Eosinophil peroxidase deficiency is a rare genetic condition associated with problems in a gene that affects the health and function of eosinophils. Eosinophils are a type of white blood cell that are involved in the immune response and help to fight off certain infections and diseases.

Individuals with eosinophil peroxidase deficiency have a reduced or absent activity of the eosinophil peroxidase enzyme, which can lead to toxic changes in the cells and cause various health problems. This condition is diagnosed through genetic testing and is often associated with other genetic changes.

More information about eosinophil peroxidase deficiency can be found in scientific articles and resources available on the OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) catalog. The frequency of this condition is unknown, but it is considered rare. Patients and their families can learn about this rare genetic condition, its causes, inheritance patterns, associated diseases, and more through advocacy groups, patient support organizations, and genetic counseling centers.

Support and additional information can be found from organizations that focus on rare diseases and genetic conditions, such as the Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) and the National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD). These resources provide educational materials, support networks, and references to scientific articles and research on eosinophil peroxidase deficiency.

Genetic testing can provide additional information about the specific genetic changes associated with eosinophil peroxidase deficiency. It is important for patients and their families to work closely with healthcare providers and genetic counselors to understand the implications of a diagnosis and to receive appropriate care and support.

Frequency

Eosinophil peroxidase deficiency is a rare genetic condition associated with changes in the EPO gene. The frequency of this deficiency is not well-established, but it is considered to be a rare condition. There are currently no advocacy groups specifically focused on this deficiency.

The per capita price of healthcare per year is higher in the United States than in any other nation in the world, according to National Public Radio (NPR). America spends nearly 2.5 times as much per person as the United Kingdom does, despite having comparable wealth and a lower life expectancy.

As of now, there are only a few documented cases of eosinophil peroxidase deficiency. Due to its rarity, not much is known about the exact frequency or inheritance patterns of this condition. Most of the information available comes from scientific articles, OMIM, PubMed, and other genetic resources.

Patients with eosinophil peroxidase deficiency may experience a range of health problems. The deficiency in eosinophil peroxidase can cause toxic changes in the eosinophils, leading to various clinical manifestations. Symptoms and severity may vary from patient to patient.

Diagnosing eosinophil peroxidase deficiency typically involves genetic testing to identify mutations in the EPO gene. Additional testing may be required to rule out other genetic causes and associated diseases.

For more information and support, patients and their families can consult with medical professionals and genetic counselors. They can also seek additional resources through genetic disease support centers.

References:

  • OMIM: Eosinophil Peroxidase Deficiency – https://omim.org/entry/261450
  • PubMed: Eosinophil Peroxidase Deficiency – https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/?term=eosinophil+peroxidase+deficiency

Causes

Eosinophil peroxidase deficiency is a rare genetic condition. According to a study published on PubMed, the frequency of this condition is very low, making it a rare disease. There are currently no other associated diseases or health changes known to be linked to this deficiency.

Deficiency of eosinophil peroxidase is caused by mutations in the EPX gene. This gene provides instructions for making the eosinophil peroxidase enzyme, which is important for the function of eosinophils. Eosinophils are a type of white blood cell that play a role in the immune response.

Genetic testing can be done to diagnose this condition. Patients with eosinophil peroxidase deficiency may have recurrent infections or respiratory problems. Additional testing may include measuring eosinophil levels or measuring eosinophil peroxidase activity in the blood.

More scientific information about this condition can be found on OMIM, a catalog of human genes and genetic disorders. The Eosinophil Peroxidase Deficiency entry on OMIM provides detailed information about the genes associated with this deficiency, the inheritance pattern, and other clinical features.

For patient support and advocacy, there are resources available that offer more information about eosinophil peroxidase deficiency. Various articles and references can be found providing additional information about this rare condition.

Learn more about the gene associated with Eosinophil peroxidase deficiency

If a patient is diagnosed with Eosinophil peroxidase deficiency, additional testing may be necessary to learn more about the condition and its associated genes. This rare genetic condition affects the EPO gene, which provides instructions for making the Eosinophil peroxidase enzyme.

Eosinophil peroxidase deficiency is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, meaning that both copies of the EPO gene must have changes in order for the individual to develop the condition. These gene changes can cause a decrease in the activity of the Eosinophil peroxidase enzyme, leading to toxic problems in the eosinophils, a type of white blood cell.

See also  MATR3 gene

To learn more about the genetics and inheritance of Eosinophil peroxidase deficiency, you can visit the OMIM database. OMIM provides comprehensive information on genetic conditions, including inheritance patterns, associated genes, and other related information.

In addition, there are several advocacy and support resources available for individuals and families affected by Eosinophil peroxidase deficiency. These resources provide information on the condition, connect individuals with others facing similar challenges, and offer support and guidance.

Scientific articles and research studies can also provide more information on Eosinophil peroxidase deficiency. PubMed is a database that contains a wealth of scientific articles on various genetic diseases, including Eosinophil peroxidase deficiency. These articles can provide more details on the frequency of the condition, its associated health problems, and potential treatment options.

Overall, learning more about the gene associated with Eosinophil peroxidase deficiency can help individuals and families better understand the condition and its implications. By accessing resources and scientific articles, patients can gain a deeper understanding of the genetic changes that cause the deficiency and the potential impact on their health.

Inheritance

Eosinophil peroxidase deficiency is a rare genetic condition with an autosomal recessive inheritance. This means that an individual must inherit two copies of the mutated gene, one from each parent, to be diagnosed with the condition.

The gene responsible for eosinophil peroxidase deficiency is called the EPX gene. Mutations in this gene can lead to a decrease or absence of eosinophil peroxidase, an enzyme that is crucial for the normal function of eosinophils – a type of white blood cell.

Scientific research has identified several different mutations in the EPX gene that can cause eosinophil peroxidase deficiency. These mutations can result in changes to the structure or function of the enzyme, leading to problems with the toxic capabilities of eosinophils.

The frequency of eosinophil peroxidase deficiency is not well-defined, as it is a rare condition. However, articles and studies on the topic are available on resources like PubMed, OMIM, and other genetic databases, providing additional information about the inheritance and causes of this condition.

Individuals with eosinophil peroxidase deficiency can experience a range of health issues, including recurrent infections, allergies, and other immune-related disorders. The severity and specific symptoms can vary from patient to patient.

Genetic testing can be used to confirm a diagnosis of eosinophil peroxidase deficiency. This testing typically involves sequencing the EPX gene to identify any mutations or changes in the DNA sequence.

Support and advocacy organizations may exist to help individuals and families learn more about eosinophil peroxidase deficiency and connect with other individuals affected by this condition. These organizations can provide resources and support for genetic testing, treatment options, and information on associated diseases.

Other Names for This Condition

  • Eosinophil peroxidase deficiency
  • Lack of eosinophil peroxidase
  • EPD
  • Inherited eosinophil peroxidase deficiency
  • Eosinophil peroxidase deficiency (EPD)
  • Eosinophil peroxidase deficiency syndrome
  • Inherited deficiency of eosinophil peroxidase

Eosinophil peroxidase deficiency, also known as EPD, is a rare genetic condition characterized by the absence or insufficient levels of the enzyme eosinophil peroxidase. This enzyme plays a key role in the immune system, specifically in the function of eosinophils, a type of white blood cell involved in allergic reactions and defense against parasites.

Changes (mutations) in the EPX gene are responsible for causing this condition. The EPX gene provides instructions for the production of eosinophil peroxidase, and mutations in this gene result in decreased or absent enzyme activity. The inheritance pattern of eosinophil peroxidase deficiency is autosomal recessive, meaning that two copies of the mutated gene are necessary for the condition to be present.

Eosinophil peroxidase deficiency is often diagnosed based on a clinical evaluation and specialized laboratory testing. Patients with this condition may experience an increased susceptibility to certain infections, allergies, and respiratory problems. However, the absence of eosinophil peroxidase typically does not cause significant health problems on its own.

Currently, there is no specific treatment for eosinophil peroxidase deficiency. However, prompt and appropriate management of associated health issues, such as infections and allergies, is important. Genetic counseling may be beneficial for affected individuals and their families to learn more about the condition, its inheritance pattern, and the associated risks.

For those seeking more information about eosinophil peroxidase deficiency, several resources are available. The OMIM database, which stands for Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man, provides detailed genetic and scientific information about diseases and genes. PubMed is a valuable source of peer-reviewed scientific articles. Advocacy and support organizations can also provide additional information and resources for patients and their families.

In conclusion, eosinophil peroxidase deficiency, also known as EPD, is a rare genetic condition characterized by the absence or insufficient levels of the enzyme eosinophil peroxidase. It is caused by changes (mutations) in the EPX gene. Although rare, this condition can be associated with certain health problems, and prompt management of associated issues is important. Various resources are available for learning more about this condition, including scientific databases and advocacy organizations.

Additional Information Resources

If you are diagnosed with Eosinophil peroxidase deficiency, it is important to learn more about this genetic condition. Here are some resources that you can use to gather more information:

  • Genetic Testing: You can undergo genetic testing to identify changes in the Eosinophil peroxidase gene. This can help confirm the diagnosis and provide information about the inheritance pattern.
  • OMIM: The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) catalog provides detailed scientific information about genetic diseases, including Eosinophil peroxidase deficiency. You can find articles, references, and more on this condition.
  • PubMed: PubMed is a database of scientific articles where you can find studies and research papers related to Eosinophil peroxidase deficiency and other associated genes.
  • Center for Eosinophilic Disorders: This center specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of conditions related to eosinophils. They can provide information and support for patients with Eosinophil peroxidase deficiency.
  • Patient Advocacy Groups: There are patient advocacy groups that focus on genetic disorders and provide support and resources for individuals and families affected by rare conditions. They can provide information about Eosinophil peroxidase deficiency and connect you with others who have the same condition.
See also  3-beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase deficiency

These additional resources can help you better understand the causes, symptoms, and management of Eosinophil peroxidase deficiency. It is important to stay updated with the latest information and research in order to manage your health effectively.

Genetic Testing Information

Genetic testing is available for individuals who may have eosinophil peroxidase deficiency. This test can confirm the presence of the condition and provide valuable information about the specific gene changes that cause it.

There are several names associated with this condition, including eosinophil peroxidase deficiency and eosinophil peroxidase gene deficiency. It is a rare genetic disorder with a low frequency of occurrence in the general population. However, it is more common in certain patient populations, such as those with health problems associated with eosinophils.

Genetic testing for eosinophil peroxidase deficiency can be done through a variety of scientific methods. This testing aims to identify changes in the eosinophil peroxidase gene that are associated with the condition.

Diagnosed individuals and their families can benefit from genetic testing by gaining a better understanding of the inheritance pattern and the potential risks for future generations. Additionally, genetic testing can provide important information for healthcare providers to guide treatment decisions and management strategies.

For more information about genetic testing, there are several resources available, including the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database and PubMed. These resources provide scientific articles and additional information about genetic diseases and gene testing.

The Genetic Testing and Counseling Center, as well as various advocacy groups and support organizations, provide valuable resources and support for individuals affected by eosinophil peroxidase deficiency. These organizations can offer guidance, advice, and access to genetic counseling services.

References:

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center

The Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) is a resource provided by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). GARD provides free access to reliable, up-to-date information on genetic and rare diseases.

When it comes to eosinophil peroxidase deficiency, GARD can provide valuable information for patients, families, healthcare professionals, and researchers. This condition is a rare genetic disorder that affects the eosinophils, which are a type of white blood cell involved in the immune response.

Eosinophil peroxidase deficiency is diagnosed through specialized testing, such as genetic testing. GARD can provide information on the frequency, inheritance patterns, and causes of this condition, as well as associated health problems and genetic changes involved.

On GARD’s website, patients and their families can learn more about eosinophil peroxidase deficiency, including its symptoms, prognosis, and available treatments. The website also provides links to scientific articles, patient advocacy organizations, and other resources for additional support and information.

In addition to information on specific diseases, GARD offers resources on genetics and genetic testing. Patients and healthcare professionals can access resources on genetic counseling, inheritance patterns, and the role of genes in rare diseases.

GARD also provides a catalog of rare diseases, including eosinophil peroxidase deficiency, where users can find more information on other rare conditions. The catalog includes information on the signs and symptoms, prevalence, and associated genes.

For scientific references and more in-depth information on eosinophil peroxidase deficiency, researchers and healthcare professionals can refer to the PubMed database. PubMed is a publicly available database of scientific articles on various medical and genetic topics.

Overall, GARD is a valuable resource for anyone seeking information on genetic and rare diseases. Whether it’s learning about the causes and inheritance of eosinophil peroxidase deficiency or finding support from patient advocacy organizations, GARD provides comprehensive and reliable information to support individuals and families affected by rare diseases.

Patient Support and Advocacy Resources

Patients diagnosed with Eosinophil Peroxidase Deficiency may find support and information from the following resources:

  • Eosinophils: Learn more about eosinophils and the changes in their genetic makeup that can lead to Eosinophil Peroxidase Deficiency. Visit their website to find scientific articles and additional information on this rare condition.
  • Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center: This center provides information on the causes, frequency, inheritance, and other names for genetic diseases. It offers resources for patients diagnosed with rare genetic conditions like Eosinophil Peroxidase Deficiency.
  • OMIM: The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) is a comprehensive catalog of human genes and genetic disorders. Patients can find information about Eosinophil Peroxidase Deficiency in this database.
  • PubMed: Use PubMed to search for scientific articles and research studies related to Eosinophil Peroxidase Deficiency. This can help patients stay updated on the latest developments and findings in the field.
  • Patient Advocacy: Join patient advocacy groups and organizations focused on supporting individuals with rare genetic conditions. These groups provide community and resources for patients, helping them navigate the challenges of living with Eosinophil Peroxidase Deficiency.
  • Genetic Testing: Explore options for genetic testing to confirm the diagnosis of Eosinophil Peroxidase Deficiency. Genetic testing can help identify changes in specific genes associated with the condition.
  • Additional Resources: Reach out to your healthcare provider for additional resources and support. They may be able to recommend specific organizations or specialists who can provide further assistance.
See also  Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency

Remember, it is important to consult with a healthcare professional for personalized advice and guidance specific to your condition.

Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM

The Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM is a comprehensive resource that provides information about genetic conditions and the associated genes. This catalog includes a wide range of rare genetic diseases, including Eosinophil Peroxidase Deficiency.

Eosinophil Peroxidase Deficiency is a rare condition characterized by a lack or low levels of eosinophil peroxidase, an enzyme found in eosinophils, which are a type of white blood cell. This deficiency can cause health problems in individuals, as eosinophils play a role in the body’s immune response.

The frequency of this condition is not well documented, but it is considered rare. The condition is associated with changes in the EPX gene, which provides instructions for producing eosinophil peroxidase. Inheritance of this condition is thought to be autosomal recessive, meaning that both copies of the EPX gene must be altered to have the deficiency.

Patients diagnosed with Eosinophil Peroxidase Deficiency may experience symptoms such as recurrent infections, allergies, and other immune-related problems. Testing for this condition can be done through genetic testing, which looks for changes in the EPX gene.

This catalog offers additional information and resources about Eosinophil Peroxidase Deficiency, including scientific articles and references from PubMed and OMIM. It also provides support and advocacy resources for patients and their families.

For more information about this rare genetic condition, its causes, and associated genes, individuals can visit the OMIM center and learn about the latest advancements in the field. The catalog serves as a valuable tool for researchers, healthcare professionals, and individuals seeking information about rare genetic diseases.

Resources
  • OMIM center
  • Scientific articles and references from PubMed
  • Support and advocacy resources

Scientific Articles on PubMed

Are you looking for scientific articles on Eosinophil Peroxidase Deficiency? Here are some resources where you can learn more about this rare genetic condition:

1. OMIM – Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man

OMIM is a comprehensive catalog of human genes and genetic disorders. Eosinophil peroxidase deficiency is listed here, along with information about the associated gene, inheritance patterns, and additional references.

2. PubMed

PubMed is a database of scientific articles in the field of medicine. Searching for “eosinophil peroxidase deficiency” on PubMed will provide you with a list of articles that have been published on this topic. You can find more information about the causes, diagnosis, and treatment of this condition through these articles.

3. Eosinophil Peroxidase Deficiency Support Center

The Eosinophil Peroxidase Deficiency Support Center is an advocacy group that provides support and resources for patients diagnosed with this rare genetic condition. They offer information, support groups, and educational materials to help patients and their families learn more about the condition and manage their health.

These resources can provide you with more information on the genetic changes associated with Eosinophil Peroxidase Deficiency, the frequency of the condition, and any associated health problems. Testing for this deficiency can be toxic, and it is important to consult with healthcare professionals for proper diagnosis and management of the condition.

References

  • Eosinophil peroxidase deficiency:
    • A condition associated with rare genetic changes in the gene for eosinophil peroxidase.
    • This deficiency causes problems with the function of eosinophils, a type of white blood cell.
  • OMIM:
    • Information on eosinophil peroxidase deficiency can be found in the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database.
    • The OMIM database provides genetic and scientific information about rare diseases and associated genes.
  • PubMed:
    • PubMed is a database that provides access to scientific articles and information on various health topics.
    • It can be used to learn more about eosinophil peroxidase deficiency and related research.
  • Genetic Testing:
    • Genetic testing can be done to diagnose eosinophil peroxidase deficiency.
    • This type of testing looks for changes in the gene associated with the condition.
  • Support and Advocacy:
    • There are resources available for patients and families affected by eosinophil peroxidase deficiency.
    • Support groups and advocacy centers can provide additional information and assistance.
  • Catalog of Genetic Diseases:
    • The Catalog of Genetic Diseases is a database that provides information on various genetic conditions.
    • It may have information on eosinophil peroxidase deficiency and its frequency.