Durvalumab Injection

Durvalumab is used alone to treat non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that spread to nearby tissues and cannot be removed by surgery but has not worsened after being treated with other chemotherapy medications and radiation treatments. It is also used in combination with tremelimumab-actl (Imjudo) and platinum-based chemotherapy to treat a certain type of NSCLC that has spread throughout the lungs and to other parts of the body. Durvalumab injection is also used in combination with chemotherapy agents to treat extensive-stage small cell lung cancer (ES-SCLC) in adults whose cancer has spread throughout the lungs and to other parts of the body. It is also used in combination with chemotherapy agents to treat biliary tract cancer (BTC; cancer in the organs and ducts that make and store bile, the liquid made by the liver) in adults whose cancer has spread to nearby tissues or to other parts of the body. Durvalumab is also used in combination with tremelimumab-actl to treat hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC; a type of liver cancer) that cannot be treated with surgery. Durvalumab injection is in a class of medications called monoclonal antibodies. It works by helping your immune system to slow or stop the growth of cancer cells.

🔔 How should this medicine be used?

Durvalumab injection comes as a liquid to be injected into a vein over 60 minutes by a doctor or nurse in a hospital or medical facility. It is usually injected once every 2 weeks, once every 3 weeks, or once every 4 weeks for as long as your doctor recommends you receive treatment. The dosing schedule depends on the type of cancer you have and how your body responds to the medication.

Durvalumab injection may cause serious or life-threatening reactions during an infusion. A doctor or nurse will watch you closely while you are receiving the infusion and shortly after the infusion to be sure you are not having a serious reaction to the medication. Tell your doctor or nurse immediately if you experience any of the following symptoms that may occur during or after the infusion: chills or shaking, itching, rash, flushing, difficulty breathing, wheezing, dizziness, fever, feeling faint, back or neck pain, or swelling of your face.

Your doctor may slow down your infusion, delay or stop your treatment with durvalumab injection, or treat you with additional medications depending on your response to the medication and any side effects that you experience. Talk to your doctor about how you are feeling during your treatment.

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