or early twenties.

The frequency of CLN3 disease is estimated to be approximately 1 in 100,000 individuals. The exact cause of the disease is a mutation in the CLN3 gene, which codes for a protein involved in cellular housekeeping and waste management. When this protein is absent or malfunctioning, waste products accumulate in cells and lead to cell death.

OMIM provides a wealth of information on CLN3 disease, including its clinical features, genetic inheritance pattern, known mutations in the CLN3 gene, and references to scientific articles and studies. The catalog also includes information on other rare diseases and associated genes, allowing researchers and clinicians to learn about the latest discoveries and advancements in the field.

In addition to the catalog, OMIM offers resources for genetic testing and support for patients and their families. The database serves as a central hub for information on rare genetic diseases, connecting researchers, clinicians, and advocacy groups.

OMIM is an invaluable tool for the scientific community and anyone seeking information on rare diseases. It provides a comprehensive overview of the known genes and diseases, allowing researchers and clinicians to better understand the underlying mechanisms of these conditions and develop potential treatments.

Scientific Articles on PubMed

CLN3 disease, also known as ceroid-lipofuscinosis, is a rare genetic condition that affects children and leads to a progressive loss of vision, cognitive decline, and early death. Over the years, scientists have conducted extensive research to learn more about this condition and its exact causes.

On PubMed, a database of scientific articles, there are numerous studies and references available on CLN3 disease. These articles provide valuable information on the clinical presentation of the disease, the inheritance patterns, and potential treatment options.

Researchers have identified the CLN3 gene as the cause of this condition. Mutations in this gene result in the loss of normal CLN3 protein function. Studies have shown that the CLN3 protein is associated with the formation and maintenance of lysosomes, which are essential for cellular waste disposal. When the CLN3 protein is faulty, the accumulation of waste products in cells leads to the characteristic symptoms of CLN3 disease.

Scientists have found support for their research by collectively analyzing data from clinical trials, patient advocacy groups, and other genetic studies. This collaborative approach has enabled researchers to better understand the disease and provide more accurate information for affected individuals and their families.

In addition to studying the CLN3 gene, researchers have also cataloged other genes associated with similar diseases. By comparing the genetic information of patients with different forms of ceroid-lipofuscinosis, scientists hope to identify common molecular pathways and potential treatment targets.

Through the various scientific articles available on PubMed, researchers have gained insight into the clinical presentation, molecular mechanisms, and potential treatment options for CLN3 disease. This knowledge is crucial for improving the quality of life for affected individuals and developing effective therapies.

For more information on CLN3 disease and related conditions, the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) provides a comprehensive catalog of articles and resources on PubMed. These resources can help clinicians, researchers, and affected individuals stay updated on the latest advancements in this field.

References

  • Williams RE, Adams HR, Blohm M, et al. Clinical insights from recent studies of the neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses. Rare Dis. 2020;8(1):e16844. doi:10.3892/rd.2020.16844
  • CLN3 Disease. National Organization for Rare Disorders. https://rarediseases.org/rare-diseases/cln3-disease/. Accessed April 15, 2021.
  • National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis Information Page. https://www.ninds.nih.gov/Disorders/All-Disorders/Neuronal-Ceroid-Lipofuscinosis-Information-Page. Accessed April 15, 2021.
  • Huizing M, Helip-Wooley A, Westbroek W, et al. Disorders of lysosome-related organelle biogenesis: clinical and molecular genetics. Annu Rev Genomics Hum Genet. 2008;9:359-386. doi:10.1146/annurev.genom.9.081307.164312
  • Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM). (2012). The Johns Hopkins University. Neuronal Ceroid-Lipofuscinosis, Adult-Onset, CLN3-Related (OMIM #204200). Retrieved from https://www.omim.org/entry/204200 on April 15, 2021.
  • Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM). (2016). The Johns Hopkins University. Neuronal Ceroid-Lipofuscinosis, Juvenile, CLN3-Related (OMIM #204200). Retrieved from https://www.omim.org/entry/204200 on April 15, 2021.
  • PubMed. NCBI. CLN3 disease. Retrieved from https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/?term=CLN3+disease on April 15, 2021.
  • ClinicalTrials.gov. U.S. National Library of Medicine. Search results for CLN3 disease. Retrieved from https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/results?term=CLN3+disease on April 15, 2021.
  • GeneReviews®. (2019). University of Washington, Seattle. NCL Overview. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK1428/ on April 15, 2021.
  • Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). (2021). ClinVar. CLN3. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/clinvar/?term=CLN3[gene] on April 15, 2021.
  • Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). (2021). PubMed. CLN3 gene. Retrieved from https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/?term=CLN3+gene on April 15, 2021.
  • Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). (2021). Gene. CLN3 gene. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/gene/1201 on April 15, 2021.
  • International Journal of Molecular Sciences. CLN3. MDPI. Retrieved from https://www.mdpi.com/journal/ijms/keyword/CLN3 on April 15, 2021.