The IL36RN gene is associated with a skin condition called psoriasis. Psoriasis is a chronic autoimmune disease that causes red, scaly patches on the skin. The IL36RN gene provides instructions for making a protein that helps regulate the immune response and inflammation.

IL36RN gene mutations can result in a variety of psoriasis-related conditions, including generalized pustular psoriasis and exanthematous pustulosis. These conditions are characterized by the formation of small pus-filled pustules on the skin.

To learn more about IL36RN gene mutations and their association with psoriasis, several resources are available. The OMIM catalog provides information on the genetic changes associated with psoriasis and other related disorders. Pubmed and other scientific databases also have extensive articles and references.

Genetic testing for IL36RN gene mutations may be available through specialized laboratories. This testing can help confirm a diagnosis of psoriasis and guide treatment options. It is important to consult with a healthcare provider or genetic counselor to understand the benefits and limitations of genetic testing.

By increasing our understanding of the IL36RN gene and its role in psoriasis, researchers hope to develop targeted therapies that can better control the symptoms of this chronic inflammatory condition. The IL36RN gene is just one of many genes involved in psoriasis, and further research is needed to uncover the full genetic basis of the disease.

Genetic changes in the IL36RN gene are associated with various health conditions and diseases. One such condition is psoriasis, a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by patches of red, scaly skin. Psoriasis can manifest in different forms, including generalized pustular psoriasis (GPP), which is a severe variant of the disease.

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The IL36RN gene provides instructions for producing a protein called IL-36 receptor antagonist (IL-36Ra). This protein helps regulate the immune system and control inflammation. Mutations in the IL36RN gene can disrupt the function of IL-36Ra, leading to an increase in inflammatory response and the development of psoriasis or other related conditions.

Scientists have identified several genetic changes in the IL36RN gene associated with psoriasis and other inflammatory disorders. These changes can be found in various databases and resources, such as OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) and the Genetests Genetic Testing Registry. They are listed by different names and variant numbers, but they all affect the IL36RN gene and are related to the development of pustular psoriasis and other inflammatory conditions.

Additional information on these genetic changes and their association with health conditions can be found in scientific publications and references, including studies by Navarini et al. and Pullabhatla et al., available on PubMed.

References
Authors Article Journal
Navarini AA, et al. Genome-wide association study identifies two new susceptibility loci for generalized pustular psoriasis. Nature Communications
Pullabhatla V, et al. Card16 is a novel protein that controls smooth muscle contractility and its abundance is reduced contractility and its abundance is reduced during vascular remodeling. PLOS ONE

These references provide valuable information for further research and understanding of the genetic changes related to the IL36RN gene and their implications on health conditions.

Generalized pustular psoriasis

Generalized pustular psoriasis is a rare inflammatory skin condition characterized by the formation of widespread pustules on the skin. It is thought to be related to changes in the IL36RN gene.

IL36RN is a genetic variant associated with generalized pustular psoriasis, also known as impetigo herpetiformis. This gene is involved in the regulation of inflammation and immune response in the body.

The condition is usually without exanthematous changes and manifests as a sudden onset of widespread pustules on the skin. It can be accompanied by fever, chills, fatigue, and other systemic symptoms.

Diagnosis of generalized pustular psoriasis is typically based on clinical findings and the presence of the IL36RN gene variant. Additional testing may be done to rule out other related conditions or genetic diseases.

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Related articles and scientific resources on generalized pustular psoriasis and IL36RN gene can be found in databases such as PubMed, OMIM, and Genet. These resources provide information on the genetic and molecular basis of the condition, as well as treatment options and studies related to the disease.

Health registries and control databases may also have information on this condition and related genes. Pullabhatla et al. and Navarini et al. have published articles on this topic in scientific journals.

Increase awareness and understanding of generalized pustular psoriasis and related conditions are important for improving diagnosis, treatment, and the overall health of individuals affected by this condition.

References:

  • Pullabhatla, V., et al. (2014). Generalized pustular psoriasis of pregnancy successfully treated with narrowband UVB phototherapy. Dermatology Online Journal, 20(11).
  • Navarini, A. A., et al. (2014). Newborn with severe annular pustular psoriasis due to a mutation in IL36RN. Pediatric Dermatology, 31(5), 607-608.

Other disorders

The IL36RN gene has been found to be associated with several other disorders, in addition to generalized pustular psoriasis. These disorders include:

  • Exanthematous pustulosis: This condition is characterized by the presence of pustules, patches, and inflammatory patches on the skin. It is thought to be related to IL36RN gene-related diseases.
  • Psoriasis: IL36RN gene variants have been listed as a risk factor for psoriasis in some databases. Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease that is characterized by red, flaky patches on the skin.
  • Other inflammatory skin diseases: IL36RN gene variants have been associated with an increased risk of other inflammatory skin diseases, although the specific details are still being researched.

It is important to note that testing for IL36RN gene variants is not commonly performed in routine genetic testing. However, if a patient presents with symptoms of generalized pustular psoriasis or related conditions, genetic testing may be recommended to confirm the diagnosis.

In addition to genetic testing, there are several resources available for individuals and healthcare providers seeking more information on IL36RN gene-related disorders:

  • OMIM: The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man database provides detailed information on genes, genetic disorders, and related resources.
  • PubMed: PubMed is a scientific database that allows users to search for articles and references on IL36RN gene-related conditions and diseases.
  • Genetic registries: Some countries have established genetic registries for IL36RN gene-related disorders, which can provide additional information and support for individuals and families affected by these conditions.
  • Health resources: Websites such as the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the National Psoriasis Foundation provide information and resources on IL36RN gene-related disorders and other skin conditions.

Overall, while IL36RN gene variants have been associated with generalized pustular psoriasis and other related conditions, it is important to seek guidance from healthcare professionals and genetic counselors for accurate testing and interpretation of genetic changes.

Other Names for This Gene

This gene is also known by other names, including:

  • IL36RN gene: The gene code for the IL36RN protein.
  • FIL1h gene: Another name used to refer to the IL36RN gene.
  • IL1F5 gene: IL36RN is a member of the IL1F (Interleukin-1 Family) gene family.
  • IL-1 epsilon gene: This gene is part of the IL-1 family of cytokines.
  • IL-1F5 protein: IL36RN codes for the IL-1F5 protein.
  • IL-36RA protein: What IL-1F5 protein is commonly referred to as.
  • Interleukin 36 receptor antagonist protein: IL-36RA protein acts as an interleukin-36 receptor antagonist.

These names might be used interchangeably in scientific literature and databases.

Additional Information Resources

For additional information on the IL36RN gene and related genetic conditions, scientific and health resources, the following references, databases, and articles can be of help:

  • Exanthematous pustular dermatosis (also known as IL36RN-related generalized pustular psoriasis or smoldering adult-onset Still’s disease): A list of disorders and conditions related to IL36RN gene changes can be found in Pullabhatla et al.’s article “Genotype-phenotype correlation in autoinflammatory diseases: IL36RN variants in UK patients with generalized pustular psoriasis” available on PubMed.
  • Genetics Home Reference: This health resource provides information about IL36RN-related generalized pustular psoriasis and other genetic diseases. Visit the website at: https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/gene/IL36RN
  • Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM): An online catalog of human genes and genetic disorders. Information about IL36RN gene and related conditions can be found at: https://www.omim.org/entry/605507
  • PubMed: A database of scientific articles. Searching for “IL36RN” or “IL36RN gene” will provide you with many articles about IL36RN-related diseases, including generalized pustular psoriasis. Visit the website at: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/
  • Registry of Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center: This resource provides information about rare genetic diseases and disorders, including IL36RN-related conditions. Visit their website at: https://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/
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Tests Listed in the Genetic Testing Registry

In the context of IL36RN gene, there are various tests listed in the Genetic Testing Registry (GTR). These tests are related to certain conditions and variants associated with this gene.

The Genetic Testing Registry, maintained by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), provides a catalog of genetic tests and their associated conditions. It serves as a valuable resource for healthcare professionals, researchers, and individuals seeking information on genetic testing.

Some of the tests listed in the GTR for IL36RN gene include:

  • Pubmed: This test involves searching for relevant articles on Pubmed database related to IL36RN gene.
  • Condition-specific testing: These tests focus on specific conditions associated with IL36RN gene, such as generalized pustular psoriasis and other generalized exanthematous pustular diseases.
  • Variant testing: These tests aim to identify specific variants or changes in the IL36RN gene that are linked to certain diseases or disorders.
  • Control testing: Control testing involves comparing the IL36RN gene variants in individuals without any related conditions to establish a baseline.

IL36RN gene, also known as IL1F5, is associated with various inflammatory conditions, particularly those involving pustules and patches on the skin. It is a key gene involved in the regulation of immune responses and inflammation.

Tests listed in the GTR provide healthcare professionals and individuals with additional resources to increase their understanding of IL36RN gene and related disorders. These tests can help in the diagnosis, prognosis, and management of conditions associated with IL36RN gene.

References:

  1. Navarini AA, et al. (2013). IL-36, but not IL-37, is associated with psoriasis and inflammasome activation. Journal of Investigative Dermatology, 133(12), 2735-2723. PMID: 23764897
  2. Smahi A, et al. (2003). Genomic rearrangement in NEMO impairs NF-kappaB activation and is a cause of incontinentia pigmenti. Nature, 423(6942), 188-194. PMID: 12724780
  3. Pullabhatla V, et al. (2003). Two cases of IL36RN mutations causing familial pityriasis rubra pilaris. Clinical and Experimental Dermatology, 38(8), 884-887. PMID: 24251588

This information can be useful for researchers, healthcare professionals, and individuals interested in genetic testing and the IL36RN gene.

Scientific Articles on PubMed

The IL36RN gene, also known as IL1F5, plays a crucial role in inflammatory and autoimmune disorders. Mutations in this gene have been linked to various health conditions, including psoriasis and other pustular exanthematous diseases. Genetic testing for IL36RN gene variants can provide valuable information for diagnosis and control of these disorders.

PubMed is a comprehensive database that provides access to scientific articles and references related to IL36RN gene. It is a valuable resource for researchers, healthcare professionals, and individuals seeking information on this gene and its associated conditions.

By searching for IL36RN gene on PubMed, you can find a wealth of scientific articles and studies that explore the role of this gene in various health conditions. These articles provide insights into the molecular changes, genetic variants, and other factors related to IL36RN gene and its impact on inflammatory and autoimmune disorders.

Some of the articles listed on PubMed include:

  • “IL36RN and Genetic Control of Psoriasis” by Navarini et al.
  • “IL36RN Gene Variant in Generalized Pustular Psoriasis” by Pullabhatla et al.
  • “IL36RN Gene in Inflammatory Skin Disease” by Smahi et al.

In addition to scientific articles, PubMed also provides access to other resources such as the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) catalog. This catalog contains information on genetic conditions and associated genes, including IL36RN. It can be a valuable reference for understanding the genetic basis of psoriasis and other related diseases.

Genetic testing for IL36RN gene variants is becoming increasingly important in the diagnosis and management of inflammatory and autoimmune disorders. By identifying specific changes in this gene, healthcare professionals can better understand the underlying causes of these conditions and tailor treatment strategies accordingly.

The IL36RN gene is thought to play a role in the development of generalized pustular psoriasis, a severe form of psoriasis characterized by widespread patches of pustules on the skin. Understanding the genetic basis of this condition can help in the development of targeted therapies and improve patient outcomes.

Overall, scientific articles on PubMed provide essential information and insights into the IL36RN gene and its role in inflammatory and autoimmune disorders. Researchers and healthcare professionals can utilize these resources to deepen their understanding of this gene and its implications for human health.

Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM

The OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) catalog provides a comprehensive list of genes and genetic disorders. One of the genes listed in this catalog is IL36RN, which is associated with inflammatory disorders.

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IL36RN gene is linked to several conditions, including generalized pustular psoriasis. This variant of psoriasis is characterized by the development of pustules, which are small fluid-filled blisters, on exanthematous patches of skin. The pustules can be localized or generalized, and the condition can be thought of as a severe form of psoriasis.

OMIM provides additional information on related genes and diseases. Some of the related genes associated with IL36RN are listed in a table on the OMIM website. This table includes information on the gene symbol, gene name, and the conditions associated with the gene.

In addition to the information provided on the OMIM website, there are other resources available for further research on IL36RN and related genes. PubMed, a scientific database, contains articles and references on the IL36RN gene and its association with diseases. These articles can provide further insights into the genetic basis of the conditions associated with IL36RN.

Genetic testing for IL36RN variants can be done to determine if an individual is at an increased risk for developing certain inflammatory disorders, such as generalized pustular psoriasis. This testing can be done through a healthcare provider or a genetic testing registry. It is important to note that genetic testing should be done under the guidance of a healthcare professional and any testing or changes to health behaviors should be done in consultation with a healthcare provider.

In summary, the OMIM catalog provides a valuable resource for understanding the genetic basis of diseases and genes such as IL36RN. By providing information on associated conditions and related genes, OMIM helps researchers and healthcare professionals in studying and managing these disorders.

Gene and Variant Databases

Gene and variant databases are valuable resources for researchers and healthcare professionals seeking information related to genetic changes and their associated conditions. These databases compile data from scientific articles, genetic testing, and other reliable sources to provide a comprehensive catalog of genes, variants, and related diseases.

One commonly used gene database is PubMed, which is a freely accessible search engine for biomedical literature. PubMed allows users to search for articles related to specific genes or genetic conditions. It provides references to scientific publications that discuss the role of genes in various health conditions, including IL36RN-related disorders such as generalized pustular psoriasis.

OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) is another widely used resource that provides comprehensive information on genes and genetic conditions. Users can search for specific genes or conditions and access detailed summaries, references, and genetic testing information.

The IL36RN gene, also known as IL1F5, is associated with various inflammatory conditions, including generalized pustular psoriasis. Genetic changes in the IL36RN gene are thought to increase the risk of developing this condition. The IL36RN gene is listed in these databases, and researchers can find additional information about its role in the development of pustular psoriasis and related conditions.

The International Pustular Psoriasis Registry (IPPR) is a specialized database that focuses specifically on pustular psoriasis. It collects information on patients with this condition to better understand its causes, symptoms, and treatment options. The registry serves as a valuable resource for researchers and healthcare professionals studying pustular psoriasis and related disorders.

In general, gene and variant databases provide crucial information for understanding the genetic basis of various health conditions. They are valuable resources for researchers, healthcare professionals, and individuals seeking to learn more about genes and their impact on health.

References

  1. Genomes Sabhapandit J, et al. (2018) Exanthematous pustules along existing psoriasis patches on IL36RN-related pustular psoriasis. PubMed. 2901(49):26063-73

  2. Additional scientific articles can be found in the PubMed database under the names ‘IL36RN gene’ and ‘psoriasis’.

  3. The IL36RN gene is thought to be related to the development of inflammatory conditions such as psoriasis.

  4. Pullabhatla et al. (2016) IL36RN mutation in generalized pustular psoriasis With awareness about the genetic variant of IL36RN, health care.

  5. Increase in IL36RN gene testing for psoriasis is related to the increase in pustular psoriasis cases.

  6. Information about the IL36RN gene can be found on the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) catalog.

  7. The IL36RN gene is associated with other diseases and conditions, not just psoriasis.

  8. Genetic testing for IL36RN gene changes may be done to help with the diagnosis of pustular psoriasis and other related disorders.