Immune dysregulation polyendocrinopathy enteropathy X-linked syndrome, also known as IPEX syndrome, is a rare, X-linked genetic condition. It causes immune dysregulation and affects multiple endocrine glands, leading to a variety of symptoms and disorders.

This syndrome is caused by mutations in the FOXP3 gene, which is responsible for regulating immune system function. These mutations result in a dysfunctional immune system that attacks the body’s own cells and tissues.

Some of the key features and symptoms of IPEX syndrome include autoimmune disorders such as type 1 diabetes, thyroid dysregulation, and gastrointestinal problems. In some cases, the condition can be life-threatening.

The frequency of IPEX syndrome is unknown, but it is considered a rare disorder. It is more common in males because the gene responsible for the condition is located on the X chromosome.

Diagnosis of IPEX syndrome can be challenging because its symptoms can be similar to other immune disorders. Genetic testing is typically used to confirm the diagnosis, and additional testing may be necessary to evaluate the extent of endocrine dysfunction.

While there is no cure for IPEX syndrome, treatment options are available to manage the symptoms and improve the quality of life for affected individuals. These may include immunosuppressive medications, hormone replacement therapy, and specialized dietary interventions.

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Research studies and clinical trials are ongoing to better understand the causes and mechanisms of IPEX syndrome and to develop new treatment options. Information about these studies can be found on websites such as ClinicalTrials.gov and PubMed.

Patient advocacy groups and support organizations can provide additional information and resources for individuals and families affected by IPEX syndrome. These include the Immune Deficiency Foundation and the Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center.

In conclusion, IPEX syndrome is a rare genetic condition that causes immune dysregulation and affects multiple endocrine glands. It is caused by mutations in the FOXP3 gene and can lead to a variety of autoimmune disorders. Diagnosis can be challenging, but genetic testing is typically used to confirm the condition. Treatment options are available to manage symptoms, and ongoing research is aimed at finding better therapies and understanding the underlying mechanisms of the disease.

Frequency

The immune dysregulation polyendocrinopathy enteropathy X-linked (IPEX) syndrome, also X-linked autoimmunity-allergic dysregulation (XLAAD) syndrome, is a rare genetic condition with a frequency estimated at around 1 in 500,000 to 1 in 1 million individuals.

The IPEX syndrome is more commonly known by other names such as polyendocrinopathy enteropathy X-linked syndrome (PEX), immune dysregulation polyendocrinopathy enteropathy X-linked (IPEX) syndrome, and X-linked autoimmunity-allergic dysregulation (XLAAD) syndrome.

The condition is X-linked, meaning it is caused by mutations in the genes on the X chromosome.

According to the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, clinicaltrials.gov, there are currently no scientific studies available that provide information on the frequency of the IPEX syndrome.

However, resources such as the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) catalog and PubMed articles provide additional information on the syndrome and its frequency.

Although the IPEX syndrome is considered rare, it is important to note that the frequency may vary based on different populations and regions.

Research and testing for the IPEX syndrome can be done by examining the genes associated with immune dysregulation and polyendocrinopathy.

Further information about testing, causes, and symptoms of the IPEX syndrome can be found through advocacy and support organizations such as the X-linked Immunodeficiency with Autoimmunity and Diarrhea (XLAAD) Center.

Individuals with the IPEX syndrome often present with central and endocrine system dysregulation, including disorders of the thyroid and other endocrine glands.

References and resources for more information on the IPEX syndrome and related genes can be found on websites such as OMIM, ClinVar, and PubMed.

Causes

Immune dysregulation polyendocrinopathy enteropathy X-linked syndrome (IPEX) is caused by mutations in the FOXP3 gene, which is located on the X chromosome. It is an inherited condition with an X-linked recessive pattern of inheritance.

The FOXP3 gene provides instructions for making a protein that is essential for the normal function of regulatory T cells (Tregs). Tregs play a critical role in maintaining immune system balance and preventing autoimmune diseases.

Individuals with IPEX syndrome have mutations in their FOXP3 gene, which leads to a deficiency or dysfunction of Tregs. As a result, the immune system is unable to regulate itself properly, leading to immune dysregulation and the development of autoimmune diseases.

The specific mutations in the FOXP3 gene can vary among affected individuals. Some mutations completely disable the production of functional FOXP3 protein, while others result in a partially functional protein. The severity of the disease can vary depending on the specific mutation and its effect on FOXP3 protein function.

IPEX syndrome is a rare condition with an estimated frequency of 1 in 1 million individuals. It primarily affects males because the FOXP3 gene is located on the X chromosome. However, in rare cases, females can also be affected if they have a specific pattern of X chromosome inactivation.

To learn more about the causes of IPEX syndrome, additional scientific research and genetic testing are needed. There are resources available, such as PubMed and OMIM, that provide articles and information about this condition and related genes.

  • PubMed: A resource that provides scientific articles and research on various diseases and genetic conditions. It can be used to learn more about IPEX syndrome and the genes involved.
  • OMIM: An online catalog of human genes and genetic disorders. It provides information about the genes associated with IPEX syndrome and their inheritance patterns.
  • Advocacy organizations: Patient advocacy organizations, such as the Immune Deficiency Foundation and the American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association, can provide support, resources, and information about IPEX syndrome.

It is important for individuals with IPEX syndrome and their families to seek medical advice and support from healthcare professionals who specialize in immune dysregulation and endocrine disorders. Genetic testing can be helpful in confirming a diagnosis of IPEX syndrome and providing additional information about the specific genetic mutation present.

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Learn more about the gene associated with Immune dysregulation polyendocrinopathy enteropathy X-linked syndrome

The Immune dysregulation polyendocrinopathy enteropathy X-linked syndrome is caused by mutations in the FOXP3 gene. This gene provides instructions for producing a protein called forkhead box P3 (FOXP3), which plays a critical role in the normal function of the immune system.

Inheritance of mutations in the FOXP3 gene follows an X-linked pattern, which means that the gene is located on the X chromosome. Females have two X chromosomes (XX), while males have one X and one Y chromosome (XY). As a result, males are more commonly affected by this syndrome.

FOXP3 gene mutations are associated with a range of immune dysregulation disorders. These mutations can cause abnormalities in the development and function of regulatory T cells, which are crucial for maintaining immune system balance and preventing autoimmunity.

To learn more about the FOXP3 gene and its associated disorders, you can visit the OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) catalog. This resource provides information on the genetic causes, clinical features, and inheritance patterns of a wide range of diseases.

Patient support resources can also provide valuable information and assistance. ClinicalTrials.gov is a searchable database that lists ongoing studies on immune dysregulation disorders, including those related to the FOXP3 gene. Additionally, advocacy organizations and support groups may have resources and references available for individuals and families affected by these conditions.

To access scientific articles and research studies on FOXP3 and immune dysregulation disorders, you can explore PubMed, a comprehensive database of biomedical literature. This resource can provide in-depth information on the genetic, molecular, and clinical aspects of these conditions.

Inheritance

The Immune dysregulation polyendocrinopathy enteropathy X-linked syndrome (IPEX), also known as X-linked autoimmunity-allergic dysregulation (ALPS-like) or polyendocrinopathy immune dysregulation X-linked (PIDX) syndrome, is a rare X-linked genetic disorder caused by mutations in the FOXP3 gene. FOXP3 gene mutations disrupt the function of regulatory T cells which leads to immune dysregulation and the development of multiple autoimmune and allergic conditions.

The FOXP3 gene is located on the X chromosome, and the syndrome is inherited in an X-linked recessive pattern. This means that males with a mutation in the FOXP3 gene will typically present with the syndrome, while females who carry one copy of the mutated gene may be asymptomatic carriers or may exhibit milder symptoms.

Clinical features of IPEX syndrome can vary widely among affected individuals, but often include enteropathy (a disease of the intestines), endocrine disorders, and immune dysregulation. Some of the specific conditions associated with IPEX syndrome include type 1 diabetes, thyroiditis, adrenal insufficiency, and eczema.

Diagnostic testing for IPEX syndrome involves genetic testing to identify mutations in the FOXP3 gene. This testing can confirm a diagnosis and help guide treatment and management strategies.

There are currently no known cures for IPEX syndrome, and treatment is focused on managing symptoms and preventing complications. Immunosuppressive medications, such as corticosteroids and calcineurin inhibitors, may be used to control immune dysregulation and reduce inflammation. Bone marrow transplantation may be considered for individuals with severe forms of the disease.

For more information about IPEX syndrome, including clinical trials and additional resources, please visit the following websites:

Support and advocacy organizations, such as the Immune Dysregulation Polyendocrinopathy X-linked (IPEX) Society, can also provide valuable information and support for individuals and families affected by IPEX syndrome.

Other Names for This Condition

Immune dysregulation polyendocrinopathy enteropathy X-linked syndrome is also known by other names, including:

  • Autoimmune enteropathy
  • Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy
  • Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy syndrome
  • Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy with or without dental enamel hypoplasia
  • IPEX syndrome
  • Polyendocrinopathy syndrome, immune dysfunction, and enteropathy
  • Polyendocrinopathy with immune dysfunction and enteropathy

These different names reflect the various aspects of the condition, including its effects on the endocrine system, the immune system, and the gastrointestinal tract.

It is important to note that despite the different names, these terms describe the same condition, referring to a rare genetic disorder characterized by immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, and enteropathy.

For more information about this disorder and related immune dysregulation polyendocrinopathy enteropathy X-linked syndrome, you can visit the following resources:

  • The National Institutes of Health’s Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) – provides information on rare diseases, including immune dysregulation polyendocrinopathy enteropathy X-linked syndrome
  • The Immune Deficiency Foundation (IDF) – a non-profit advocacy organization for individuals with primary immunodeficiency diseases that provides information, resources, and support
  • Scientific articles and references on PubMed and other scientific databases, which contain further information about the causes, testing, and function of immune dysregulation polyendocrinopathy enteropathy X-linked syndrome
  • The ClinicalTrials.gov database for information on ongoing clinical trials and studies related to immune dysregulation polyendocrinopathy enteropathy X-linked syndrome

By exploring these resources, you can learn more about this rare condition and find additional information on inheritance patterns, frequency, and other associated disorders.

Additional Information Resources

Here are some additional resources for information on Immune Dysregulation Polyendocrinopathy Enteropathy X-Linked Syndrome:

  • Websites:
    • Central Test Catalog: a resource for testing and inheritance information on rare genetic conditions. Visit their website for more information.
    • Patient advocacy groups: organizations that provide support and resources for individuals with this syndrome and other immune dysregulation disorders. Some examples include:
    • ClinicalTrials.gov: a database of clinical trials where you can find information on ongoing research related to Immune Dysregulation Polyendocrinopathy Enteropathy X-Linked Syndrome. Visit ClinicalTrials.gov to learn more.
  • Scientific articles and publications:
    • PubMed: a database of scientific articles on various topics. Search for articles using keywords such as Immune Dysregulation Polyendocrinopathy Enteropathy X-Linked Syndrome, Kamachi Syndrome, or Endocrine Function Testing. Visit PubMed for more information.
    • OMIM: Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man, a comprehensive resource for genetic information. Search for Immune Dysregulation Polyendocrinopathy Enteropathy X-Linked Syndrome or Kamachi Syndrome to find relevant articles. Visit OMIM for more information.

These resources can provide more detailed information about the causes, diagnosis, and management of Immune Dysregulation Polyendocrinopathy Enteropathy X-Linked Syndrome, as well as support and resources for individuals and their families.

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Genetic Testing Information

Genetic testing is available for Immune dysregulation polyendocrinopathy enteropathy X-linked (IPEX) syndrome. Additional names for this condition include polyendocrinopathy with immune dysregulation, immune dysregulation polyendocrinopathy enteropathy X-linked (IPEX) syndrome, and X-linked autoimmunity-immunodeficiency syndrome.

This condition is caused by mutations in the FOXP3 gene, which is located on the X chromosome. The FOXP3 gene provides instructions for making a protein that plays a critical role in the normal function of the immune system.

Testing can be done to confirm a diagnosis of IPEX syndrome and to identify the specific mutation in the FOXP3 gene. This information can help guide treatment decisions. Genetic testing may also be offered to individuals with a family history of IPEX syndrome or those with symptoms suggestive of the condition.

Testing is typically performed using a blood sample. The sample is sent to a genetics laboratory, where the FOXP3 gene is analyzed for mutations. Results are usually available within a few weeks.

Inheritance of IPEX syndrome is X-linked, which means that the condition is more common in males. Females who carry a mutation in the FOXP3 gene may have mild symptoms or be unaffected. It is recommended that female carriers undergo genetic testing to determine their carrier status.

Genetic testing for IPEX syndrome may be available through a variety of sources, including genetic testing laboratories and healthcare providers with expertise in genetics. It is important to work with a healthcare professional familiar with this condition to interpret the results of genetic testing.

There are several resources available for individuals and families affected by IPEX syndrome. The Immune Deficiency Foundation and the Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center provide information and support. ClinicalTrials.gov is a searchable database of clinical studies that may be recruiting participants for research on IPEX syndrome. PubMed and OMIM are scientific databases that provide access to articles and research on this condition.

Additional information about genetic testing for IPEX syndrome can be found on the websites of these organizations and through online resources such as articles and research studies.

It is important to remember that this information is not intended to replace the advice of a healthcare professional. Genetic testing and the interpretation of results should be done in consultation with a qualified healthcare provider.

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center

The Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) is a free online resource that provides information about genetic and rare diseases. GARD offers a central repository of information on various disorders, including Immune Dysregulation Polyendocrinopathy Enteropathy X-Linked (IPEX) Syndrome.

IPEX Syndrome is a rare genetic condition that affects the immune system and the endocrine system. It is caused by mutations in the FOXP3 gene, which plays a crucial role in the normal function of the immune system. Individuals with IPEX Syndrome often present with a variety of symptoms, including autoimmune disorders affecting the thyroid, gut, skin, and other systems.

The GARD website provides comprehensive information about IPEX Syndrome, including its causes, inheritance pattern, frequency in the population, and available diagnostic testing. It also offers resources for individuals and families affected by IPEX Syndrome, including links to support groups and advocacy organizations.

For individuals seeking more scientific research and articles on IPEX Syndrome, GARD provides links to resources such as PubMed, OMIM, and ClinicalTrials.gov. These platforms offer access to scientific studies, clinical trials, and genetic research related to IPEX Syndrome and other rare immune dysregulation and polyendocrinopathy disorders.

The information available on GARD is regularly updated and reviewed by experts in the field. It serves as a valuable tool for healthcare professionals, researchers, and individuals seeking reliable information on rare diseases, including IPEX Syndrome.

References:

  • 1. Gambineri, E., & Roncarolo, M. G. (2009). Polyendocrinopathy enteropathy X-linked syndrome. In Immunology and Allergy Clinics of North America (Vol. 29, Issue 3, pp. 609–624). Elsevier. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.iac.2009.04.009
  • 2. FOXP3 gene on OMIM. Retrieved from https://omim.org/entry/300292
  • 3. ClinicalTrials.gov. Retrieved from https://clinicaltrials.gov/
  • 4. PubMed. Retrieved from https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/

Patient Support and Advocacy Resources

Patients and families dealing with immune dysregulation polyendocrinopathy enteropathy X-linked (IPEX) syndrome can find support and information through various scientific and genetic resources.

  • OMIM: The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database provides comprehensive information on the genetic causes and clinical features of IPEX syndrome. It includes information on the genes responsible for the condition and their function.
  • Patient Support Groups: Some patient support groups specializing in rare immune and endocrine-associated disorders have resources and information specifically related to IPEX syndrome. They offer support and advocacy for patients and their families.
  • ClinicalTrials.gov: ClinicalTrials.gov provides information on ongoing and upcoming clinical trials related to IPEX syndrome. Patients and families can find information on potential treatment options and research studies they may be eligible to participate in.
  • Genetic Testing: Genes associated with IPEX syndrome can be identified through genetic testing. Patients and families can consult with a genetic counselor or genetic testing center to learn more about available testing options and what they entail.
  • Additional Information: Additional information on IPEX syndrome can be found in scientific articles and research papers. PubMed and other scientific databases provide access to these resources, which can help individuals learn more about the condition and its management.

Patients and families can also seek support from their local medical center or clinic, where healthcare professionals may be able to provide additional resources and information specific to IPEX syndrome.

Research Studies from ClinicalTrials.gov

A research study conducted by ClinicalTrials.gov is aimed at studying the polyendocrinopathy enteropathy X-linked syndrome, also known as immune dysregulation polyendocrinopathy enteropathy X-linked (IPEX) syndrome. This rare genetic disease affects multiple endocrine organs, leading to various symptoms and complications.

One of the main objectives of this study is to understand the inheritance patterns and genetic causes of the disease. Researchers are conducting genetic testing to identify the specific gene mutations responsible for IPEX syndrome. By studying the genes involved, they hope to gain more insight into the underlying mechanisms and develop targeted treatments.

ClinicalTrials.gov also provides resources and support for patients and their families affected by IPEX syndrome. They offer information about the condition, genetic counseling, and advocacy for better management of the disease. The “central” type of IPEX syndrome, which affects the immune system, is the focus of many studies listed on ClinicalTrials.gov to find new and improved treatments.

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Currently, there is no known cure for IPEX syndrome, but through ongoing research, scientists aim to develop better therapies to manage the symptoms and improve the quality of life for affected individuals. ClinicalTrials.gov provides a catalog of ongoing studies investigating IPEX syndrome and other associated diseases and disorders.

For more information on IPEX syndrome and related research studies, the ClinicalTrials.gov website is a valuable resource. Additional scientific literature and resources can be found in PubMed, a free online database for medical research articles.

Key Points about the Research Studies
Inheritance Genetic
Causes Gene mutations
Frequency Rare
Endocrine Disorders Thyroid disorders, diabetes
Associated Diseases Enteropathy, immune system disorders
Resources ClinicalTrials.gov, PubMed
Support Patient advocacy groups, research centers
More Information ClinicalTrials.gov website

Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM

OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) is a comprehensive catalog of genes and genetic disorders. It provides information about various diseases and their associated genes, allowing researchers and healthcare professionals to learn more about different conditions.

One disorder listed in OMIM is Immune Dysregulation Polyendocrinopathy Enteropathy X-Linked (IPEX) syndrome. This rare genetic condition is caused by mutations in the FOXP3 gene, which is located on the X chromosome. It affects the immune system and leads to dysregulation and dysfunction of multiple endocrine glands, resulting in various symptoms and complications.

Some of the endocrine disorders associated with IPEX syndrome include type 1 diabetes, thyroid dysfunction, and adrenal insufficiency. The abnormal functioning of these glands can have significant impacts on an individual’s health and well-being.

Because IPEX syndrome is an X-linked disorder, it primarily affects males. Females, however, can be carriers of the mutated FOXP3 gene and may exhibit milder symptoms. The inheritance pattern of X-linked disorders is different from other genetic conditions, and it is important for affected individuals and their families to understand the genetic basis of the disease.

OMIM provides resources for genetic testing and counseling for individuals with IPEX syndrome. These resources can help in the diagnosis and management of the condition, as well as provide information on the prognosis and available treatment options.

In addition to OMIM, other resources such as PubMed, ClinicalTrials.gov, and advocacy organizations like the Immune Deficiency Foundation and the American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association offer valuable information and support for patients and their families.

Research studies and clinical trials focused on IPEX syndrome and other related conditions are ongoing, aiming to better understand the underlying causes and develop new treatment options. These studies contribute to the advancement of knowledge and improve patient care.

In conclusion, the catalog of genes and diseases from OMIM provides valuable information about IPEX syndrome and other genetic disorders. It offers resources for genetic testing, clinical trials, and support organizations that can help individuals and healthcare professionals learn more about this condition and improve patient care.

Scientific Articles on PubMed

PubMed is a valuable resource for finding scientific articles on Immune dysregulation polyendocrinopathy enteropathy X-linked syndrome and other related conditions. This rare disease, also known as IPEX syndrome, is caused by a genetic mutation in the FOXP3 gene, which affects the immune system’s regulatory function.

Researchers and clinicians use PubMed to access scientific articles and research studies on IPEX syndrome and its associated conditions. These articles provide information on the inheritance pattern, clinical presentations, and management options for patients with the disease. Additionally, PubMed provides access to additional resources, such as clinicaltrialsgov, which catalog ongoing research studies related to IPEX syndrome and its associated conditions.

By searching PubMed, clinicians and researchers can learn more about the frequency and testing for IPEX syndrome, as well as other rare diseases with immune dysregulation and enteropathy. The scientific articles on PubMed provide crucial information for patient advocacy and support, as well as for further research studies on IPEX syndrome and related conditions.

Some of the articles on PubMed discuss the association between IPEX syndrome and specific endocrine disorders, such as diabetes and thyroid conditions. This information is valuable for clinicians who are treating patients with IPEX syndrome and need to be aware of the potential endocrine complications associated with this condition.

References to scientific articles on PubMed can be found on the OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) database, where researchers and clinicians can learn more about the genetic causes and function of the FOXP3 gene in IPEX syndrome. The information from these articles can be further explored on PubMed, providing a comprehensive understanding of the disease and its management.

Resources More Information
PubMed Access scientific articles on Immune dysregulation polyendocrinopathy enteropathy X-linked syndrome
OMIM Learn more about the genetic causes and function of the FOXP3 gene
ClinicalTrials.gov Catalog of ongoing research studies on IPEX syndrome and related conditions

In conclusion, PubMed is a valuable platform for accessing scientific articles on Immune dysregulation polyendocrinopathy enteropathy X-linked syndrome and other related conditions. The articles provide important information on the genetic causes, clinical presentations, and management options for patients with IPEX syndrome. Researchers, clinicians, and patient advocacy groups can use this information to support patients with rare diseases and further advance knowledge in the field of immune dysregulation and enteropathy.

References

  • Immune dysregulation polyendocrinopathy enteropathy X-linked syndrome. (2021, July 30). Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD). Retrieved September 28, 2021, from https://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/diseases/8573/immune-dysregulation-polyendocrinopathy-enteropathy-x-linked-syndrome
  • Kamachi, Y., Fujiki, A., Hara, M., Yamazaki, T., Kitajima, Y., Nakamura, M., Yabe, M., Sumida, T., & Urakami, T. (2011). Coincidence of immunodeficiency and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in an infant with IPEX syndrome: a brief report. Clinical immunology (Orlando, Fla.), 138(3), 336–339. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clim.2010.11.008
  • Polyendocrinopathy, X-Linked. (2021). OMIM – Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man. Retrieved September 28, 2021, from https://omim.org/entry/304790
  • Immune dysregulation polyendocrinopathy enteropathy X-linked syndrome. (2021, August 30). National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD). Retrieved September 28, 2021, from https://rarediseases.org/rare-diseases/immune-dysregulation-polyendocrinopathy-enteropathy-x-linked-syndrome/
  • Immune dysregulation polyendocrinopathy enteropathy X-linked syndrome. (2021). Genetics Home Reference. Retrieved September 28, 2021, from https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/immune-dysregulation-polyendocrinopathy-enteropathy-x-linked-syndrome
  • Polyendocrinopathy-Enteropathy-X-Linked. (2021, July 2). National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS). Retrieved September 28, 2021, from https://rarediseases.org/gard-rare-disease/polyendocrinopathy-enteropathy-x-linked/
  • Immune dysregulation polyendocrinopathy enteropathy X-linked syndrome. (n.d.). U.S. National Library of Medicine. Retrieved September 28, 2021, from https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/?term=immune+dysregulation+polyendocrinopathy+enteropathy+X-linked+syndrome
  • Immune dysregulation polyendocrinopathy enteropathy X-linked syndrome. (n.d.). ClinicalTrials.gov. Retrieved September 28, 2021, from https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/results?cond=immune+dysregulation+polyendocrinopathy+enteropathy+X-linked+syndrome&term=&cntry=&state=&city=&dist=&Search=Search