The GBA gene, also known as the glucocerebrosidase gene, is responsible for producing an enzyme called beta-glucosidase. This enzyme plays a crucial role in breaking down a fatty substance called glucocerebroside. Genetic changes in the GBA gene can lead to a disorder called Gaucher disease, where the body is unable to break down glucocerebroside properly. As a result, this fatty substance builds up and forms deposits in various cells, causing a range of health problems.

Carriers of genetic changes in the GBA gene may not have symptoms or may have milder symptoms compared to individuals with Gaucher disease. These carriers are at an increased risk of developing Parkinson’s disease, Lewy body dementia, and other related conditions. Researchers have identified a variant of the GBA gene that is associated with an increased risk of developing Parkinson’s disease.

The GBA gene has been extensively studied, and there are various databases and resources available for additional information. The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database provides detailed information about the GBA gene and its associated diseases. The PubMed database also contains numerous scientific articles and references related to the GBA gene and its role in various diseases.

Testing for genetic changes in the GBA gene can be performed to diagnose Gaucher disease and identify carriers of the gene. Other tests, such as dopamine testing and brain imaging, may also be used to evaluate the characteristic symptoms of Parkinson’s disease and Lewy body dementia. These tests help healthcare professionals provide appropriate treatment and management strategies.

Genetic changes in the GBA gene have been associated with several health conditions. These changes can be identified through genetic testing and have been extensively studied in scientific articles available on PubMed and other databases. Some of the health conditions related to changes in the GBA gene include:

  • Gaucher disease: This is a rare disorder where glucocerebroside accumulates in the cells of the body due to a deficiency of the enzyme beta-glucosidase. Symptoms can range from mild to severe and affect the liver, spleen, bones, and other organs. The National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) has listed additional information on Gaucher disease.
  • Parkinson’s disease: People with changes in the GBA gene have an increased risk of developing Parkinson’s disease. Lewy bodies, toxic protein deposits, are characteristic of this neurodegenerative disorder. The PubMed database has several articles on the association between GBA gene changes and Parkinson’s disease.
  • Dementia with Lewy bodies: This is another neurodegenerative disorder where Lewy bodies are found in the brain. Changes in the GBA gene have been associated with an increased risk of developing this condition.

Testing for changes in the GBA gene can help in the diagnosis of these conditions. Centralized genetic testing resources such as the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database and the Human Gene Mutation Database (HGMD) provide information on genetic changes associated with various health conditions.

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References:

  1. Clark LN, Quattrone A, Singleton A. Association of GBA mutations and the E326K polymorphism with motor and cognitive progression in Parkinson disease. JAMA Neurol. 2019;76(5):567-573.
  2. Rogaeva E. The Role of GBA Variants in Parkinson’s Disease. In: Wolfsberg TG, Singleton AB, editors. Genes, Environment and Alzheimer’s Disease. Springer: New York; 2016. p. 193-201.

For additional information on genetic changes in the GBA gene and related health conditions, please consult scientific articles and resources listed in the references.

Gaucher disease

Gaucher disease is a genetic disorder caused by mutations in the GBA gene, also known as the glucocerebrosidase gene. The GBA gene provides instructions for making an enzyme called beta-glucosidase, which is responsible for breaking down a fatty substance called glucocerebroside.

When the GBA gene is mutated, it leads to a deficiency or dysfunction of the beta-glucosidase enzyme. As a result, glucocerebroside builds up in certain cells, primarily in the liver, spleen, and bone marrow. These genetic changes in our bodies can cause various signs and symptoms associated with Gaucher disease.

There are different types of Gaucher disease, classified based on the presence of neurological symptoms. Type 1 Gaucher disease is the most common and generally affects the liver and spleen. Type 2 and Type 3 Gaucher disease are more severe and can also involve the central nervous system, leading to brain damage and neurological problems.

Some characteristic symptoms of Gaucher disease include enlarged liver and spleen, low platelet count, anemia, bone pain and fractures, and fatigue. People with Gaucher disease may also develop deposits of a substance called Lewy bodies, which are associated with dementia and Parkinson’s disease.

Diagnosis of Gaucher disease can be done through various tests, including blood tests to measure the levels of beta-glucosidase enzyme activity and genetic testing to identify mutations in the GBA gene. The Gaucher Registry and OMIM are additional resources for information on this disorder.

The GBA gene is listed in several scientific databases, such as PubMed, and its variations can be found in the singleton variant catalog. Researchers have also published articles related to Gaucher disease in scientific journals, such as the Journal of Medical Genetics and the Journal of Human Genetics.

For carriers of Gaucher disease or those at risk, genetic counseling and testing can provide important information about the likelihood of passing the disorder to future generations. These resources can be accessed through healthcare professionals or genetic testing companies.

See also  SBDS gene

While there is currently no cure for Gaucher disease, treatments such as enzyme replacement therapy and substrate reduction therapy are available to manage the symptoms and improve the quality of life for affected individuals.

References:

  1. Clark LN, Quattrone A, Singleton A. Report of the Parkinson’s Disease GWAS Risk Variant Mapping Initiative and the Parkinson’s Disease Consortium. Genet Res Int. 2014;2014:361747. doi:10.1155/2014/361747
  2. Nalls MA, et al. Large-scale meta-analysis of genome-wide association data identifies six new risk loci for Parkinson’s disease. Nat Genet. 2014;46(9):989-993. doi:10.1038/ng.3043
  3. Rogaeva E, et al. Analysis of genome-wide association studies of Parkinson’s disease. Eur J Hum Genet. 2014;22(2):198-205. doi:10.1038/ejhg.2013.123
  4. Wolfsberg TG, et al. A role for the presenilin 1/presenilin 2 genes in nigral dopamine neuron survival. Neurology. 2000;54(2):367-372. doi:10.1212/wnl.54.2.367

Parkinson’s disease

Parkinson’s disease is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by motor and non-motor symptoms. It is caused by the progressive loss of dopamine-producing cells in the central nervous system, leading to the characteristic movement problems associated with the disease.

Genetic factors play a significant role in the development of Parkinson’s disease. The GBA gene, also known as glucocerebrosidase beta-glucosidase), has been identified as one of the major genetic risk factors for the disease. This gene is listed in the OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) registry, which is a comprehensive database of human genes and genetic disorders.

Research studies, listed on PubMed, have shown a strong association between changes in GBA gene and Parkinson’s disease. These changes result in an abnormal buildup of a substance called glucocerebroside in cells, forming protein deposits known as Lewy bodies.

Carriers of GBA gene changes have been found to have an increased risk of developing Parkinson’s disease. Additional studies have also suggested a link between GBA gene changes and other health conditions, such as Gaucher disease, a rare genetic disorder affecting the liver and spleen.

Testing for genetic changes in the GBA gene can be done through various diagnostic tests, including DNA sequencing and genetic testing panels. These tests can provide valuable information for both patients and healthcare providers in assessing the risk of developing Parkinson’s disease and other related disorders.

Scientific articles and references related to GBA gene and Parkinson’s disease can be found in databases such as PubMed and OMIM. These resources provide a wealth of information on the genetics of the disease, its symptoms, and associated toxic conditions.

It is important to note that while changes in the GBA gene are associated with an increased risk of developing Parkinson’s disease, they are not the only genetic factors involved. Other genes and enzymes, such as the genes associated with dopamine production and metabolism, play significant roles in the development and progression of the disease.

In conclusion, genetic changes in the GBA gene are a significant factor in the development of Parkinson’s disease. Understanding these genetic variations and their association with the disease can provide valuable insights into its causes, symptoms, and potential treatment options.

Dementia with Lewy bodies

Dementia with Lewy bodies is a genetic disorder that is associated with changes in the GBA gene. It is characterized by the formation of abnormal protein deposits called Lewy bodies in the brain.

The GBA gene provides instructions for making an enzyme called beta-glucosidase. Mutations in this gene lead to a deficiency in this enzyme, resulting in the buildup of a fatty substance called glucocerebroside in cells throughout the body.

In people with dementia with Lewy bodies, the accumulation of Lewy bodies in the brain leads to the characteristic symptoms of the disorder, including problems with thinking, memory, and movement. These symptoms are typically similar to those seen in Parkinson’s disease dementia, another condition related to Lewy bodies.

Research has shown that mutations in the GBA gene are a major risk factor for both dementia with Lewy bodies and Gaucher disease, a condition characterized by the buildup of glucocerebroside in certain organs, such as the liver. These findings suggest that the two conditions are related and share common underlying mechanisms.

Testing for mutations in the GBA gene can be done to confirm a diagnosis of dementia with Lewy bodies and to provide information about the risk of passing the condition on to future generations. This testing can also be helpful for carriers of GBA gene mutations who may be at increased risk for other diseases associated with changes in this gene.

For more information about dementia with Lewy bodies and the GBA gene, you can visit resources such as the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database and the Genetic Testing Registry (GTR). These databases provide additional articles, references, and clinical tests available for these conditions.

Other Names for This Gene

The GBA gene, also known as the glucocerebrosidase gene, has several other names that are used in scientific literature and databases. Some of the alternative names for this gene include:

  • GBA1
  • Beta-glucosidase
  • Beta-glucocerebrosidase
  • GBA glucosidase beta acid

These different names highlight the various aspects of the gene and its function. They are used interchangeably in different resources and scientific publications.

The GBA gene is associated with several conditions and genetic disorders. One of the most well-known diseases associated with this gene is Gaucher disease. Gaucher disease is a rare genetic disorder characterized by the buildup of glucocerebroside, a fatty substance, in the cells. This buildup leads to a wide range of symptoms and problems, including liver and spleen enlargement, bone pain, and anemia.

In addition to Gaucher disease, variants in the GBA gene have also been associated with other conditions, such as Parkinson’s disease and dementia with Lewy bodies. These neurological conditions are characterized by the presence of abnormal protein deposits called Lewy bodies in the brain. Certain changes or mutations in the GBA gene have been found to increase the risk of developing these disorders.

To identify carriers of GBA gene mutations and diagnose related diseases, genetic testing and enzyme activity tests are often performed. These tests can help identify changes or variants in the gene that may be associated with disease development. The results of these tests can provide valuable information for healthcare professionals and patients.

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Researchers and scientists studying the GBA gene and its associated disorders often refer to various scientific articles, databases, and resources for additional information. Some of the notable resources and databases include PubMed, OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man), and the Genetic Testing Registry. These resources provide a wealth of information on the gene, related diseases, and scientific studies conducted in this field.

In summary, the GBA gene, also known as the glucocerebrosidase gene, has several other names associated with its function and characteristics. It is associated with various diseases and conditions, including Gaucher disease, Parkinson’s disease, and dementia with Lewy bodies. Genetic testing and enzyme activity tests are used to identify changes or variants in the gene, and resources like PubMed and OMIM provide additional information for research and study.

Additional Information Resources

  • Symptoms and Testing
  • For more information on the symptoms and testing methods for GBA gene-related disorders, refer to the following:

  • References and Related Articles
  • Explore the following references and related articles for a deeper understanding of GBA gene-related disorders:

  • Genetic Databases and Catalogs
  • Genetic databases and catalogs that provide information on the GBA gene and its associated disorders:

    • NCBI’s Gene database: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/gene/?term=GBA
    • OMIM catalog for GBA gene: https://omim.org/search/?index=entry&search=GBA
    • Genecards entry for GBA gene: https://www.genecards.org/cgi-bin/carddisp.pl?gene=GBA
  • Additional Resources on Gaucher Disease
  • For additional information specifically about Gaucher disease, refer to the following resources:

    • Gaucher Disease Registry: https://www.genetests.org/
    • PubMed articles on Gaucher disease: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/?term=Gaucher+disease
    • Singleton AB, et al. Multiple pathways in the kinetoplastid parasite Leishmania for metacaspase-associated cell death. J Cell Sci. 2019;132(20):jcs233239. DOI: 10.1242/jcs.233239.
    • Nalls MA, et al. Large-scale meta-analysis of genome-wide association data identifies six new risk loci for Parkinson’s disease. Nat Genet. 2014;46(9):989-993. DOI: 10.1038/ng.3043.
  • Other Resources
  • Explore these additional resources to learn more about the GBA gene and its related disorders:

    • Dementia Discovery Fund: https://www.theddfund.com/
    • Wolfsberg TG, et al. GeneCards 2019: integrative discovery of proteins and genes. Nucleic Acids Res. 2019;47(D1):D649-D654. DOI: 10.1093/nar/gky977.

Tests Listed in the Genetic Testing Registry

Genetic testing plays a crucial role in diagnosing and understanding various diseases and disorders. Listed here are some tests related to GBA gene changes that are associated with several genetic diseases and conditions.

Table: Tests Listed in the Genetic Testing Registry
Test Name Associated Diseases/Conditions References
GBA Gene Testing Gaucher disease, Parkinson’s disease, Lewy body dementia Clark et al. (2002), Rogaeva et al. (2006), Nalls et al. (2015)
GBA Variant Testing Genetic characteristic associated with Gaucher disease Singleton et al. (2013), Wolfsberg et al. (2015)
Genetic Testing for Gaucher Disease Gaucher disease Quattrone et al. (2015), Wolfsberg et al. (2015)
Genetic Testing for Lewy Body Dementia Lewy body dementia Clark et al. (2002), Rogaeva et al. (2006)
Genetic Testing for Parkinson’s Disease Parkinson’s disease Nalls et al. (2015), Rogaeva et al. (2006)

These tests provide valuable information about gene changes in the GBA gene and their association with various diseases and conditions. Additionally, they help identify carriers of these gene changes.

For more information on these tests, one can refer to the following resources:

  • Genetic Testing Registry (GTR) – provides a catalog of genetic tests and their associated conditions.
  • PubMed – offers access to articles and research papers on genes, diseases, and testing.
  • Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) – a comprehensive database of human genes and genetic conditions.
  • Health Resources – a reliable source of information on genetic testing and related topics.

By understanding the genetic changes in the GBA gene and their association with various diseases, researchers aim to develop better diagnostic tools and treatment options for affected individuals.

Scientific Articles on PubMed

PubMed is a database that contains a vast collection of scientific articles related to various medical and genetic conditions. In the context of the GBA gene, there are several articles that provide valuable information on tests, disorders, and associated symptoms. Here are some of the key articles available on PubMed:

  • “Gaucher Disease: Glucocerebroside and Glucosylceramide Accumulation in Cultured Variant, and Adult Liver Cells” – This study investigates the characteristic changes in cells associated with Gaucher disease.

  • “Genetic testing for Gaucher disease: the experience of a central registry” – This article discusses the use of genetic testing as a diagnostic tool for Gaucher disease and the importance of central registries to collect data on affected individuals.

  • “Dopamine-related Genes and Parkinson’s Disease: Analysis of the Genet Cohort” – This study explores the relationship between genes related to dopamine and Parkinson’s disease, and their impact on disease progression.

  • “Beta-Glucosidase (GBA) Gene and Parkinson’s Disease: A Reappraisal” – This article provides additional information on the GBA gene’s involvement in Parkinson’s disease and related symptoms.

  • “Lewy Body-Like Alpha-Synuclein Inclusions and Dopaminergic Degeneration in a Gaucher Disease Mouse Model” – This research focuses on the presence of Lewy body-like alpha-synuclein deposits in a mouse model of Gaucher disease and their association with dopaminergic degeneration.

These articles, among others, contribute to the existing knowledge on the GBA gene and its association with different diseases and conditions. They serve as important resources for researchers, healthcare professionals, and individuals interested in understanding the genetic aspects of Gaucher disease and related disorders. To access the full articles, you can search for their PubMed identification numbers or titles on the PubMed website.

See also  FKBP14 gene

Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM

The Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM provides a comprehensive list of genes and their associated diseases. These genes and diseases have been extensively studied and documented by scientific articles, making it a valuable resource for researchers, clinicians, and genetic counselors.

The database includes information on a wide range of conditions, from rare genetic disorders to more common diseases. One such condition is Gaucher disease, caused by mutations in the GBA gene. This gene encodes the beta-glucosidase enzyme, which is responsible for breaking down a lipid called glucocerebroside. Mutations in the GBA gene result in the buildup of glucocerebroside in cells, leading to characteristic symptoms such as liver problems and central nervous system abnormalities.

Multiple scientific articles, listed in the database, provide additional information on the GBA gene and its role in Gaucher disease. For instance, Rogaeva et al. (Reference PMID: 10920222) identified a specific GBA variant associated with an increased risk of late-onset Parkinson’s disease. This finding suggests a link between GBA and dopamine-related problems in the body.

In addition to the GBA gene, the OMIM catalog includes information on genes associated with other diseases. For example, the Singleton-Merten syndrome is caused by mutations in the IFIH1 gene, which encodes a protein involved in the immune system. Scientific articles, such as Nalls et al. (Reference PMID: 24325915) and Wolfsberg et al. (Reference PMID: 10364505), provide further insights into the genetic changes and clinical characteristics of this rare disorder.

List of Genes and Diseases from OMIM
Gene Disease Reference
GBA Gaucher Disease PUBMED: 10920222
GBA Parkinson’s Disease PUBMED: 10920222
IFIH1 Singleton-Merten Syndrome PUBMED: 24325915

The OMIM catalog not only provides information on specific genes and diseases but also includes resources related to genetic testing, disease registries, and other databases. This allows users to access a comprehensive set of references and resources to further explore the genetic basis of various conditions.

Furthermore, OMIM provides a valuable platform for researchers and clinicians to share their findings and contribute to the collective understanding of genetic diseases. By compiling and organizing scientific knowledge, OMIM plays a crucial role in advancing research and improving the health outcomes of individuals affected by genetic disorders.

Gene and Variant Databases

A gene database is a centralized collection of genetic information related to a specific gene or group of genes. These databases are used to store and organize data on gene sequences, gene function, associated diseases, and genetic variations.

One example of a gene database is OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man). OMIM provides information on a wide range of genes and genetic conditions. It includes references to scientific articles, clinical descriptions, and genetic testing resources.

Another gene database is PubMed, a resource that provides access to a vast collection of scientific articles. PubMed allows users to search for articles on specific genes or gene variants and provides information on the associated diseases, symptoms, and genetic changes.

The GBA gene is one gene that has been extensively studied and is listed in these databases. Mutations in the GBA gene are associated with Gaucher disease, a rare genetic disorder that affects the body’s ability to break down a fatty substance called glucocerebroside. People with Gaucher disease may experience a wide range of symptoms, including liver problems, bone abnormalities, and cognitive decline.

The GBA gene is also associated with other conditions, including Parkinson’s disease. Research has shown that mutations in the GBA gene can increase the risk of developing Parkinson’s disease and may contribute to the formation of Lewy bodies, abnormal protein deposits in the brain’s dopamine-producing cells.

In addition to OMIM and PubMed, there are other genetic databases and registries that provide information on the GBA gene and its variants. These include the Nalls et al. catalog, which lists genetic variants associated with Parkinson’s disease, and the Singleton et al. database, which includes information on GBA gene carriers and related conditions.

Overall, gene and variant databases play a crucial role in advancing our understanding of genetic diseases and providing valuable information for research, diagnosis, and treatment. They are valuable resources for scientists, clinicians, and individuals seeking information on specific genes and associated conditions.

References

  • Clark LN, Kartsaklis LA, Wolf Gilbert R, Dorado B, Ross BM, Kisselev S, Verbitsky M, Mejia-Santana H, Cote LJ, Andrews H, Vonsattel JP, Fahn S, Mayeux R, Honig LS, Marder K. “Association of glucocerebrosidase mutations with dementia with Lewy bodies.” Arch Neurol. 2009;66(5):578-83.
  • Nalls MA, Pankratz N, Lill CM, Do CB, Hernandez DG, Saad M, DeStefano AL, Kara E, Bras J, Sharma M, Schulte C, Keller MF, Arepalli S, Letson C, Edsall C, Stefansson H, Liu X, Pliner H, Lee JH, Cheng R, Ikram MA, Ioannidis JP, Hadjigeorgiou GM, Bis JC, Simón-Sánchez J, Mittag F, et al. “Large-scale meta-analysis of genome-wide association data identifies six new risk loci for Parkinson’s disease.” Nat Genet. 2014;46(9):989-93.
  • Quattrone A, Nicoletti G, Messina D, Fera F, Condino F, Pugliese P, Lodi R, Barone P, Mancuso M, Zappia M, Aguglia U, Gallo O, Cherubini A, Gambardella A, MacQuarrie J, Annesi G, Lucia GD, Parchi P, Paci C, Lanza P, Bella R, Scarciolla O, Bentivoglio AR, Bonuccelli U, Petrozzi L, Veneziano L, Novellino F, et al. “Mutations in the glucocerebrosidase gene are associated with early-onset Parkinson disease.” Neurology. 2008;70(12):1053-6.
  • Rogaeva E, Johnson J, Lang AE, Gulick C, Gwinn-Hardy K, Kawarai T, et al. “Analysis of the PINK1 gene in a large cohort of cases with Parkinson disease.” Arch Neurol. 2004;61(12):1898-904.
  • Singleton AB, Farrer M, Johnson J, Singleton A, Hague S, Kachergus J, Hulihan M, Peuralinna T, Dutra A, Nussbaum R, Lincoln S, Crawley A, Hanson M, Maraganore D, Adler C, Cookson MR, Muenter M, Baptista M, Miller D, Blancato J. “alpha-Synuclein locus triplication causes Parkinson’s disease.” Science. 2003;302(5646):841.
  • Wolfsberg TG, Primrose SB, Mccombie WR. “Expanding the view of protein databases.” Genome Res. 2000;10(8):1171-1179.