Epidermolytic hyperkeratosis is a genetic condition characterized by palmoplantar hyperkeratosis, a thickening of the skin on the palms of the hands and soles of the feet. This rare condition is associated with mutations in the KRT10 and KRT1 genes. The exact cause of this condition is still unknown, but studies have shown that mutations in these genes can lead to the development of epidermolytic hyperkeratosis.

Epidermolytic hyperkeratosis is a rare condition, with only a few documented cases reported in the scientific literature. The frequency of this condition is still unclear, but studies have suggested that it may be more common than previously thought.

Patients with epidermolytic hyperkeratosis often present with hyperkeratotic erythroderma, a condition characterized by thickened, red, and scaly skin. The severity of the symptoms can vary from patient to patient, with some individuals experiencing mild symptoms and others experiencing more severe symptoms.

There are several resources available for patients and their families to learn more about epidermolytic hyperkeratosis and to find support and information. The OMIM database and the Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center provide additional information about this condition and associated genes. Patients can also find support networks and advocacy groups for epidermolytic hyperkeratosis to connect with others who have the condition and to stay up-to-date on the latest research and clinical trials on websites like PubMed and clinicaltrialsgov.

Frequency

Epidermolytic hyperkeratosis is a rare genetic condition that affects the skin. It is also known by other names such as bullous congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma and keratinopathic ichthyosis. The frequency of this condition is rare, with an estimated prevalence of 1 in 200,000 to 300,000 individuals worldwide.

Epidermolytic hyperkeratosis is caused by mutations in the KRT10 or KRT1 genes, which are responsible for producing the keratin proteins in the skin. These mutations lead to the dysfunction of keratinocytes, the cells that make up the epidermis. As a result, there is an excessive buildup of keratin within the epidermis, leading to hyperkeratosis.

Just under half – 49% – of Americans get their health insurance through their employer, according to the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Another 19% of Americans are insured under Medicaid, 14% under Medicare, seven% under non-group plans and two% under other public insurers, while nine% of U.S. citizens remain uninsured.

Research studies have been conducted to learn more about the genetic networks and mechanisms underlying epidermolytic hyperkeratosis. These studies have led to the identification of more genes associated with this condition, providing further insights into its causes and inheritance patterns.

Patient resources and advocacy groups, such as the Epidermolytic Hyperkeratosis Research Center, provide support and information for individuals and families affected by this rare condition. Additional information can be found in scientific articles and references from PubMed, OMIM, and ClinicalTrials.gov, which contains information about ongoing research and clinical trials.

Although epidermolytic hyperkeratosis is a rare condition, it is important for healthcare professionals to recognize its clinical features, as prompt diagnosis and treatment can lead to better outcomes for patients. The condition primarily affects the palms and soles of the feet, causing hyperkeratotic thickening of the skin in these areas.

In conclusion, epidermolytic hyperkeratosis is a rare genetic condition characterized by hyperkeratosis of the skin. Genetic research and patient advocacy groups provide resources and support for individuals affected by this condition. Further studies are ongoing to learn more about the genes and mechanisms involved in epidermolytic hyperkeratosis.

Causes

Epidermolytic hyperkeratosis is a rare genetic condition characterized by thickened skin and the formation of blisters. It is caused by mutations in the KRT10 or KRT1 genes, which encode proteins that are important for the structure and function of the skin. These mutations lead to the production of abnormal keratinocytes, the cells that make up the outermost layer of the skin.

The exact inheritance pattern of epidermolytic hyperkeratosis can vary. In some cases, the condition is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, which means that one copy of the mutated gene is sufficient to cause the condition. In other cases, it is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, which means that both copies of the gene must be mutated to develop the condition.

Epidermolytic hyperkeratosis is usually present at birth or develops in early infancy. The severity of the condition can vary widely, even among affected individuals within the same family. Some individuals may have only mild symptoms, while others may have more severe symptoms that affect their quality of life.

In addition to the KRT10 and KRT1 genes, other genes may also be associated with epidermolytic hyperkeratosis. Ongoing research and genetic testing are helping to identify these additional genes and learn more about the causes of the condition.

Epidermolytic hyperkeratosis is also associated with other genetic diseases, such as palmoplantar keratoderma and erythroderma. These conditions can have similar symptoms, and genetic testing can help determine the specific genetic cause.

For more information about the causes of epidermolytic hyperkeratosis, you may refer to resources such as OMIM, ClinicalTrials.gov, PubMed, and patient advocacy organizations. These sources provide information about ongoing research studies, clinical trials, and other resources available for learning about this rare genetic condition.

Learn more about the genes associated with Epidermolytic hyperkeratosis

Epidermolytic hyperkeratosis is a rare genetic condition that manifests as thickened and scaly skin. It is also known as bullous congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma or epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma. The condition affects the skin on the palms of the hands and soles of the feet, leading to hyperkeratosis.

Epidermolytic hyperkeratosis is caused by mutations in specific genes, particularly the keratin genes. The most commonly affected gene is KRT10, which encodes a protein called keratin 10. Mutations in KRT1, which encodes keratin 1, can also lead to the condition.

See also  ALDOB gene

For more information on the genes associated with Epidermolytic hyperkeratosis, you can refer to various resources and databases. The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database provides extensive information on genetic diseases, including Epidermolytic hyperkeratosis. PubMed, a scientific research database, offers articles and studies related to the condition and its genetic causes.

Additionally, the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) has a rare diseases database called the Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD), which provides patient resources and information on clinical trials.

ClinicalTrials.gov is another valuable resource where you can find ongoing or completed clinical trials related to Epidermolytic hyperkeratosis. These trials can provide additional information on the genes associated with the condition, as well as potential treatment options.

In conclusion, Epidermolytic hyperkeratosis is a genetic condition that affects the skin. It is caused by mutations in genes such as KRT10 and KRT1. Understanding the genetic basis of the condition can lead to better diagnosis, treatment, and support for patients and their families.

Inheritance

Epidermolytic hyperkeratosis (EHK) is a rare genetic condition that is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. This means that an affected individual has a 50% chance of passing the condition on to their children.

EHK is caused by mutations in the KRT10 or KRT1 genes, which are responsible for encoding a protein called keratin, a major component of the epidermis. These mutations result in the abnormal production of keratinocytes, leading to the hyperkeratotic and erythroderma observed in patients with EHK.

Additional scientific information about EHK and other genetic epidermal diseases can be found on resources such as OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man), PubMed, and the Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD). These databases provide valuable references, articles, and research studies on the condition, as well as information on clinical trials and patient advocacy groups.

ClinicalTrials.gov is another useful resource for accessing information on ongoing clinical trials related to EHK. These studies can provide valuable insights into the latest research and treatment options available for patients with EHK.

In conclusion, EHK is a rare genetic condition associated with the hyperkeratosis of the skin, particularly on the palms and soles. It is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner and is caused by mutations in the KRT10 or KRT1 genes. Interested individuals can find more information and support through various scientific resources, clinical trial networks, and patient advocacy organizations.

Other Names for This Condition

Epidermolytic hyperkeratosis, also known as bullous congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma (BCIE), is a rare genetic condition characterized by thickening of the skin and formation of blisters. It is caused by mutations in the KRT10 or KRT1 genes, which are responsible for producing proteins in keratinocytes, the cells that make up the outer layer of the skin.

Epidermolytic hyperkeratosis is also referred to as epidermal hyperkeratosis, bullous ichthyosiform erythroderma, or palmoplantar hyperkeratotic epidermolytic ichthyosis. These different names reflect the various manifestations of the condition, such as involvement of the palms and soles or the whole body.

Epidermolytic hyperkeratosis is a rare condition, with an estimated frequency of 1 in 200,000 to 300,000 births. Due to its rarity, there is limited scientific research and information available about this condition. However, advocacy groups and research centers are working to learn more about its causes, inheritance patterns, and potential treatments.

Additional information about epidermolytic hyperkeratosis and related genetic diseases can be found in scientific articles, research papers, and online resources such as OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) and PubMed. These resources can provide further insight into the genetic basis of this condition and offer support to patients and their families.

Genetic testing is available for diagnosing epidermolytic hyperkeratosis, and clinical trials for potential treatments may be listed on ClinicalTrials.gov. Interested individuals can consult with their healthcare provider or genetic counselor for more information about testing and available treatment options.

In conclusion, epidermolytic hyperkeratosis, or bullous congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma, is a rare genetic condition that leads to the formation of blisters and thickened skin. It is caused by mutations in the KRT10 or KRT1 genes and can be associated with palmoplantar involvement or affect the entire body. While there is limited information available about this condition, ongoing research and advocacy efforts aim to improve our understanding and develop potential treatments.

Additional Information Resources

Epidermolytic hyperkeratosis, also called bullous congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma or epidermolytic ichthyosis, is a rare genetic condition that causes hyperkeratosis and erythroderma. It is associated with mutations in the genes KRT10 and KRT1, which lead to abnormal keratin production in the epidermal layer of the skin.

For more information about epidermolytic hyperkeratosis, clinical trials, and genetic testing, the following resources may be helpful:

  • OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man): a comprehensive catalog of human genes and genetic disorders. You can learn more about the genetic causes and inheritance patterns of epidermolytic hyperkeratosis on the OMIM website.
  • PubMed: a database of scientific articles and research studies. Searching for “epidermolytic hyperkeratosis” on PubMed can provide you with more information about the clinical features, genetic mutations, and treatment options for this condition.
  • ClinicalTrials.gov: a registry of clinical trials. Searching for “epidermolytic hyperkeratosis” on ClinicalTrials.gov can help you find ongoing or upcoming studies that may be of interest to patients and families affected by this condition.

In addition to these resources, there are also advocacy and support networks for patients and families with epidermolytic hyperkeratosis. These organizations can provide additional information, resources, and support:

  • The Epidermolytic Hyperkeratosis Research and Advocacy Center: a nonprofit organization dedicated to raising awareness and supporting research for epidermolytic hyperkeratosis
  • The National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD): a patient advocacy organization that provides information, resources, and support for individuals with rare diseases

By accessing these additional resources, you can learn more about epidermolytic hyperkeratosis, find support, and stay up to date on the latest research and treatment options for this rare genetic condition.

Genetic Testing Information

Genetic testing plays a crucial role in the diagnosis and management of epidermolytic hyperkeratosis. This rare genetic disease, also known as bullous ichthyosiform erythroderma, is caused by mutations in certain genes involved in the production of a protein called keratinocytes.

See also  EIF2B3 gene

There are several resources available to obtain genetic testing for epidermolytic hyperkeratosis. One such resource is OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man), a catalog of human genes and genetic disorders. OMIM provides detailed information about the genes associated with this condition, as well as links to relevant scientific articles and research studies.

Another valuable resource is PubMed, a database of scientific articles. Searching for keywords such as “epidermolytic hyperkeratosis” or specific gene names can provide additional information about the condition and ongoing research studies. It is important to stay updated on the latest advancements in genetic research to better understand the inheritance patterns, frequency, and other clinical aspects of this condition.

ClinicalTrials.gov is another platform that provides information about ongoing clinical trials related to epidermolytic hyperkeratosis. Participating in these trials can provide valuable insights into new treatment options and potential therapeutic approaches.

Genetic testing can be obtained through specialized genetic testing centers or laboratories. These centers can provide comprehensive testing for the genes associated with epidermolytic hyperkeratosis. The results of genetic testing can help confirm the diagnosis, guide treatment decisions, and provide information about the inheritance pattern of the condition.

In addition to genetic testing, there are also advocacy and support networks available for individuals and families affected by epidermolytic hyperkeratosis. These resources can provide emotional support, additional information about the condition, and connect individuals with other affected individuals and families.

Overall, genetic testing is an important tool in the diagnosis and management of epidermolytic hyperkeratosis. By identifying the specific genes involved in this condition, it can lead to a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms and potential therapeutic targets. It is essential for individuals and healthcare providers to stay informed about the latest research and advancements in genetic testing for epidermolytic hyperkeratosis.

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center

The Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) is a resource provided by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) that offers information about genetic and rare diseases. GARD provides valuable resources and support for patients, families, and healthcare professionals seeking information about various genetic conditions.

Epidermolytic hyperkeratosis is a rare genetic condition that affects the skin. It is also known as palmoplantar keratoderma or epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma. The condition is caused by mutations in the KRT10 or KRT1 genes, which are responsible for the production of keratinocytes, a type of skin cell.

Epidermolytic hyperkeratosis is associated with hyperkeratotic skin lesions on the palms and soles. The thickened skin on the palms and soles can cause discomfort and pain, making it difficult for patients to walk or use their hands. In some cases, the condition may also lead to the development of blisters and erythroderma, a widespread redness and peeling of the skin.

If you or a loved one has been diagnosed with epidermolytic hyperkeratosis, GARD can provide valuable information about the condition. GARD offers resources such as articles, scientific studies, and additional references from PubMed, a trusted database of scientific publications.

In addition, GARD provides information about genetic testing and inheritance patterns associated with epidermolytic hyperkeratosis. Genetic testing can help confirm a diagnosis and identify the specific mutation causing the condition. GARD can also provide information about clinical trials and research studies that may be available for individuals with this condition.

GARD is a valuable resource for patient advocacy and support. Through GARD, individuals with rare genetic conditions like epidermolytic hyperkeratosis can find information about support networks, advocacy groups, and other resources available to them.

To learn more about epidermolytic hyperkeratosis and other rare genetic diseases, visit the Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) at the following website:

Patient Support and Advocacy Resources

Epidermolytic hyperkeratosis (EH), also known as epidermolytic hyperkeratosis or bullous congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma, is a rare genetic condition characterized by hyperkeratosis of the skin. It is caused by mutations in the KRT10 or KRT1 genes, which affect the production of keratinocytes in the epidermal layer of the skin.

For patients with epidermolytic hyperkeratosis and their families, it can be helpful to connect with patient support and advocacy resources. These resources provide information, support, and a sense of community for individuals affected by this rare condition.

Support Organizations and Networks

  • Epidermolytic Hyperkeratosis Research Center: This center focuses on research and studies related to epidermolytic hyperkeratosis and other hyperkeratotic conditions. They provide information about the causes, frequency, and inheritance of EH, as well as resources for genetic testing and clinical trials. More information can be found on their website: www.epidermolytichyperkeratosisresearchcenter.org.
  • Foundation for Ichthyosis & Related Skin Types (FIRST): FIRST is a patient advocacy organization that supports individuals and families affected by rare genetic skin disorders, including epidermolytic hyperkeratosis. They offer educational resources, networking opportunities, and support programs. Learn more about their services on their website: www.firstskinfoundation.org.

Scientific Articles and Research Studies

For those interested in learning more about epidermolytic hyperkeratosis, there are several scientific articles and research studies available. These resources provide in-depth information about the condition, its underlying genetic causes, and potential treatment strategies. Some recommended sources include:

  • OMIM Catalog of Genetic Diseases: OMIM is a comprehensive catalog of genetic diseases, including epidermolytic hyperkeratosis. It provides detailed information about the associated genes, inheritance patterns, and clinical features of the condition. Access the catalog on the OMIM website: www.omim.org.
  • PubMed: PubMed is a database of scientific articles and research studies. By searching for “epidermolytic hyperkeratosis,” individuals can find a wealth of information about the condition, including the latest research findings. Access PubMed at: www.pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov.

Additional Information and References

For more information about epidermolytic hyperkeratosis, individuals can refer to the following resources:

  • ClinicalTrials.gov: ClinicalTrials.gov provides information about ongoing clinical trials and research studies related to epidermolytic hyperkeratosis. It is a valuable resource for individuals who are interested in participating in research or learning about new treatment options. Visit the website at: www.clinicaltrials.gov.
  • Krystal Yang’s Orchid: Krystal Yang’s Orchid is a personal blog written by an individual living with epidermolytic hyperkeratosis. The blog offers a firsthand perspective on the impact of the condition and provides support for others living with EH. Visit the blog at: krystalyang.blogspot.com.
See also  CCN6 gene

By accessing these patient support and advocacy resources, individuals affected by epidermolytic hyperkeratosis can find information, support, and a sense of community. These resources can also provide opportunities to get involved in research studies and clinical trials, potentially leading to advancements in understanding and treating this rare genetic condition.

Research Studies from ClinicalTrials.gov

Epidermolytic hyperkeratosis, also called genetic epidermal hyperkeratosis, is a rare genetic condition that causes hyperkeratotic skin. It is associated with mutations in the KRT10 and KRT1 genes, which are involved in the production of keratinocytes, the cells that make up the outer layer of the skin.

Research on epidermolytic hyperkeratosis is ongoing, and there are several studies listed on ClinicalTrials.gov that are investigating this condition. These studies aim to learn more about the genetic causes of epidermolytic hyperkeratosis, as well as to develop new treatments and testing methods for the condition.

Some of the studies listed on ClinicalTrials.gov include:

  • A study investigating the genetic inheritance patterns of epidermolytic hyperkeratosis
  • A clinical trial testing the efficacy of a new topical treatment for the condition
  • A study examining the frequency of epidermolytic hyperkeratosis in different populations
  • A research project identifying additional genes and genetic networks associated with epidermolytic hyperkeratosis

These studies aim to provide more information about epidermolytic hyperkeratosis, its genetic causes, and potential treatment options. They are important resources for patients, healthcare providers, and advocacy groups who are seeking to learn more about this rare condition.

For more information about epidermolytic hyperkeratosis and to find additional scientific articles and resources, you can visit the OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) catalog and PubMed, as well as explore the research studies listed on ClinicalTrials.gov.

Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM

OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) is a comprehensive database that provides information on rare genetic disorders and the associated genes. One such disorder is hyperkeratosis, specifically epidermolytic hyperkeratosis, a rare condition characterized by thickened, hyperkeratotic skin.

The OMIM catalog includes a wealth of resources for understanding hyperkeratosis and other related diseases. Here, you can find information on the genetic causes of hyperkeratosis, as well as additional genes associated with this condition. The catalog also provides references to research articles, clinical trials, and scientific studies related to hyperkeratosis and its genetic underpinnings.

For patient advocacy and support, OMIM provides links to genetic support networks and advocacy organizations dedicated to hyperkeratosis and other related diseases. These organizations can provide invaluable support and information to patients and their families.

In addition to providing information on hyperkeratosis, OMIM also catalogs other rare diseases and their associated genes. This comprehensive database allows researchers, healthcare professionals, and patients to easily access information on a wide range of genetic disorders.

To learn more about hyperkeratosis and the associated genes, OMIM recommends exploring the published articles listed in their catalog. These articles provide in-depth insights into the genetic mechanisms and inheritance patterns of hyperkeratosis and other related conditions.

OMIM also highlights the availability of genetic testing for hyperkeratosis. Genetic testing can help confirm a diagnosis, identify the specific gene mutations causing the condition, and provide valuable information for patient management and counseling.

The OMIM catalog references information from other reputable sources, such as PubMed and ClinicalTrials.gov, which further enhance the resources available to researchers and healthcare professionals. These sources provide up-to-date information on ongoing clinical trials, research studies, and new discoveries in the field of hyperkeratosis.

Overall, the OMIM catalog is a valuable resource for anyone interested in learning about hyperkeratosis and related genetic disorders. Its comprehensive coverage, well-referenced information, and user-friendly interface make it an indispensable tool for researchers, healthcare professionals, and patients alike.

Scientific Articles on PubMed

The center of research and knowledge on epidermolytic hyperkeratosis is PubMed. PubMed is a widely-used platform that provides access to a large number of scientific articles on various health conditions and diseases. For rare genetic disorders like epidermolytic hyperkeratosis, PubMed is an invaluable resource to learn more about the condition and its causes.

Epidermolytic hyperkeratosis, also called bullous congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma, is a rare genetic condition that affects the skin. It is associated with mutations in the krt10 or krt1 genes, which lead to abnormal keratinocyte function in the epidermal layer of the skin. This results in thickened, hyperkeratotic skin, particularly on the palms and soles of the feet.

To learn more about epidermolytic hyperkeratosis, PubMed provides access to scientific articles and studies on the topic. These articles explore various aspects of the condition, including its genetic inheritance, clinical presentation, and treatment options. Researchers use PubMed to share their findings and contribute to the collective knowledge on epidermolytic hyperkeratosis.

Scientific articles on PubMed can also provide additional information on other related conditions and diseases. They may discuss the frequency of epidermolytic hyperkeratosis, its associated symptoms, and its impact on the patient’s quality of life. Some articles may also reference advocacy and support networks for patients and families affected by epidermolytic hyperkeratosis.

When conducting research on epidermolytic hyperkeratosis, PubMed can serve as a starting point to gather relevant scientific articles and references. These articles can provide valuable insights into the disease and guide further research and treatment options.

In addition to PubMed, other resources like OMIM and clinicaltrialsgov can also provide useful information on epidermolytic hyperkeratosis. These platforms offer genetic testing information, patient registries, and information on ongoing clinical trials.

In conclusion, scientific articles on PubMed serve as a comprehensive source of information on epidermolytic hyperkeratosis. They offer insights into the genetic and cellular mechanisms of the condition, clinical presentations, and treatment options. Researchers, healthcare professionals, and patients can utilize these articles to expand their knowledge and contribute to advancements in understanding and managing epidermolytic hyperkeratosis.

References