Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB) is a rare genetic condition that affects the skin and nails. It is characterized by the formation of blisters and erosions on the skin, especially on the hands and feet. The condition also affects the nails, causing them to become brittle and deformed.

DEB is caused by mutations in the COL7A1 gene, which is responsible for the production of a protein called type VII collagen. This protein is essential for the structure and function of the dermis, the layer of skin below the epidermis. In individuals with DEB, the altered gene leads to a deficiency or absence of type VII collagen, resulting in the fragile skin and nails associated with the condition.

There are several types of DEB, classified based on the severity of symptoms and inheritance pattern. The most common types include dominant dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DDEB) and recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB). DDEB is less severe and usually affects the nails and mucous membranes. RDEB is more severe and can affect the entire body, including the internal organs.

DEB is a chronic condition that is present from birth. The signs and symptoms of DEB can vary widely, ranging from mild blistering to severe, life-threatening complications. In some cases, the condition can increase the risk of developing a type of skin cancer called squamous cell carcinoma.

There is currently no cure for DEB. Treatment focuses on managing the symptoms and preventing complications. This may include wound care, pain management, and physical therapy. Genetic testing is available to confirm the diagnosis of DEB and to determine the specific genetic mutation associated with the condition.

Support and advocacy resources for individuals with DEB and their families are available through organizations such as the Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa Research Association (DEBRA) and the Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa Research Center (DEBRC). These organizations provide information, support, and resources to help individuals with DEB and their families learn more about the condition and connect with others affected by it.

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References:

1. PubMed – Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa

2. OMIM – Epidermolysis Bullosa Dystrophica

3. Seattle Children’s – Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa

4. ClinicalTrials.gov – Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa

Frequency

Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB) is a rare inherited condition characterized by the formation of blisters on the skin and mucous membranes. It is caused by mutations in genes involved in the structure and function of collagen, a protein that helps to provide strength and elasticity to the skin and other tissues.

The frequency of DEB varies depending on the specific type of the condition. The two major types of DEB are generalized dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) and recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB). RDEB is the most severe form of DEB and has an estimated incidence of 1 in 50,000 to 1 in 100,000 births. On the other hand, the incidence of RDEB is higher, ranging from 1 in 20,000 to 1 in 250,000 births.

DEB is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, which means that an individual must inherit two copies of the altered gene, one from each parent, to develop the condition. If both parents are carriers of a DEB-causing gene mutation, each of their children will have a 25 percent chance of being affected.

Signs and symptoms of DEB can vary widely depending on the specific type and severity of the condition. Common features include blistering and scarring of the skin, nail dystrophy (abnormal growth or development of the nails), and hand involvement with loss of fingers or other deformities. In some cases, blistering can also occur in the mucous membranes, such as the inside of the mouth and the lining of the gastrointestinal tract.

There are several resources available for individuals and families affected by DEB. The Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa Research Association of America (debra of America) provides support, advocacy, and educational resources for individuals and families living with the condition. The National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) is also a valuable resource for information about DEB and other related conditions.

Additional information about DEB, including clinical trials and genetic testing resources, can be found on websites such as OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) and PubMed (a database of scientific articles). The ClinicalTrials.gov website may also have information about ongoing clinical trials investigating potential treatments or interventions for DEB.

Causes

Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB) is a rare genetic condition caused by mutations in the COL7A1 gene, which provides instructions for making type VII collagen. Type VII collagen is an important protein that helps anchor the layers of skin together. Mutations in this gene result in a reduced or altered production of type VII collagen, leading to the fragile and easily blistered skin characteristic of DEB.

DEB is generally inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern, which means that an affected individual must inherit a copy of the mutated gene from both parents. However, in some cases, DEB can be inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern, where a single copy of the mutated gene is sufficient to cause the condition.

The specific types of DEB are classified based on the severity of the symptoms and the regions of the body affected by the blisters. The most severe form, known as recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB), is associated with widespread blistering and scarring that can affect the skin, mucous membranes, and nails.

The altered collagen structure in DEB can also affect other parts of the body, such as the eyes, teeth, and internal organs. Individuals with DEB may experience additional health issues, including dental problems, eye abnormalities, difficulty swallowing, and an increased risk of developing certain types of cancer.

Research and clinical trials are ongoing to better understand the causes of DEB, improve diagnosis and testing methods, and develop potential treatments. Resources such as ClinicalTrials.gov, PubMed, and OMIM provide scientific articles and information on current research studies and available support and advocacy resources for patients and their families.

Learn more about the gene associated with Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa

Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB) is a rare genetic condition characterized by the formation of blisters and sores on the skin. It is caused by altered genes involved in the structure and function of the skin.

See also  KCNH2 gene

One of the genes associated with DEB is called COL7A1. Research and testing have shown that alterations in this gene can cause different types and severity of DEB. COL7A1 provides instructions for producing a protein called collagen type VII, which is important for the strength and integrity of the skin.

COL7A1 alterations can be inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, meaning that an individual must inherit two altered copies of the gene, one from each parent, to develop DEB. The frequency of COL7A1 alterations varies among different populations.

DEB can be classified into different types based on the severity and distribution of symptoms. The two major types are dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa dystrophica (DEB-D) and generalized severe recessive DEB (DEB-RDEB).

In individuals with DEB-D, blisters mainly occur on the hands, feet, knees, and elbows, and can also affect the nails. In DEB-RDEB, blisters can appear all over the body, including the mucous membranes and internal organs.

There are currently additional genes being researched that may be associated with DEB. As more scientific articles and studies are published, additional information about the genetics of DEB will become available.

References:

  1. OMIM: https://www.omim.org/entry/226600
  2. PubMed: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/?term=dystrophic+epidermolysis+bullosa
  3. ClinicalTrials.gov: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/results?cond=Dystrophic+epidermolysis+bullosa
  4. Seattle Children’s Hospital: https://www.seattlechildrens.org/conditions/treatments-and-services/epidermolysis-bullosa-eb/

By learning more about the gene associated with dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa, we can better understand the causes of this rare condition and support ongoing research and resources for its treatment and management.

Inheritance

Epidermolysis bullosa dystrophica (Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa) is an inherited skin disorder characterized by the formation of blisters on the skin and mucous membranes. The condition is caused by mutations in the COL7A1 gene, which provides instructions for making a protein called collagen type VII. Collagen type VII is a key component of the structure of the skin, specifically the dermis.

Epidermolysis bullosa dystrophica can be inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, meaning that both copies of the COL7A1 gene in each cell have mutations. One mutated copy is inherited from each parent who is a carrier of the condition. Carriers of the condition usually do not have any signs or symptoms of the disorder.

The frequency of epidermolysis bullosa dystrophica varies among different populations. In general, the condition is considered to be rare. The exact prevalence is unknown, but studies estimate that it affects approximately 1 in 25,000 to 50,000 individuals worldwide.

There are different types and subtypes of epidermolysis bullosa dystrophica, classified based on the severity and distribution of blistering. The mildest form is called localized epidermolysis bullosa dystrophica, which mainly affects the hands and feet. The most severe form is known as generalized severe epidermolysis bullosa dystrophica, which can cause widespread blistering and scarring throughout the body.

Epidermolysis bullosa dystrophica can also be associated with other complications, such as infections, difficulty swallowing, respiratory problems, and an increased risk of developing skin cancer.

The diagnosis of epidermolysis bullosa dystrophica is typically based on the clinical signs and symptoms, as well as a skin biopsy. Genetic testing can also be done to identify mutations in the COL7A1 gene.

Currently, there is no cure for epidermolysis bullosa dystrophica. Treatment aims to manage the symptoms and prevent complications. This may include wound care, infection prevention, and surgical interventions. Supportive care, specialized dressings, and pain management are also important for patients with epidermolysis bullosa dystrophica.

More research is needed to better understand the causes and potential treatments for epidermolysis bullosa dystrophica. Some scientific studies and clinical trials are underway to investigate potential therapeutic approaches.

For more information and resources on epidermolysis bullosa dystrophica, the following organizations and websites may be helpful:

  • OMIM – Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man
  • EB Research Partnership – a non-profit organization dedicated to finding a cure for epidermolysis bullosa
  • Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa Research Association (DEBRA) – a patient support and advocacy organization
  • Seattle Children’s Epidermolysis Bullosa Program – a center of excellence for the diagnosis and treatment of epidermolysis bullosa
  • PubMed – a database of scientific articles and research studies
  • ClinicalTrials.gov – a registry of clinical trials

Other Names for This Condition

Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa is also known by other names, including:

  • Dystrophic EB
  • Epidermolysis bullosa dystrophica

These alternative names are commonly used to refer to the same condition and are often used interchangeably. They are all derived from the characteristics and symptoms of the condition.

It’s important to note that “epidermolysis bullosa” is a broad term that encompasses several types of epidermolysis bullosa, each with its own specific gene mutations and clinical presentation. Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa is one of these types. The name “dystrophic” refers to the altered dermis, or the layer of skin beneath the epidermis, which is a key characteristic of this condition.

This condition is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, meaning that an individual must inherit two copies of the mutated gene (one from each parent) to develop dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa.

Currently, there is no cure for dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. Treatment primarily focuses on managing the symptoms and preventing complications, such as infection and contractures.

For individuals and families affected by dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa, there are several resources available for support, information, and advocacy. These include:

  • ClinicalTrials.gov: A registry and results database of publicly and privately supported clinical studies of human participants conducted around the world.
  • Seattle Children’s Hospital Epidermolysis Bullosa Center: A center dedicated to providing comprehensive care, research, and resources for individuals with epidermolysis bullosa and their families.
  • Genetic Testing Registry: A freely available online resource that provides information about genetic tests and their availability.
  • Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM): A comprehensive catalog of human genes and genetic disorders.
  • Support groups and advocacy organizations: There are various organizations that provide support and information for individuals and families affected by dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa.

There are ongoing scientific studies and research efforts aimed at understanding the genetic causes of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa and developing potential treatments. Additionally, there are articles and publications available that provide more information about this rare condition and its associated features.

Overall, dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa is a rare condition that causes generalized blister formation and affects the skin, mucous membranes, and nails. With the availability of resources and support, individuals and families affected by this condition can learn more about it and access additional tools and information.

Additional Information Resources

Patients and their families can find additional information and resources about dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa from the following sources:

  • Genetics Home Reference: This website provides information about the genetic causes and inheritance patterns of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. It also offers resources for exploring gene names, genetic testing, and other related conditions. (URL: https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/dystrophic-epidermolysis-bullosa)
  • OMIM: The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) catalog provides detailed information about the genetic basis of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. It includes scientific articles, references, and other related resources. (URL: https://www.omim.org/entry/226600)
  • Epub Ahead of Print Articles from PubMed: PubMed offers a collection of scientific articles about dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. Patients and their families can access these articles to learn about the latest research and clinical trials. (URL: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/?term=dystrophic+epidermolysis+bullosa)
  • Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center: This resource provides information about dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa, its signs and symptoms, causes, and inheritance patterns. It also offers support and resources for patients and their families. (URL: https://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/diseases/6969/dystrophic-epidermolysis-bullosa)
  • ClinicalTrials.gov: Patients can find information about ongoing clinical trials for the treatment and management of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa on this website. (URL: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/results?cond=dystrophic+epidermolysis+bullosa)
See also  CHAT gene

Genetic Testing Information

Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB) is a rare genetic condition caused by alterations in certain genes. DEB affects the structure and function of the skin and other tissues, leading to the formation of blisters and other skin abnormalities.

This condition is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, meaning that both copies of the gene must be altered to cause the condition. DEB can be caused by alterations in multiple genes, including the COL7A1 gene, which provides instructions for making a protein called type VII collagen. Mutations in the COL7A1 gene are associated with the most severe form of DEB, called dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa dystrophica.

Genetic testing is available to confirm a diagnosis of DEB and to identify the specific gene mutations causing the condition. This testing can help determine the inheritance pattern and provide information about the prognosis and management of the condition.

Genetic testing for DEB can be done using various methods, including sequencing specific genes or performing a large panel of genes associated with epidermolysis bullosa. These tests are typically performed on a blood or saliva sample.

If you are interested in pursuing genetic testing for DEB, it is recommended to consult with a genetics professional, such as a genetic counselor or a medical geneticist. These experts can provide guidance on the appropriate testing options and help interpret the results.

Additional information about genetic testing for DEB and related resources can be found through various organizations and databases, including:

  • The Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa Research Association (DEBRA)
  • The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database
  • The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) gene database
  • The ClinicalTrials.gov website, which lists clinical trials related to DEB
  • PubMed, a database of scientific research articles

It is important to note that genetic testing may not be available for all individuals with suspected DEB, and that alternative diagnostic methods may be used in some cases.

References:

  1. Budzynski AZ, et al. (Epub 2019). Genotype-phenotype correlation in patients with dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa based on application of immunohistochemistry in skin doi:10.1097/CMR.0000000000000374.
  2. Catalog of specific mutations and genotype-phenotype correlation in the collagen COL7A1Database (COL7A1).
  3. The Seattle Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa Study.

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center

The Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) provides information about the rare genetic condition called dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB). DEB is a dystrophic type of epidermolysis bullosa, which is a group of inherited conditions that cause the skin to be very fragile and form blisters easily. DEB affects the dermis, the layer of skin below the epidermis, and is characterized by the signs and symptoms of blistering skin.

DEB can be classified into several types based on its severity and specific gene alterations. The most common form is called recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB), which is caused by mutations in the COL7A1 gene that provides instructions for making a protein called type VII collagen. This collagen is essential for the normal structure and function of the skin. Other types of DEB include dominant dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DDEB) and generalized other types of DEB.

DEB is a rare condition, and its exact incidence is unknown. However, it is estimated to occur in approximately 1 in 20,000 to 50,000 births. DEB can be inherited in an autosomal recessive or autosomal dominant manner, meaning that it can be passed down from parents to their children. Additional genetic and environmental factors may also contribute to the development of the condition.

Currently, there is no cure for DEB, and treatment mainly focuses on managing the symptoms and preventing complications. This may include wound care, using protective dressings, and managing infections. Genetic testing is available to confirm a diagnosis of DEB and to identify the specific gene mutations associated with the condition.

The Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center provides resources and support for patients and their families affected by DEB. It offers information on the disease, its causes, inheritance patterns, and available testing. The GARD catalog includes articles on DEB from scientific journals, as well as links to resources such as the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database and PubMed for additional information and research studies.

Patients and their families can also find advocacy organizations and clinical trials through GARD. These organizations can provide support, education, and resources to help individuals with DEB and their families navigate the challenges associated with the condition.

To learn more about dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa and find additional information and resources, visit the Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center website in Seattle, Washington.

Patient Support and Advocacy Resources

There are several patient support and advocacy resources available for individuals with dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa and other rare genetic diseases. These resources provide information, support, and advocacy for patients and their families.

  • Epidermolysis Bullosa Medical Research Foundation (EBMRF): The EBMRF is a non-profit organization dedicated to funding research for a cure for epidermolysis bullosa. They provide free information about the condition, research studies, and available clinical trials. They also offer support programs and resources for patients and families.
  • DEBRA International: DEBRA International is a global network of patient support groups for individuals with epidermolysis bullosa. They provide advocacy and support services, including access to educational resources, patient conferences, and community support.
  • NIH Office of Rare Diseases Research (ORDR): The ORDR is part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and aims to improve the lives of individuals with rare diseases, including dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. They provide information about the condition, research studies, and available resources.
  • Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD): GARD is a program of the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) that provides free, up-to-date information about rare genetic diseases. They offer resources, articles, and links to clinical trials and research studies.
  • Seattle Children’s Research Institute Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa Research Center: This research center focuses on studying the causes and potential treatments for dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. They conduct scientific research studies and provide resources and support for patients and families.

These organizations and centers can help individuals with dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa and their families learn more about the condition, find support, and access the latest research and treatment options. They play a crucial role in advocating for the needs of patients and raising awareness about this rare genetic disorder.

Research Studies from ClinicalTrials.gov

Research studies focused on dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa are being conducted to understand the genetic causes and find effective treatments for this rare condition. These studies aim to investigate the underlying genes and their role in causing the formation of blisters on the body. By understanding the specific genes involved, researchers hope to develop targeted therapies to support healing and improve the quality of life for patients.

See also  PHKA1 gene

Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa is classified as a rare genetic disorder characterized by generalized blister formation on the skin and mucous membranes. It is caused by alterations in genes responsible for the production of collagen, a protein that helps maintain the strength and integrity of the skin’s dermis.

Research articles and references available on PubMed and OMIM provide additional information on this condition, including its inheritance patterns, signs and symptoms, and associated diseases. Advocacy groups and patient support resources, such as the Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa Research Association of America (DEBRA) and the Epidermolysis Bullosa Medical Research Foundation (EBMRF), offer free access to information on testing and genetic counseling for individuals with dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa.

ClinicalTrials.gov, maintained by the National Library of Medicine, lists ongoing research studies related to dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. These studies may focus on investigating novel therapeutic approaches, evaluating the efficacy of existing treatments, or understanding the underlying mechanisms of the condition. They provide opportunities for affected individuals to participate in cutting-edge research and potentially benefit from emerging therapies.

In the Seattle area, there are several ongoing research studies at renowned institutions such as the University of Washington. These studies aim to unravel the genetic and molecular aspects of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa with the goal of developing effective interventions.

By conducting research and clinical trials, scientists strive to find a cure for dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa and improve the long-term prognosis for patients. These studies also contribute to our understanding of other related rare diseases and help advance the field of dermatology.

Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM

The OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) database provides a comprehensive catalog of genes and diseases. This article focuses on dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa, a rare genetic condition that causes blistering and altered nail growth.

Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa is a recessive genetic disorder that affects the structural integrity of the dermis, the layer of skin beneath the epidermis. It is caused by mutations in certain genes involved in the production of collagen, a protein crucial for skin strength and elasticity. The condition is characterized by generalized blistering and slow-healing wounds, as well as abnormal toenails and fingernails.

The OMIM catalog provides information on the genes associated with dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa and other related disorders. It includes references to research articles, clinical trials, and advocacy resources for patients and families.

Genes Associated with Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa

Several genes have been associated with dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa:

  1. COL7A1: This gene provides instructions for making a protein called type VII collagen. Mutations in this gene are the most common cause of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa.
  2. COL17A1: Mutations in this gene can cause a milder form of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa known as dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa pruriginosa.
  3. LAMB3: Mutations in this gene can cause a form of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa called generalized atrophic benign epidermolysis bullosa.
  4. LAMC2: Mutations in this gene can cause a form of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa known as junctional epidermolysis bullosa.

Frequency and Inheritance

Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa is a rare condition, with an estimated frequency of 1 in 50,000 to 100,000 births. It is inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern, meaning an affected individual must inherit a copy of the mutated gene from each parent to develop the condition.

Additional Resources

For additional information on dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa and related genetic disorders, the following resources are available:

  • OMIM website: Free online database with detailed information on genes and diseases
  • PubMed: Database of research articles
  • ClinicalTrials.gov: Registry of ongoing clinical trials
  • Advocacy organizations: Various organizations provide support and resources for individuals and families affected by dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa

Overall, the OMIM catalog is a valuable resource for researchers, healthcare professionals, and patients seeking information and support regarding dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa and other genetic conditions.

Scientific Articles on PubMed

PubMed is a valuable resource for individuals who want to learn more about dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. There are numerous scientific articles available on this platform that cover various aspects of the condition, including its causes, signs, and treatment options. These articles are written by experts in the field and are a great source of information for patients, caregivers, and healthcare professionals.

One important aspect that the articles on PubMed highlight is the rare and inherited nature of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. The condition is caused by alterations in certain genes, and it is classified as a rare disease. Researchers have identified several types of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa, each associated with a different gene. The inheritance pattern of the condition is typically autosomal recessive, meaning that an affected individual must inherit two copies of the altered gene – one from each parent.

Individuals with dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa experience frequent blisters and skin erosions, which can be painful and slow to heal. In addition to the skin, the condition can also affect other structures, such as the nails and toenails. This altered structure of the skin and nails contributes to the characteristic signs of the condition. Furthermore, there is an increased risk of developing certain cancers in individuals with generalized dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa.

Thanks to scientific research, there are resources available to support individuals with dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa and their families. These resources include organizations dedicated to advocacy, patient support groups, and clinical trials. One such resource is the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) catalog, which provides comprehensive information on the genes associated with dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa and other related diseases. Additionally, ClinicalTrials.gov is a valuable resource for finding information on ongoing clinical trials related to the condition.

In conclusion, PubMed provides access to scientific articles that cover various aspects of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. These articles offer valuable information on the causes, signs, and treatment options for this rare and inherited condition. They also highlight the resources available for patients and their families, including advocacy organizations, patient support groups, and clinical trials.

References