Edoxaban

If you have atrial fibrillation (a condition in which the heart beats irregularly, increasing the chance of clots forming in the body, and possibly causing strokes) and are taking edoxaban to help prevent strokes or serious blood clots, you are at a higher risk of having a stroke after you stop taking this medication. Do not stop taking edoxaban without talking to your doctor. Continue to take edoxaban even if you feel well. Be sure to refill your prescription before you run out of medication so that you will not miss any doses of edoxaban. If you need to stop taking edoxaban, your doctor may prescribe another anticoagulant (”blood thinner”) to help prevent a blood clot from forming and causing you to have a stroke.

If you have epidural or spinal anesthesia or a spinal puncture while taking a ‘blood thinner’ such as edoxaban, you are at risk of having a blood clot form in or around your spine that could cause you to become paralyzed. Tell your doctor if you have an epidural catheter that is left in your body or have or have ever had repeated epidural or spinal punctures, spinal deformity, or spinal surgery. Tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are taking anagrelide (Agrylin); aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others), indomethacin (Indocin, Tivorbex), ketoprofen, and naproxen (Aleve, Anaprox, others); cilostazol (Pletal); clopidogrel (Plavix); dipyridamole (Persantine); eptifibatide (Integrilin); heparin; prasugrel (Effient); ticagrelor (Brilinta); ticlopidine; tirofiban (Aggrastat), and warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven). If you experience any of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately: back pain, muscle weakness, numbness or tingling (especially in your legs), loss of control of your bowels or bladder, or inability to move your legs.

Keep all appointments with your doctor and the laboratory. Your doctor will order a test to check how well your kidneys are working before and periodically during your treatment with edoxaban.

Your doctor or pharmacist will give you the manufacturer’s patient information sheet (Medication Guide) when you begin treatment with edoxaban and each time you refill your prescription. Read the information carefully and ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions. You can also visit the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) website (http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Drugs/DrugSafety/) or the manufacturer’s website to obtain the Medication Guide.

Talk to your doctor about the risk of taking edoxaban.

🔔 Why is this medication prescribed?

Edoxaban is used help prevent strokes or blood clots in people who have atrial fibrillation (a condition in which the heart beats irregularly, increasing the chance of clots forming in the body and possibly causing strokes) that is not caused by heart valve disease. Edoxaban is also used to prevent deep vein thrombosis (DVT; a blood clot, usually in the leg) and pulmonary embolism (PE; a blood clot in the lung) in people who have been treated with an injectable blood thinner medicine for 5 to 10 days. Edoxaban is in a class of medications called factor Xa inhibitors. It works by blocking the action of a certain natural substance that helps blood clots to form.

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🔔 How should this medicine be used?

Edoxaban comes as a tablet to take by mouth. It is usually taken with or without food once a day. Take edoxaban at around the same times every day. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Take edoxaban exactly as directed. Do not take more or less of it or take it more often than prescribed by your doctor.

If you are unable to swallow the tablets, crush and mix them with 2 to 3 ounces (60 to 90 mL) of water or applesauce. Take the mixture immediately.

If you have a gastric tube, the tablets can be crushed and mixed in water and given through the tube. Ask your doctor or pharmacist how you should take the medication. Follow those directions carefully.

🔔 Other uses for this medicine

This medication may be prescribed for other uses; ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.