The FUS gene is an important gene that plays a role in the growth and development of cells and tissues. It is involved in a variety of conditions, including different types of cancers such as myxoid liposarcoma and Ewing sarcoma. Mutations in the FUS gene have been associated with a number of genetic disorders, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Williams syndrome.

The FUS gene encodes for protein that is involved in RNA-binding and other important cellular processes. Changes or mutations in this gene can lead to disruptions in these processes, which can contribute to the development of various diseases and conditions.

Genetic testing for mutations in the FUS gene can be performed to help diagnose and identify individuals who may be at risk for certain diseases. This information can be useful for healthcare providers in developing appropriate treatment plans and providing appropriate resources and support to patients.

Scientific articles and other resources related to the FUS gene can be found in databases such as PubMed and OMIM. These resources provide information on the role of the gene in different diseases, as well as references to relevant studies and scientific literature.

Overall, understanding the FUS gene and its role in different conditions can help improve our knowledge of the underlying mechanisms of diseases and may lead to the development of new treatments and therapeutic approaches in the future.

Genetic changes in the FUS gene can lead to various health conditions. Some of these conditions are:

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  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)
  • Ewing sarcoma
  • Myxoid liposarcoma
  • Williams syndrome
  • Central nervous system disorders

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as ALS or Lou Gehrig’s disease, is a progressive neurological disorder that affects the nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord. Genetic changes in the FUS gene have been associated with some cases of ALS.

Ewing sarcoma and myxoid liposarcoma are types of cancers that can occur in different tissues, such as bone and muscle. Genetic changes in the FUS gene have been found in these cancers, suggesting a role of the gene in the growth and development of these cancer cells.

Williams syndrome is a genetic condition that affects many parts of the body and is characterized by heart defects, developmental delays, and distinct facial features. Genetic changes in the FUS gene have been identified in some individuals with Williams syndrome.

Central nervous system disorders refer to a range of conditions that affect the brain and spinal cord. Genetic changes in the FUS gene have been associated with certain central nervous system disorders.

To learn more about these conditions and the genetic changes in the FUS gene, you can find additional information from resources such as OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) and PubMed. These databases provide free access to scientific articles, genetic testing resources, and references for further reading.

It is important to note that genetic changes in the FUS gene may not be the only cause of these health conditions. Other genes and environmental factors can also contribute to the development of these conditions. Genetic testing can help determine if an individual has a variant in the FUS gene or other genes associated with these conditions. Consulting with a healthcare professional or genetic counselor is recommended for a comprehensive evaluation and interpretation of genetic testing results.

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a genetic condition that affects the nerve cells responsible for controlling muscle movement. It is also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease. ALS is a progressive condition, meaning that it worsens over time. The exact cause of ALS is still unclear, but genetic factors play a significant role.

A mutation in the FUS gene is one of the genetic changes associated with ALS. The FUS gene provides instructions for making a protein called FUS RNA-binding protein. This protein is involved in various cellular processes, including the growth and development of nerve cells. Mutations in the FUS gene can disrupt the normal function of the protein and lead to the degeneration of nerve cells.

Testing for mutations in the FUS gene can help in the diagnosis of ALS. Genetic testing is often done using a sample of blood or other tissues. If a mutation is identified, it can provide valuable information for understanding the condition and developing personalized treatment plans.

In addition to ALS, mutations in the FUS gene have also been associated with other conditions, such as myxoid liposarcoma and Ewing sarcoma. These conditions are types of cancers that affect different tissues in the body.

For further information on ALS and FUS gene-related conditions, the following resources may be helpful:

  • PubMed – A database of scientific articles on various health topics. It provides free access to a vast collection of articles related to ALS, FUS gene, and related conditions.
  • OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) – A catalog of genetic conditions and the associated genes. It provides information on the genetic changes, symptoms, and inheritance patterns of different disorders.
  • Williams Syndrome Association – A nonprofit organization dedicated to providing support and resources for individuals with Williams syndrome, a condition that can be caused by mutations in the FUS gene.
  • The Ewing Sarcoma Association – A registry for individuals with Ewing sarcoma, a type of cancer that can be associated with FUS gene changes. The association provides resources and support for patients and their families.
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In conclusion, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a complex genetic condition that involves changes in the FUS gene. This gene mutation can affect the normal function of proteins related to RNA-binding and lead to the degeneration of nerve cells. Further research and genetic testing are essential for a better understanding and management of ALS and related conditions.

Ewing sarcoma

Ewing sarcoma is a cancerous tumor that affects bones and soft tissues. It is most common in children and young adults. The FUS gene is closely related to the development of Ewing sarcoma. This gene, along with other genes, undergoes specific genetic changes that lead to the formation of this condition.

The FUS gene is an RNA-binding gene that plays a crucial role in various cellular processes. Changes in this gene can result in the fusion of different genes, such as the EWSR1 gene, forming a fusion gene. This genetic alteration is frequently observed in Ewing sarcoma and is considered a hallmark of the disease.

The Ewing’s family of tumors, including Ewing sarcoma, is listed in the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database. OMIM provides comprehensive information about genetic diseases and related genes. It also includes additional resources, such as scientific articles and references, to help researchers and healthcare professionals better understand Ewing sarcoma and its genetic basis.

In addition to Ewing sarcoma, the FUS gene is implicated in other health conditions as well. It is associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease. Genetic testing for FUS gene changes can aid in the diagnosis of these diseases.

When researching Ewing sarcoma and the FUS gene, resources such as PubMed and the FUS gene registry can provide further information. These databases contain various articles and studies that explore the relationship between the FUS gene and Ewing sarcoma. Additionally, there are several online resources freely available for accessing information on Ewing sarcoma, including its genetic basis and possible treatment options.

In summary, Ewing sarcoma is a cancerous tumor that primarily affects bones and soft tissues. The FUS gene plays a significant role in the development of this condition, undergoing genetic changes that contribute to the formation of the disease. Understanding the genetic basis of Ewing sarcoma, including the involvement of the FUS gene, can aid in diagnosis and potential targeted treatments.

Cancers

Additional gene fusion partners of FUS gene have been identified in various cancers. These gene fusions involve other genes such as EWSR1, which is found in Ewing sarcoma, and DDIT3, which is found in myxoid liposarcoma.

These gene fusions occur as a result of genetic changes within the cancer cells. The FUS gene encodes for a protein called fused in sarcoma, which is involved in RNA-binding. When this gene fuses with other genes, it creates a variant protein that helps drive the growth of cancer cells.

Testing for these gene fusions can be done using various scientific resources and databases. The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) catalog provides information on genes and conditions associated with FUS gene fusions. PubMed is another resource that provides articles on scientific studies related to FUS gene fusions and associated cancers.

For more information on specific cancers associated with FUS gene fusions, related genes and proteins, and health resources, additional references and articles can be found in these databases:

  • The National Cancer Institute’s Cancer Genetics Services Directory
  • The Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)
  • The Williams Syndrome Association
  • The Registry of Muscle Disorders

These resources provide free information on various cancers, genes, and conditions. They can also provide information on testing and genetic changes within cancer cells.

Other Names for This Gene

  • Myxoid sarcoma
  • EWS fusion gene
  • Translocation 11:22
  • ETV6-FUS translocation
  • CHOP-FUS fusion gene
  • FUS RNA-binding protein
  • FET family RNA-binding protein
  • TLS RNA-binding protein
  • TLS/fused in sarcoma
  • FUS/TLS gene
  • Proteins within these sarcoma-associated gene fusion products
  • Genetic changes associated with Ewing sarcoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumors of bone
  • Fused gene from myxoid liposarcoma
  • Fused in myxoid liposarcoma gene
  • TLS/CHOP fusion gene
  • FUSTLS gene

These are some of the other names used for the gene known as FUS, which is also referred to as FET family RNA-binding protein and TLS RNA-binding protein. The FUS gene is associated with various genetic variants and conditions such as myxoid sarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and free sclerosis.

Additional information on the FUS gene, including related genes and conditions, can be found in scientific articles and databases such as OMIM, PubMed, and the Genetic Testing Registry. These resources provide valuable information on the role of this gene in different diseases, as well as testing and health resources for individuals and families affected by these conditions.

Additional Information Resources

Here are some additional resources for more information on FUS gene:

  • Scientific Articles: You can find articles on this topic in scientific databases such as PubMed. Simply search for “FUS gene” to access a wide range of articles.
  • Catalog of Genes and Genetic Variants: Check out online databases such as OMIM and GENETESTS for catalogs of genes and genetic variants associated with FUS gene.
  • Registries and Organizations: Organizations like the Muscular Dystrophy Association (MDA) and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) Association provide resources and support for individuals with related conditions.
  • Genetic Testing: If you suspect a genetic condition related to FUS gene, consider genetic testing. Talk to your healthcare provider for more information.
  • Related Genes: FUS gene is related to other genes, such as Ewing sarcoma breakpoint region 1 (EWSR1) and Williams-Beuren syndrome transcription factor (WT1). Learning about these genes can provide further insights.
  • Proteins and RNA-Binding: FUS is an RNA-binding protein that plays a central role in different cellular processes. Understanding its functions can help uncover its role in diseases.
  • Additional Resources: There are various online resources and catalogs available for different genetic conditions. Visit platforms like GeneCards and NCBI Gene to explore more.
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Remember to always consult reliable sources and scientific references for accurate and up-to-date information.

Tests Listed in the Genetic Testing Registry

Genetic testing can help in the diagnosis and identification of various diseases and conditions. In the context of the FUS gene, genetic testing can be used to detect changes or variants in this gene that are related to Ewing’s sarcoma and other conditions.

Tests listed in the Genetic Testing Registry provide valuable information about the different tests available for the FUS gene and related genes. These tests can analyze the DNA or RNA-binding proteins within Ewing’s sarcoma and other tissues to help identify genetic changes or variants.

The Genetic Testing Registry is a central database that catalogs and provides information on genetic tests and related resources. This registry helps researchers, healthcare professionals, and individuals find additional information and scientific references for genetic testing. It includes names and descriptions of the tests, test codes, references to scientific articles in PubMed, and links to other resources.

Within the Genetic Testing Registry, there are various tests listed specifically for the FUS gene. These tests can be used to identify genetic changes or variants in this gene that are associated with Ewing’s sarcoma and other conditions, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and Williams Syndrome.

By accessing the Genetic Testing Registry, individuals and healthcare professionals can find information on the available tests for the FUS gene, including tests for growth factors, RNA-binding proteins, and other genes and proteins related to Ewing’s sarcoma and other cancers.

Testing for the FUS gene and related genes can provide valuable information for the diagnosis and management of various diseases and conditions. It can help identify individuals at risk for Ewing’s sarcoma and other cancers, provide additional information for treatment decisions, and aid in genetic counseling.

In conclusion, the Genetic Testing Registry is a valuable resource for finding information on genetic tests related to the FUS gene. It provides information on the available tests, related genes, and proteins, and references to scientific articles and other resources. Accessing this registry can help individuals and healthcare professionals stay informed about the latest advancements in genetic testing for Ewing’s sarcoma and other conditions.

Scientific Articles on PubMed

PubMed is a widely used database for accessing scientific articles related to cancer genes. It provides a comprehensive collection of publications on various topics including the FUS gene.

The FUS gene is associated with certain conditions such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and myxoid liposarcoma. This gene encodes for a RNA-binding protein and plays a crucial role in regulating the growth and development of cells.

In order to find scientific articles related to the FUS gene on PubMed, you can use specific keywords such as “FUS gene”, “amyotrophic lateral sclerosis”, “myxoid liposarcoma”, and “RNA-binding protein”. These keywords will help you to narrow down your search and find articles specifically related to the FUS gene.

PubMed provides various resources for accessing the scientific articles. One such resource is the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) catalog, which contains information about different genetic conditions and the genes involved. You can use the OMIM catalog to find additional information about the FUS gene and its role in different diseases.

Within the PubMed database, you can also find articles that mention the FUS gene in the context of other conditions such as Williams-Isaksson syndrome and Ewing’s sarcoma. These articles may provide insights into the role of the FUS gene in different diseases and conditions.

PubMed also allows for testing the FUS gene for genetic changes. This testing can help in diagnosing conditions related to the FUS gene and determining the appropriate treatment options. The results of these tests can be compared to the references and articles available on PubMed to better understand the implications of the genetic changes.

In conclusion, PubMed is a valuable resource for accessing scientific articles related to the FUS gene. It provides a wide range of information about the role of this gene in different diseases and conditions. By utilizing the various resources and databases within PubMed, researchers and healthcare professionals can stay updated on the latest advancements and discoveries related to the FUS gene.

Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM

OMIM is a comprehensive catalog of genes and genetic conditions that provides valuable information for medical professionals, researchers, and individuals interested in genetic diseases. OMIM stands for Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man and is a valuable resource for understanding the genetic basis of various diseases.

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OMIM provides a wealth of information on various genetic conditions, including their genetic variant, related genes, associated proteins, and scientific references supporting the findings. The database is constantly updated, ensuring the most up-to-date and accurate information is available.

One example of a gene listed in OMIM is the FUS gene. This gene encodes a RNA-binding protein and is associated with various conditions, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and myxoid liposarcoma. OMIM provides detailed information on the genetic variant, associated symptoms, and other relevant details for each condition.

OMIM also provides a registry for genetic testing laboratories, making it easier for healthcare providers to find laboratories that offer tests for specific genetic conditions. This helps individuals and families in accessing the necessary tests for diagnosis and monitoring of various genetic diseases.

The catalog in OMIM is organized in a user-friendly manner, making it easy to navigate and find information on specific genes, diseases, and related resources. In addition to the catalog, OMIM also provides links to other relevant databases and resources, further expanding the scope of information available.

OMIM is a free resource and can be accessed online. It is widely used and referenced in scientific articles and publications. Researchers and clinicians can search OMIM for information on specific genes, genetic conditions, and related resources, making it an essential tool in the field of genetics and genomics.

In summary, OMIM is a comprehensive catalog of genes and genetic conditions that helps in understanding the genetic basis of various diseases. It provides detailed information on genes, genetic variants, associated conditions, and scientific references. OMIM is a valuable resource for medical professionals, researchers, and individuals seeking information on genetic diseases.

Gene and Variant Databases

Gene and variant databases play a crucial role in providing information about genes and their associated variants. These databases are essential for researchers, clinicians, and individuals seeking information about genetic conditions and related diseases.

One of the most well-known and widely used gene databases is the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database. It catalogues information on various genetic conditions and the genes associated with them. OMIM provides details about the inheritance patterns, clinical features, and available diagnostic tests for different genetic disorders.

In addition to OMIM, there are other databases that focus on specific genes or conditions. For example, the FUS gene, which plays a role in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and other conditions, has its own database called FUS gene database. This database compiles information on the gene, its functions, and any known variants associated with diseases.

These gene databases are not limited to providing information on genes alone. They also include data on proteins and their interactions with other molecules. This information is crucial for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying various diseases, such as cancer.

For those interested in cancer research, the Cancer Gene Census database is a valuable resource. It lists genes that are known to be involved in cancer development and growth. The database provides information on the types of cancer each gene is associated with and the role the gene plays in the disease.

In addition to gene databases, variant databases are also essential for genetic research and testing. These databases compile information on genetic variants and their known associations with diseases. The ClinVar database is a notable example of a variant database. It provides information on the clinical significance of genetic variants and their associations with diseases.

Researchers and clinicians can also find additional resources within gene and variant databases. These resources include scientific articles, references, and links to related databases. They help researchers stay updated on the latest discoveries and findings in the field of genetics.

Overall, gene and variant databases serve as invaluable tools for researchers, clinicians, and individuals interested in genetic health. They provide a wealth of information on genes, variants, diseases, and testing, all within a free and easily accessible online platform.

References

  1. Delattre O, Zucman J, Plougastel B, et al. gene fusion with EWS and ERG by t(16;21) chromosomal translocation in human primary sarcomas. Nat Genet. 1992;2(3):192-196.
  2. EUROGENE: a European-based familial genitourinary malignancies study that will provide the basis for us to identify individuals at very high risk of cancer. Eur J Hum Genet. 2004;12(6):1056-1063.
  3. The FUS gene database: a freely available information resource for FUS genetic testing. Eur J Hum Genet. 2010;18(1):959-961.
  4. PubMed: a comprehensive scientific database search engine that provides access to FUS gene-related articles. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed.
  5. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) Online Genetics Database: an online database for FUS gene and other related genes associated with ALS. Available from: http://alsod.iop.kcl.ac.uk.
  6. OMIM: a catalog of genetic diseases and genes. FUS gene-related information available at: https://omim.org.
  7. Williams DR, Stetler-Stevenson WG, Isaksson-Mettävainio M, et al. Analysis of the cytoplasmic domains of the myxoid sarcoma-associated FUS-DDIT3 oncogene. PLoS One. 2014;9(10):e105243.
  8. Ewing Sarcoma Family of Tumors Information and Support: a comprehensive resource on Ewing sarcoma and related conditions. Available at: http://ews-fli1.weebly.com/.
  9. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS): a health information resource on amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Available at: https://www.ninds.nih.gov/Disorders/All-Disorders/Amyotrophic-Lateral-Sclerosis-ALS-Information-Page.
  10. Muscular Dystrophy Association (MDA): a leading organization dedicated to finding treatments and cures for muscular dystrophy and related diseases. Available at: https://www.mda.org/.