Familial candidiasis is a rare condition associated with a genetic susceptibility to persistent candida infection. It is characterized by recurrent and persistent infections of the skin, nails, and mucous membranes caused by the fungus Candida. The frequency and severity of these infections can vary from patient to patient, with some individuals experiencing mild symptoms without a known genetic cause, while others may have more persistent and severe infections.

The genetic causes of familial candidiasis are still being studied, but several genes have been identified as potential factors. These include the CARD9 and IL17RC genes, which are involved in the immune response against Candida. Additional genes may also play a part in the inheritance and susceptibility to this condition.

There is limited scientific information about familial candidiasis, but advocacy groups and support organizations provide resources and support for patients and their families. The Candidiasis Center at the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences offers information and resources on genetic testing, symptoms, and treatment options. The OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) database and PubMed can also provide more information on scientific articles and case reports on familial candidiasis.

It is important for individuals with familial candidiasis to seek appropriate medical care and testing to confirm their diagnosis and better understand their condition. Treatment may include antifungal medications to control and manage infections. Genetic counseling may also be recommended to provide information on inheritance pattern and risk to family members.

Frequency

Familial candidiasis is a rare genetic condition that affects the immune system’s ability to fight off fungal infections, particularly those caused by the Candida species. It is estimated to affect about 2 people in every 100,000.

In most cases, the condition is inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern, which means that both copies of the gene responsible for the condition must be mutated in order for an individual to be affected. However, there have been some reports of familial candidiasis being inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern, where only one copy of the mutated gene is necessary for the development of the condition.

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Patients with familial candidiasis often experience persistent and recurrent fungal infections in different parts of the body, such as the skin, nails, and mucous membranes. Some common symptoms include persistent oral thrush, nail infections, and skin rashes.

Genetic testing can be done to confirm a diagnosis of familial candidiasis. Mutations in genes such as CARD9, IL17RC, and others have been associated with an increased susceptibility to candida infections.

There are resources available for patients and their families to learn more about familial candidiasis, genetic testing, and associated diseases. These resources include websites such as OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) and PubMed, which provide scientific articles and citations. Additionally, patient advocacy groups may offer support, information, and resources for individuals and families affected by this condition.

Causes

Familial candidiasis, a rare genetic condition, is caused by mutations in specific genes that affect the immune system’s ability to combat Candida infections. These mutations can be inherited from one or both parents, leading to an increased susceptibility to persistent and recurrent candidiasis.

Insights into the genetic basis of familial candidiasis have come from studies on patients with the condition, as well as from laboratory research. Several genes have been associated with an increased risk of developing familial candidiasis, including CARD9, IL17RC, and many others. These genes play important roles in the immune response against Candida, and mutations in them can disrupt the body’s ability to effectively clear the infection.

The exact inheritance pattern of familial candidiasis can vary, with some cases showing autosomal dominant inheritance and others showing autosomal recessive inheritance. Autosomal dominant inheritance means that a person only needs to inherit one copy of the mutated gene from either parent to develop the condition, while autosomal recessive inheritance requires inheriting two copies of the mutated gene, one from each parent.

The frequency of familial candidiasis is rare, and it is estimated to affect only a small number of individuals worldwide. However, it is important to note that there may be other genes associated with familial candidiasis that have not yet been identified.

To learn more about the causes of familial candidiasis, genetic testing and consultation with a healthcare professional is commonly recommended. Genetic testing can help identify specific mutations in genes associated with the condition and provide valuable information for patients and their families.

For additional information about the genetics of familial candidiasis, resources such as the OMIM catalog and PubMed articles can be valuable sources of scientific information. These resources provide access to a wide range of articles on the topic, including research studies, case reports, and more.

In summary, the causes of familial candidiasis are primarily genetic, with mutations in specific genes associated with an increased susceptibility to recurrent Candida infections. Understanding the genetic basis of familial candidiasis can provide important insights into the condition and help guide diagnostic testing and treatment decisions.

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Learn more about the genes associated with Familial candidiasis

Familial candidiasis is a rare condition characterized by persistent, recurrent infections caused by the Candida fungus. It commonly affects the skin, nails, and mucous membranes. This condition is associated with genetic mutations that affect the immune system’s ability to fight off Candida infections.

One of the genes commonly associated with Familial candidiasis is IL17RC. Mutations in this gene can impair the function of immune cells that produce a protein called IL-17, which helps protect against Candida infections. Another gene associated with this condition is CARD9. Mutations in the CARD9 gene can also weaken the immune response to Candida and increase susceptibility to recurrent infections.

Learning more about the genes associated with Familial candidiasis can provide valuable insights into the causes and inheritance pattern of this condition. It can also help in the development of diagnostic testing, targeted treatments, and resources for patients and healthcare providers.

For more information about the genes associated with Familial candidiasis, you can refer to the following resources:

  • The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database provides detailed scientific information about genetic diseases, including Familial candidiasis. You can find information on specific genes, their functions, and associated symptoms.
  • The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) offers a wealth of information about genes, genetic variants, and their associations with diseases. The NCBI’s Gene database provides access to data on genes associated with Familial candidiasis.
  • The Clinical Immunology Society (CIS) is a valuable resource for healthcare professionals and patients interested in learning more about immune-related conditions. Their website provides articles, guidelines, and updates on Familial candidiasis and other immunodeficiency disorders.
  • The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI) also provides information about immune-related conditions and resources for patients and healthcare providers. Their website includes articles, patient education materials, and clinical practice guidelines for diagnosis and management of Familial candidiasis.

By studying the genes associated with Familial candidiasis, researchers can gain a better understanding of the genetic basis of this condition and develop more targeted approaches for diagnosis, treatment, and prevention.

Inheritance

Familial candidiasis is a condition that can be inherited. It is passed down from parent to child through genetic inheritance. There are different patterns of inheritance associated with familial candidiasis, including autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive inheritance.

  • Autosomal Dominant Inheritance: In this pattern of inheritance, a person with one copy of the mutated gene for familial candidiasis has a 50% chance of passing on the condition to each of their children. The affected gene can be inherited from either parent.
  • Autosomal Recessive Inheritance: In this pattern of inheritance, both parents must carry a copy of the mutated gene in order for their child to be affected by familial candidiasis. Each child of two carrier parents has a 25% chance of inheriting the condition.

Information about the inheritance patterns and specific genes associated with familial candidiasis can be found in genetic information resources. These resources can help patients and their families learn more about the condition and understand the likelihood of inheritance based on the specific genetic mutations involved.

One resource that provides information about the genetic basis of familial candidiasis is the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database. OMIM is a comprehensive online catalog of human genes and genetic disorders. By searching for familial candidiasis in the database, patients and healthcare providers can access scientific articles, genetic testing information, and additional resources to support diagnosis and management of the condition.

Some genes commonly associated with familial candidiasis include CANDIDA, IL17RC, CARD9, and AMOS. These genes play a role in the immune system’s response to Candida infection, and mutations in these genes can lead to increased susceptibility to candidiasis.

Advocacy organizations and support groups can also provide information and resources for individuals and families affected by familial candidiasis. These organizations can offer guidance on genetic testing, connect patients with healthcare providers specializing in the condition, and provide emotional support for individuals living with familial candidiasis.

Further research and scientific advancements continue to provide insights into the genetic causes and inheritance patterns of familial candidiasis. It is important for individuals and healthcare providers to stay updated with the latest information to ensure the most effective diagnosis and management of the condition.

Other Names for This Condition

Other names for Familial Candidiasis include:

  • Candidiasis, Familial, with Oropharyngeal Lesions
  • Chronic Mucocutaneous Candidiasis
  • Candidiasis, Chronic Mucocutaneous, Autosomal Recessive 1
  • Candidiasis, Chronic Mucocutaneous, Autosomal Recessive 2
  • CANDF1
  • CANDF2
  • OKZ
  • Chronic Mucocutaneous Candidiasis, Autosomal Recessive
  • Candidemia, Susceptibility to
  • Candida Infection, Familial Acute Disseminated
  • Candidiasis, Tufting Enteropathy-Associated

Familial candidiasis is a genetic condition that causes persistent and recurrent infections with the fungus Candida. It is associated with immunodeficiency and can affect various mucous membranes and skin folds, including the nails. The condition is commonly inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern, although rare cases of autosomal dominant inheritance have also been reported.

Causes of familial candidiasis can be attributed to mutations in genes such as IL17RC, IL17F, IL17RA, STAT1, CARD9, and others. Genetic testing can confirm the diagnosis in some cases, and additional testing may be necessary to determine the specific gene involved.

Patients with familial candidiasis may experience symptoms such as oral thrush, cutaneous candidiasis, nail infections, and other manifestations of Candida overgrowth. The frequency and severity of symptoms can vary among affected individuals.

For more scientific information and insights about familial candidiasis, you can refer to the following resources:

  • PUBMED: A database of articles with abstracts on life sciences and biomedical topics. Search for “familial candidiasis” or specific genes associated with the condition.
  • OMIM: Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man database provides information on genetic conditions and associated genes. Search for “familial candidiasis” or specific genes involved in the condition.
  • GENETEST: A comprehensive catalog of genetic testing laboratories and available tests for various diseases, including familial candidiasis.
  • GRIMBACHER LAB: Scientific publications and references related to familial candidiasis, immunodeficiency, and related topics.
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For advocacy, support, and additional information about familial candidiasis and related conditions, you can also reach out to various organizations, such as the Candida and Candidiasis Patient Advocacy Associations, and the National Center for Health Information.

Additional Information Resources

For more information on Familial Candidiasis, consider checking the following resources:

  • Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) – A catalog of human genes and genetic disorders. It provides more insights on the symptoms, causes, and inheritance pattern of familial candidiasis. Visit OMIM to learn more.
  • PubMed – A scientific database that includes scientific articles and references on familial candidiasis. It offers valuable scientific information and resources for further research. Access PubMed for more articles and insights.
  • ClinVar – A freely accessible database of clinically relevant genetic variations. It contains information on genetic mutations, including genes associated with familial candidiasis. Explore ClinVar for more genetic information.
  • Support and Advocacy Groups – Support groups and advocacy organizations provide resources and support for individuals and families affected by familial candidiasis. Consider reaching out to organizations like the Candidiasis and Chronic Granulomatous Disease Foundation for more information and support.

Remember, familial candidiasis is a rare genetic condition with persistent candida infection, commonly affecting mucous membranes, nails, and other areas. Genetic testing and consultation with medical professionals are necessary for an accurate diagnosis and treatment plan.

Genetic Testing Information

Genetic testing plays a crucial role in diagnosing familial candidiasis. By analyzing an individual’s DNA, genetic testing can identify specific gene mutations that are associated with this condition. This information can help healthcare professionals determine the underlying genetic cause of the disease, provide insights into its inheritance pattern, and offer important information for patient management.

There are several genetic tests available for familial candidiasis. These tests can be categorized into two main types: single gene testing and gene panel testing. Single gene testing focuses on analyzing a specific gene known to be associated with the condition, such as CARD9 and IL17RC. On the other hand, gene panel testing involves analyzing multiple genes simultaneously to identify potential mutations that may be responsible for the disease.

Some commonly tested genes in familial candidiasis include CARD9, IL17RA, IL17F, IL17RC, and other genes involved in the immune response against Candida infection. These genes play a crucial role in the body’s ability to fight off Candida, and mutations in these genes can lead to increased susceptibility to Candida infections.

Genetic testing can be performed in specialized genetic testing laboratories or by genetic counselors. These tests may require a blood sample or a sample of nail clippings for analysis. The results of the genetic test can provide valuable information about the presence of specific gene mutations and the frequency of their occurrence in the patient population.

Patients and their families can benefit from genetic testing by obtaining a definitive diagnosis, understanding the genetic basis of the condition, and receiving support and resources from advocacy groups and rare disease organizations. Genetic testing can also help healthcare professionals tailor treatment plans and provide more accurate prognoses for patients with familial candidiasis.

For more information on genetic testing for familial candidiasis, the following resources may be helpful:

  • OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man): a comprehensive catalog of human genes and genetic disorders. OMIM provides detailed information about the genes associated with familial candidiasis.
  • PubMed: an online database of scientific articles. PubMed contains numerous articles that discuss genetic testing, the causes of familial candidiasis, and other related topics.
  • The Jeffrey Modell Foundation: a nonprofit organization that provides support and resources for patients with primary immunodeficiency diseases, including familial candidiasis.
  • The National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences: an organization that offers free educational resources and support for patients and healthcare professionals dealing with rare diseases.

By utilizing these resources and understanding the genetic basis of familial candidiasis through genetic testing, patients and healthcare professionals can gain valuable insights into the condition and develop more effective treatment strategies.

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center

The Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center is a catalog of genetic diseases. It provides free information and resources for patients and healthcare professionals to learn about rare genetic conditions. In the case of familial candidiasis, a rare genetic condition, the center provides valuable insights and references for further understanding.

Familial candidiasis is a condition characterized by persistent and recurrent Candida infection. It is commonly associated with mutations in the CARD9 gene. The center provides information about the inheritance pattern, symptoms, and testing options for this rare condition.

In addition to familial candidiasis, the center offers information on other rare genetic diseases associated with Candida infection. Some of the genes associated with susceptibility to Candida infection include IL17RC and CASP8. These resources provide a comprehensive overview of the causes, symptoms, and treatment options for these rare conditions.

For further scientific articles and references, the center cites sources such as OMIM and PubMed. These resources can be used to delve deeper into the genetic and scientific aspects of familial candidiasis, as well as to explore related research and discoveries.

For patients and families affected by familial candidiasis, the center offers support and advocacy resources. They can find information about support groups, genetic testing, and available treatment options. The center aims to empower patients and provide them with the necessary tools to navigate this rare genetic condition.

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Overall, the Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center is a valuable resource for understanding and managing familial candidiasis and other rare genetic conditions associated with Candida infection. With its wealth of information, patients and healthcare professionals can stay informed and make informed decisions about their health.

Patient Support and Advocacy Resources

Patients and their families who are affected by familial candidiasis may benefit from various support and advocacy resources to obtain information, seek guidance, and connect with others who share similar experiences. Here are some recommended resources:

  • Center for Chronic Immunodeficiency – The Center for Chronic Immunodeficiency at the University Medical Center, Freiburg is a renowned research and treatment center for immunodeficiency disorders, including familial candidiasis. Their website provides detailed information about the condition, testing, treatment, and ongoing research.
  • Grimbacher Lab – The Grimbacher Lab, led by Professor Bodo Grimbacher, is dedicated to advancing the understanding of primary immunodeficiency diseases, including those associated with candidiasis. Their website offers scientific articles, research updates, and resources for patients and healthcare professionals.
  • OMIM – Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) is a comprehensive database that catalogs genetic disorders and their associated genes. OMIM provides detailed information about the genetic causes of familial candidiasis, inheritance patterns, and related genes.
  • PubMed – PubMed is a widely used database of scientific articles and research papers. By searching for keywords such as “familial candidiasis” or specific gene names associated with the condition (e.g., IL17RC, CARD9), patients and their families can access the latest research and insights into the disease.
  • Health Advocacy Organizations – Some organizations focus on advocating for individuals with rare genetic diseases and supporting patients and their families. These organizations often provide resources, educational materials, and opportunities for connecting with others. Some examples include the National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) and the Candida and Fungal Infections Foundation.

These resources can provide patients and their families with additional information about familial candidiasis, genetic testing, treatment options, and management of symptoms. They can also offer support, advocacy, and a sense of community for those living with this rare condition.

Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM

OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) is a catalog of genes and diseases that provides valuable information about genetic conditions. It is a free resource that allows clinicians and researchers to learn more about the genetic basis of various diseases, including familial candidiasis susceptibility.

Familial candidiasis is a rare genetic condition characterized by a persistent and recurrent infection with the fungus Candida. It commonly affects mucous membranes, nails, and other areas of the body. The condition is commonly associated with mutations in genes such as IL17RC and CARD9, which play a part in the immune system’s response to Candida infection.

OMIM provides resources such as articles, references, and genetic testing information to support patients and researchers in understanding the condition. By exploring the catalog, one can gain insights into the genetic inheritance pattern, frequency, and other genetic causes associated with familial candidiasis.

Some of the genes associated with familial candidiasis susceptibility include IL17RC and CARD9. The catalog provides information on these genes, including their genetic location, function, and any known mutations that may cause susceptibility to candidiasis.

In addition to genetic insights, OMIM also provides advocacy and support resources for individuals and families affected by familial candidiasis. This includes information on clinical centers specializing in the condition, scientific articles, and patient support groups.

By using OMIM, clinicians and researchers can access the most up-to-date information about familial candidiasis susceptibility and other genetic conditions. The catalog offers a comprehensive overview of the genetic basis of diseases, allowing for better understanding, diagnosis, and management of these conditions.

Scientific Articles on PubMed

PubMed is a valuable resource for finding scientific articles and information about familial candidiasis. It provides a comprehensive collection of research studies and publications that focus on the genetic inheritance, susceptibility, symptoms, testing, and treatment of this condition.

Many articles on PubMed discuss the genetic basis of familial candidiasis, highlighting specific genes that are commonly associated with the condition. Some of the genes commonly mentioned in these articles include CARD9, IL17RC, and AMOS1. These genes play a crucial role in the body’s immune response against Candida infection.

Scientists and researchers utilize PubMed to gain insights about the frequency and pattern of familial candidiasis in different populations. By analyzing data from these studies, they can uncover important information about the condition’s prevalence, symptoms, and inheritance patterns.

In addition to genetic information, PubMed also contains resources about clinical testing for familial candidiasis. These resources provide detailed information about the various testing methods and guidelines for diagnosing this condition. They can be helpful for healthcare professionals who encounter patients with persistent Candida infections.

PubMed is also a reliable source for advocacy and support resources for individuals and families affected by familial candidiasis. The platform catalogs various support groups, patient advocacy organizations, and other resources that provide free information and support for those with this condition.

For more information on familial candidiasis and its association with genetic susceptibility, PubMed offers a variety of scientific articles and references. These resources can provide a deeper understanding of the condition and assist in better management of the symptoms and overall health.

References

  • Grimbacher, B., & Holland, S. M. (2012). Familial Candidiasis. In Genetic Susceptibility to Infectious Diseases (pp. 109-116). Springer.
  • Candidiasis. (n.d.). National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD). Retrieved from https://rarediseases.org/rare-diseases/candidiasis/
  • Familial Candidiasis. (n.d.). OMIM. Retrieved from https://omim.org/entry/614162
  • Amos, C. (2015). Genetic susceptibility to Candida infections. Human Molecular Genetics, 24(R1), R15-R20. doi:10.1093/hmg/ddv240
  • Card9 Immunodeficiency. (n.d.). Center for the Study of Primary Immunodeficiencies. Retrieved from https://www.cpipd.org/index.php/en/disorders/congenital-th2/408-card9-immunodefficiency