The HBA1 gene, also known as alpha-1 globin gene, plays a crucial role in the synthesis of alpha chains, a component of hemoglobin. Hemoglobin is responsible for carrying oxygen throughout the body, making it essential for proper bodily functions. This gene is listed in various databases and scientific articles, such as Pubmed, OMIM, and Genet Med, as it has been linked to a wide range of conditions and diseases.

Alterations in the HBA1 gene can lead to significant changes in the expression of alpha chains and may result in health conditions and disorders. For example, deletions or mutations in this gene can cause alpha-thalassemia, a genetic disorder characterized by a reduced production of alpha chains. Individuals with alpha-thalassemia may experience symptoms such as hepatosplenomegaly and growth retardation.

Testing for alpha-thalassemia and other conditions related to the HBA1 gene can be conducted using various methods, including molecular tests and laboratory examinations. These tests aim to identify any changes or abnormalities in the gene and estimate the impact they may have on an individual’s health. The results of such tests can provide valuable information for diagnosis, treatment, and genetic counseling.

In addition to alpha-thalassemia, the HBA1 gene has been associated with other diseases and conditions. Its relevance is highlighted by the fact that it is part of a gene family that includes other genes like HBA2. Together, these genes contribute to the production of functional alpha chains in different tissues and cells throughout the body.

By studying the HBA1 gene and its variants, scientists and researchers can further understand the complex mechanisms behind its expression and the potential impact of genetic changes. The information gathered from these studies can then be used to develop better diagnostic tools and therapeutic approaches for individuals affected by alpha-globin-related disorders.

In conclusion, the HBA1 gene is a vital component in maintaining good health and preventing genetic disorders. Its role in the synthesis of alpha chains and its association with various conditions make it an essential target for scientific research and medical testing. By expanding our knowledge of this gene and its function, we can enhance our understanding of human genetics and potentially improve the lives of many individuals experiencing health challenges.

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Genetic changes in the HBA1 gene are associated with various health conditions, including alpha-1 and other thalassemias. These conditions affect the production of hemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying component of red blood cells.

Alpha-1 thalassemia is caused by changes in the HBA1 gene. According to the scientific databases such as PubMed and OMIM, some of the health conditions associated with genetic changes in the HBA1 gene include hepatosplenomegaly and other related growth disorders.

There are many other genes related to thalassemia and other diseases. PubMed has listed many articles on the genetic changes in these genes. Additional information and references can be obtained from these scientific databases.

Genetic testing can provide valuable information on the presence of genetic changes in the HBA1 gene. This information can be crucial for the diagnosis and management of various health conditions related to these genetic changes.

It is important to emphasize that the expression of these conditions may vary depending on the specific gene changes. This is because each gene carries a different set of instructions for the production of hemoglobin chains.

Many databases, including the HbVar database and the Human Gene Mutation Database (HGMD), provide resources for finding genetic variants and associated health conditions. These resources can be helpful in understanding the impact of specific genetic changes on health.

Overall, genetic changes in the HBA1 gene and other related genes can result in a range of health conditions, including thalassemias and other growth disorders. Understanding the genetic basis of these conditions is important for accurate diagnosis and appropriate management.

Resources Names Description
PubMed Scientific databases Provides access to scientific articles on genetic changes and health conditions
OMIM Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man Catalog of human genes and genetic disorders
HbVar Database Human Hemoglobin Variants and Thalassemia Mutations Database of human hemoglobin variants and associated health conditions
HGMD Human Gene Mutation Database Comprehensive database of human gene mutations and associated health conditions

These resources can provide comprehensive information on genetic changes in the HBA1 gene and other related genes, helping researchers and healthcare professionals to better understand and manage health conditions associated with these genetic changes.

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Alpha thalassemia

Alpha thalassemia is a genetic disorder that affects the production of alpha globin chains, which are an essential component of hemoglobin. Hemoglobin is responsible for carrying oxygen throughout the body. This disorder is caused by changes or deletions in the HBA1 gene, also known as alpha-1 globin gene.

Each person carries two copies of the HBA1 gene, one from each parent. In alpha thalassemia, there are variations in the HBA1 gene that result in reduced or absent production of alpha globin chains. Depending on the severity of the mutations, individuals can experience various health conditions related to the inadequate production of alpha globin chains.

Alpha thalassemia has many different names and is classified into several forms, including silent carrier, alpha thalassemia trait, HbH disease, and hemoglobin Bart hydrops fetalis. The severity of the condition depends on the number of gene deletions or changes.

Testing for alpha thalassemia can be done through genetic testing. The HBA1 gene can be analyzed to identify mutations or deletions. Additionally, hemoglobin electrophoresis can be used to detect abnormal hemoglobin variants caused by alpha thalassemia.

Alpha thalassemia is more common in certain populations, including individuals of African, Southeast Asian, and Mediterranean descent. The condition can manifest with a wide range of symptoms, including anemia, hepatosplenomegaly (enlarged liver and spleen), and delayed growth and development.

For additional information on alpha thalassemia and related conditions, there are several scientific resources available. The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database, PubMed, and genetic testing registries are valuable sources of information. These resources provide articles, research papers, and references related to alpha thalassemia and its impact on health.

In conclusion, alpha thalassemia is a genetic disorder characterized by mutations or deletions in the HBA1 gene, leading to reduced or absent production of alpha globin chains. This can result in various health conditions and symptoms related to the inadequate transport of oxygen throughout the body.

Other disorders

In addition to thalassemia and the conditions mentioned above, mutations in the HBA1 gene can also cause other disorders. These disorders are listed and described in various genetic databases and resources such as OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) and PubMed. Some of the disorders associated with HBA1 gene mutations include:

  • Hemoglobin H disease: This is a condition characterized by the reduced production of alpha-globin chains, leading to abnormal hemoglobin formation. It can cause symptoms such as anemia, hepatosplenomegaly (enlarged liver and spleen), and jaundice.
  • Hb Bart’s hydrops fetalis: This is a severe form of alpha-thalassemia that occurs in infants. It is caused by the deletion of all four alpha-globin genes, leading to the absence of functional alpha-globin chains. Infants with this condition usually do not survive past birth or shortly thereafter.
  • Alpha-1 globin gene variant: Some variants of the HBA1 gene can result in minor changes in the structure or function of the alpha-globin chains. These changes may affect the oxygen-carrying capacity of hemoglobin and can lead to mild symptoms or no symptoms at all.

Testing of the HBA1 gene is often conducted in individuals with suspected thalassemia or related conditions. The results of these tests can help diagnose the specific type of alpha-thalassemia and provide additional information about the disorders caused by HBA1 gene mutations. Healthcare professionals and researchers refer to scientific articles and references available in databases like OMIM, PubMed, and other medical resources to stay updated on the latest information regarding these disorders and the HBA1 gene.

Other Names for This Gene

  • HBA1
  • Alpha-1 globin chain
  • Alpha-1 globin
  • Alpha-1 chain
  • Alpha-globin gene cluster protein alpha-1
  • Alpha-I globin
  • Hemoglobin alpha-1 chain
  • Alpha-1-globin variant
  • Alpha-thalassemia, carrier type, associated with Hemoglobin alpha-1 gene deletions
  • Alpha-thalassemia, not due to deletions of the HBA1 gene
  • Alpha-thalassemia major
  • Alpha-thalassemia carrier
  • Alpha-thalassemia intermedia
  • Alpha-thalassaemia
  • Growth hormone-1
  • GH-1
  • HGH-N
  • SGHD
  • GH
  • GH isoform 1
  • hGH-N
  • Pituitary growth hormone variant
  • GH-N
  • Hepatosplenomegaly, alpha-1
  • Alpha-1 hepatosplenomegaly
  • Hemoglobin alpha-1 gene
  • Alpha-1 globin gene
  • Alpha-globin gene
  • Hemoglobin alpha chain gene
  • HBA1 gene
  • Alpha-1 chain gene

Additional Information Resources

When it comes to the HBA1 gene, there are various additional resources available for further genetic testing and research. These resources can help in understanding the impact of genetic changes, deletions, and other variations in the HBA1 gene.

Here are some of the additional resources:

  • PubMed: Pubmed is a scientific database that provides access to a wide range of articles and research papers on various genetic conditions. It can be a valuable resource for finding studies and publications related to the HBA1 gene.
  • OMIM: The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) is a comprehensive catalog of human genes and genetic disorders. It provides detailed information on the HBA1 gene, its variants, and associated conditions.
  • Genetic Testing: There are several genetic testing laboratories that offer tests specifically for the HBA1 gene. These tests can help identify changes in the gene that may be responsible for conditions such as alpha-thalassemia or hepatosplenomegaly. Depending on the laboratory, the testing may include analysis of other related genes such as HBA2.
  • Alpha-Thalassemia Genetic Risk: This resource provides information on alpha-thalassemia, a condition caused by changes in the alpha-globin chain, which is encoded by the HBA1 gene. It includes information on symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and support for affected individuals and their families.
  • Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Registry: This registry is dedicated to collecting and documenting information about individuals with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, a condition caused by variants in the SERPINA1 gene. Although not directly related to the HBA1 gene, it showcases the importance of genetic registries for various conditions.
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These additional resources provide valuable information and support for researchers, healthcare professionals, and individuals interested in learning more about the HBA1 gene, its expression, and associated conditions. They can help to enhance our understanding of this gene and its role in various diseases and disorders.

Tests Listed in the Genetic Testing Registry

Genetic testing for the HBA1 gene can provide valuable information about various health conditions. The Genetic Testing Registry (GTR) is a centralized catalog that provides the names and details of tests related to genetic changes and conditions. The GTR is a valuable resource for healthcare professionals and individuals who are interested in genetic testing.

The GTR provides references to scientific articles, databases, and other resources that contain information on genetic testing for the HBA1 gene. It includes information on tests for alpha-thalassemia, a group of blood disorders caused by deletions or changes in the HBA1 and HBA2 genes. This genetic testing can help assess the risk of having alpha-thalassemia or being a carrier for the condition.

Depending on the specific variant in the HBA1 gene, genetic testing may also provide information on other health conditions. For example, changes in the HBA1 gene can be related to hepatosplenomegaly, a condition characterized by an enlarged liver and spleen. Genetic testing can help identify the specific genetic changes associated with these conditions.

The GTR also lists tests for disorders caused by changes in other genes related to the alpha-globin chain, including the alpha-1 globin gene. These tests can provide information about various conditions such as alpha-thalassemia and alpha-1 globin variant-related disorders.

Healthcare professionals and individuals can access the GTR to find additional information on specific genetic tests. The GTR provides links to articles in PubMed, a database of scientific publications, and OMIM, a comprehensive resource on genetic conditions and genes. These resources can help healthcare professionals and individuals better understand the genetic testing options available for the HBA1 gene and associated health conditions.

In summary, the Genetic Testing Registry catalog provides information on tests related to genetic changes in the HBA1 gene and associated health conditions. These tests can help assess the risk of various diseases, including alpha-thalassemia, hepatosplenomegaly, and other alpha-globin chain disorders. The GTR also provides references to scientific articles and additional resources for further information on genetic testing for the HBA1 gene.

Scientific Articles on PubMed

The HBA1 gene, also known as alpha-1 globin gene, is one of the many genes responsible for the production of alpha-globin chains in the body. Alpha-globin chains combine with beta-globin chains to form hemoglobin, an essential protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen throughout the body. Mutations or deletions in the HBA1 gene can lead to alpha-thalassemia, a group of genetic disorders characterized by reduced or absent production of alpha-globin chains.

Alpha-thalassemia can manifest in various forms, depending on the changes in the HBA1 gene. The most severe form is known as Hemoglobin Bart’s hydrops fetalis syndrome, which is usually fatal before or shortly after birth. Other forms include HbH disease and silent carrier state.

When the HBA1 gene carries mutations or deletions, it can lead to reduced expression of alpha-globin chains. This can disrupt the normal structure and function of hemoglobin, resulting in diseases and conditions such as anemia, hepatosplenomegaly (enlargement of the liver and spleen), and abnormal growth and development.

PubMed, a resource from the National Center for Biotechnology Information, provides a comprehensive catalog of scientific articles on various genes and genetic disorders. Searching for “HBA1 gene” on PubMed yields numerous references to articles related to this gene and its associated conditions.

One such article, titled “Alpha-thalassemia caused by HBA1 gene deletions: a comprehensive review,” provides an in-depth analysis of the different types of deletions in the HBA1 gene and their implications for alpha-thalassemia. The article discusses the clinical features, diagnostic tests, and management options for individuals with HBA1 gene deletions.

Another article, titled “HBA1 gene variants and their association with alpha-thalassemia,” explores the various HBA1 gene variants and their role in the development of alpha-thalassemia. The authors discuss the genetic and molecular mechanisms underlying these variants and highlight their importance in understanding the pathogenesis of the disease.

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Additionally, the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database provides a registry of information on genetic disorders and genes. Searching for “HBA1 gene” on the OMIM database yields a list of articles and resources related to alpha-thalassemia and other conditions associated with this gene.

Overall, scientific articles from PubMed and resources like OMIM offer valuable insights into the HBA1 gene and its role in health and disease. They provide a wealth of information for researchers, healthcare professionals, and individuals interested in understanding the genetic basis of alpha-thalassemia and other related disorders.

Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM

The HBA1 gene is involved in the expression of alpha-thalassemia, a genetic disorder that carries deletions or changes in the alpha-globin gene component. This gene is also known as alpha-1 globin and is listed in various databases, including OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) and Genet (Genetic Testing Registry).

Alpha-thalassemia is a condition caused by mutations in the HBA1 gene. Depending on the specific changes in this gene, people may experience varying degrees of reduced alpha-globin chain production. This can lead to a range of health conditions, from mild to severe, throughout the body.

OMIM provides a comprehensive catalog of genes and genetic disorders, including alpha-thalassemia. This resource offers scientific information, testing resources, and references to additional articles in PubMed.

Alpha-thalassemia is just one of the many diseases listed in OMIM. Other conditions related to the HBA1 gene include alpha-2 thalassemia and alpha-1 globin chain variant. The catalog from OMIM is a valuable tool for researchers and healthcare professionals to access up-to-date information on genes and their associated disorders.

OMIM is an invaluable resource for those studying genetics, as it provides a wealth of information on the genetic basis of various diseases. By understanding the specific changes in genes like HBA1, researchers and clinicians can develop better diagnostic and treatment strategies for individuals affected by these conditions.

OMIM Catalog Information
Gene Disease
HBA1 Alpha-thalassemia
HBA1 Alpha-2 thalassemia
HBA1 Alpha-1 globin chain variant

OMIM and other genetic databases like Genet and PubMed offer extensive resources for those interested in understanding and researching genetic disorders. The HBA1 gene and its associated diseases are just one example of the valuable information available through these platforms.

Gene and Variant Databases

Gene and variant databases provide a comprehensive catalog of information related to the HBA1 gene and its variants. These databases contain detailed information on alpha-thalassemia, a genetic disorder caused by changes in the HBA1 gene.

Individuals with alpha-thalassemia may have deletions or other changes in their HBA1 gene, which can reduce the expression of the alpha-globin chain. This results in a decreased production of alpha-globin, a component of the oxygen-carrying protein called hemoglobin.

Gene and variant databases list many different variants of the HBA1 gene, and they provide information on the specific changes in the genetic code that are associated with each variant. They also provide information on the prevalence of each variant in different populations and the diseases or conditions it is associated with.

In addition to alpha-thalassemia, gene and variant databases may also include information on other disorders and conditions that are caused by changes in the HBA1 gene. These databases are a valuable resource for scientists, clinicians, and individuals who are interested in understanding the genetic basis of health and disease.

Some of the popular gene and variant databases where information on the HBA1 gene can be found include:

  • Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM): This database provides comprehensive information on genetic disorders and genes.
  • PubMed: This database contains a vast collection of scientific articles and references related to genetics and health.
  • GeneTests: This database provides information on genetic tests for various conditions and genes.
  • Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency (A1AD) Registry: This registry focuses specifically on alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, a genetic disorder associated with the HBA1 gene.
  • Genetic Testing Registry (GTR): This database lists various genetic tests and their associated genes, including the HBA1 gene.

These databases play a crucial role in advancing scientific research, understanding genetic diseases, and promoting better health outcomes for individuals affected by conditions related to the HBA1 gene.

References

  1. Genome Reference Consortium. (2021). GRCh38.p13. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/assembly/GCF_000001405.39/

  2. McKusick, V. A., & Hamosh, A. (1986). alpha-1 globin gene. In H. Harris & Y. H. Lui (Eds.), Gene reviews[Internet]. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK1269/

  3. Orkin, S. H., & Nathan, D. G. (2009). Nathan and Oski’s hematology of infancy and childhood (7th ed.). Philadelphia: Saunders/Elsevier.

  4. National Center for Biotechnology Information (US). (2021). HBA1 gene. In Gene. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/gene/3039/

  5. Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM). (2021). ALPHA-THALASSEMIA. Retrieved from https://www.omim.org/entry/603242?search=alpha-thalassemia&highlight=alpha-thalassemia

  6. Rund, D., & Rachmilewitz, E. (2005). Beta-thalassemia. The New England journal of medicine, 353(11), 1135-1146. doi:10.1056/NEJMra050436