Ferric Carboxymaltose Injection

Ferric carboxymaltose injection is used to treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of red blood cells due to too little iron) in adults and children 1 year of age and older who cannot tolerate or who could not successfully be treated with iron supplements taken by mouth. This medication is also used to treat iron deficiency anemia in adults with chronic kidney disease (damage to the kidneys which may worsen over time and may cause the kidneys to stop working) who are not on dialysis. Ferric carboxymaltose injection is also used to treat iron-deficiency anemia and improve the ability to exercise in certain adults with congestive heart failure (a condition when your heart cannot pump enough blood to the other parts of the body). Ferric carboxymaltose injection is in a class of medications called iron replacement products. It works by replenishing iron stores so that the body can make more red blood cells.

🔔 How should this medicine be used?

Ferric carboxymaltose injection comes as a solution (liquid) to inject intravenously (into a vein) by a doctor or nurse in a medical office or hospital outpatient clinic. For the treatment of iron-deficiency anemia in patients who could not tolerate or be treated with oral supplements or who have chronic kidney disease, it is usually given as a total of 2 doses, spaced at least 7 days apart. It may also be given as a single dose in adults. For the treatment of iron-deficiency anemia and to improve the ability to exercise in adults with congestive heart failure, it is usually given once every 6 weeks for no more than a total of 5 doses. If your iron levels become low after you finish your treatment, your doctor may prescribe this medication again.

Ferric carboxymaltose injection may cause severe or life-threatening reactions during and shortly after you receive the medication. Your doctor will watch you carefully while you receive each dose of ferric carboxymaltose injection and for at least 30 minutes afterwards. Your doctor will also check your blood pressure frequently during this time. Tell your doctor if you experience any of the following symptoms during or after your injection: shortness of breath; wheezing; difficulty swallowing or breathing; hoarseness; swelling of the face, throat, tongue, lips, or eyes; hives; rash; itching; fainting; lightheadedness; dizziness; flushing of the face; nausea; cold, clammy skin; rapid, weak pulse; chest pain; or loss of consciousness. If you experience a severe reaction, your doctor will stop your infusion immediately and provide emergency medical treatment.

Ask your pharmacist or doctor for a copy of the manufacturer’s information for the patient.

See also  Travoprost Ophthalmic