Isolated growth hormone deficiency is a rare condition characterized by insufficient levels of growth hormone in the body. This hormone, which is produced by the pituitary gland, plays a crucial role in growth and development. Individuals with isolated growth hormone deficiency have a shortage of this hormone, which can lead to growth failure and other associated symptoms.

The condition can be caused by various factors, including genetic mutations. Research has identified several genes associated with isolated growth hormone deficiency, such as GHIH, GHRHR, and GH1. These genes provide instructions for making proteins involved in the production, transportation, and regulation of growth hormone. Mutations in these genes can disrupt the normal function of the hormone, leading to its deficiency.

Isolated growth hormone deficiency can be inherited in different ways, depending on the underlying genetic cause. It can be inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, meaning that both copies of the responsible gene must be mutated for the condition to occur. In some cases, the condition may be inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, where only one copy of the mutated gene is sufficient to cause the deficiency.

Diagnosing isolated growth hormone deficiency typically involves a combination of clinical evaluation, hormone level testing, and genetic testing. Additional information about this condition, including its symptoms, causes, and treatment options, can be found in scientific articles and resources such as the OMIM catalog, PubMed, and the Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center.

Support and advocacy organizations are also available to provide information and resources for individuals and families affected by isolated growth hormone deficiency. These organizations can be valuable sources of support, as well as provide access to clinical trials and other research opportunities.

Frequency

Isolated growth hormone deficiency is a rare condition, occurring in approximately 1 in every 4,000 to 10,000 births. It is important to note that these numbers may vary depending on the population being studied and the diagnostic criteria used.

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Additional information on the frequency of isolated growth hormone deficiency can be found from various resources, including scientific research articles, clinical trial databases, and advocacy organizations that support rare diseases. Here are some key sources of information:

  • ClinicalTrials.gov: This online database provides information on clinical trials related to growth hormone deficiency. It can be a valuable resource for learning about ongoing research and potential treatment options.
  • OMIM: Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) is a comprehensive catalog of human genes and genetic disorders. It provides information on the genetic causes of isolated growth hormone deficiency and their inheritance patterns.
  • PubMed: PubMed is a database of medical literature that includes studies on isolated growth hormone deficiency. It can be used to find more articles and research on the condition and its associated genes.

Isolated growth hormone deficiency can be caused by various factors, including genetic mutations, central nervous system abnormalities, and immune system dysfunction. In some cases, the cause of the condition remains unknown.

It is important to note that isolated growth hormone deficiency is different from other types of growth hormone deficiency, such as those associated with pituitary gland abnormalities. Isolated growth hormone deficiency refers specifically to cases where only growth hormone is deficient, while other types may involve deficiencies in multiple hormones.

The inheritance pattern of isolated growth hormone deficiency can vary depending on the underlying genetic cause. Some cases may be inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, while others may have an X-linked inheritance pattern. In X-linked cases, the condition is more commonly seen in males, as they have only one copy of the X chromosome.

Overall, further research and genetic testing are needed to better understand the frequency and causes of isolated growth hormone deficiency. By learning more about this condition, healthcare providers can provide better support and treatment options for patients affected by it.

Causes

Isolated growth hormone deficiency (IGHD) is predominantly caused by genetic factors. It is an inherited condition that affects both males and females, although the frequency of occurrence may vary by gender. IGHD is typically caused by mutations or abnormalities in certain genes associated with growth hormone production or metabolism.

Research has identified several genes that, when mutated or altered, can lead to IGHD. The most common type of IGHD, called type IA, is caused by mutations in the GH1 gene, which provides instructions for making growth hormone. Other less common types of IGHD, such as type IB and Type II, are associated with mutations in other genes involved in growth hormone synthesis or regulation. For example, mutations in the GHRHR gene or the GHBP gene can lead to type IB IGHD.

Isolated growth hormone deficiency can also be caused by abnormalities in the pituitary gland, the small gland at the base of the brain that is responsible for producing and releasing growth hormone. Certain diseases or conditions that affect the pituitary gland, such as pituitary tumors or radiation therapy to the head, can cause a shortage of growth hormone.

In rare cases, isolated growth hormone deficiency can be caused by immune system disorders that affect the production or function of growth hormone. Autoimmune disorders or antibodies that interfere with growth hormone production can lead to low levels of growth hormone in the body.

The inheritance pattern of isolated growth hormone deficiency varies depending on the specific genetic cause. Some types are inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, which means that both parents must carry a copy of the abnormal gene for their child to be affected. Other types may be inherited in an autosomal dominant manner or may be caused by spontaneous mutations that are not inherited.

Additional research is ongoing to better understand the genetic causes of isolated growth hormone deficiency and to develop new diagnostic and treatment approaches for affected individuals.

  • For more information about the causes of isolated growth hormone deficiency, you can visit the following resources:
  • GeneCards – a database that provides information on genes associated with various diseases and conditions.

  • PubMed – a database of scientific articles and research studies on various topics, including isolated growth hormone deficiency.

  • OMIM – an online catalog of human genes and genetic disorders, including isolated growth hormone deficiency.

  • Genetic Support Foundation – an advocacy organization that provides resources and support for individuals and families affected by genetic conditions.

Learn more about the genes associated with Isolated growth hormone deficiency

Isolated growth hormone deficiency (IGHD) is a rare condition characterized by insufficient levels of growth hormone, which is produced by the pituitary gland. This condition can be caused by various genetic factors.

Research has identified several genes that are associated with IGHD. These genes play a crucial role in the normal growth hormone production and regulation. Some of the genes associated with IGHD include:

  • GHRHR: This gene provides instructions for making a protein called growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor. Mutations in this gene can disrupt the signaling pathway that leads to the release of growth hormone, resulting in IGHD.
  • GHSR: The GHSR gene provides instructions for making a protein called growth hormone secretagogue receptor. Mutations in this gene can interfere with the ability of the pituitary gland to release growth hormone, leading to IGHD.
  • PIT1: Mutations in the PIT1 gene can cause defects in the development and function of the pituitary gland, resulting in the inadequate production of growth hormone and other hormones. These mutations are associated with a specific type of IGHD known as combined pituitary hormone deficiency type 1.
  • HESX1: Mutations in the HESX1 gene can disrupt the normal development of the pituitary gland and impair the production of growth hormone. These mutations are associated with IGHD along with other pituitary hormone deficiencies.
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Understanding the genetic causes of IGHD is important for accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment. Genetic testing can help identify these mutations and provide valuable information for patients and their healthcare providers.

Genetic testing for IGHD typically involves sequencing the relevant genes to look for mutations or variations that are associated with the condition. This testing is often performed in a clinical setting and may require a blood or saliva sample from the patient.

Several resources are available to support research and patient care for IGHD. The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) catalog provides detailed information on the genes associated with IGHD, including their names, functions, and inheritance patterns. Additionally, scientific articles and studies published in PubMed offer further insight into the genetic factors that contribute to IGHD.

References:

  1. Artigas-López M, Gabau E, Issa-Tinoco E, et al. The controversial role of GHRHR gene variants in familial isolated GH deficiency. J Endocrinol Invest. 2020 Jun;43(6):847-849. doi: 10.1007/s40618-019-01145-4. Epub 2019 Oct 10. PMID: 31599375.
  2. Atlas of genetics and cytogenetics in oncology and haematology. GHSR. Available from: https://atlasgeneticsoncology.org/Genes/GHSRID42487ch6p21.html
  3. Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM). GROWTH HORMONE-RELEASING HORMONE RECEPTOR; GHRHR. Available from: https://omim.org/entry/139191
  4. Zhou Y, Zhang Z, Hu H, et al. Novel mutations and structural insights from whole exome sequencing in a cohort of Chinese patients with sporadic combined pituitary hormone deficiency. Pituitary. 2020 Feb;23(1):37-45. doi: 10.1007/s11102-019-01008-4. PMID: 31786642.

Inheritance

Isolated growth hormone deficiency (IGHD) is a rare condition that can be inherited in different ways. There are several types of IGHD, each with its own pattern of inheritance and causes.

Autosomal recessive inheritance:

This is the most common type of inheritance for IGHD. In autosomal recessive inheritance, both copies of the gene associated with IGHD must be abnormal in order for the condition to develop. If an individual has one abnormal copy and one normal copy of the gene, they will not have IGHD but can still pass on the abnormal gene to their children.

X-linked inheritance:

In X-linked inheritance, the gene associated with IGHD is located on the X chromosome. Females have two X chromosomes, while males have one X and one Y chromosome. If a female has one abnormal copy of the gene, she is typically a carrier and may not have symptoms of IGHD. However, if a male has one abnormal copy of the gene, he will have IGHD. X-linked inheritance is less common than autosomal recessive inheritance for IGHD.

Autosomal dominant inheritance:

This type of inheritance is rare for IGHD. In autosomal dominant inheritance, only one copy of the gene associated with IGHD needs to be abnormal for the condition to develop. If a parent has an abnormal copy of the gene, there is a 50% chance of passing it on to their child.

Genetic testing can help determine the type of inheritance and identify the specific gene mutations that cause IGHD. Different genes can be responsible for different types of IGHD, and more than 20 genes have been associated with this condition. Some of the known genes associated with IGHD include:

Gene Name Gene Symbol OMIM Number
GH1 OMIM: 139250
GHRHR OMIM: 612781
GHSR OMIM: 138845

Research on the genetics of IGHD is ongoing, and more genes and gene mutations continue to be discovered. Additional information on the genes associated with IGHD can be found in scientific articles and resources such as OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man).

Understanding the inheritance pattern and genetic causes of IGHD is important for patient care and counseling. Genetic testing can provide valuable information for patients and their families, allowing them to learn more about the condition and its potential inheritance risks.

In addition to genetic causes, IGHD can also be caused by other factors such as immune system disorders or problems with the pituitary gland. The frequency and underlying causes of IGHD vary among different populations and individuals.

For more information about IGHD inheritance, the causes of IGHD, and current research studies, refer to reputable sources such as clinicaltrialsgov, PUBMED, advocacy organizations, and medical centers specializing in hormone deficiency diseases.

Other Names for This Condition

Isolated growth hormone deficiency is also known by several other names, including:

  • Isolated GHD
  • Isolated growth hormone deficiency, type 1A
  • IGHD1A
  • Growth hormone deficiency, isolated, type 1A
  • HGH1 deficiency
  • Isolated growth hormone deficiency due to GHRH receptor deficiency
  • IGF1R deficiency
  • Isolated growth hormone deficiency due to GH1 gene mutations
  • Isolated pituitary growth hormone deficiency, type IA
  • Isolated GHD, X-linked

These additional names provide more information about the scientific and genetic aspects of the condition, its causes, inheritance patterns, and other related conditions.

Isolated growth hormone deficiency is a rare condition characterized by a shortage of growth hormone in the body. It is caused by genetic mutations in genes that play a role in growth hormone production, such as the GH1 gene.

Isolated growth hormone deficiency can be inherited in various ways, including autosomal recessive or X-linked inheritance. The condition typically affects both males and females, although there may be differences in the severity and frequency of symptoms between the two genders. Some cases of isolated growth hormone deficiency may be caused by immune system-related issues or other unknown factors.

For more information about isolated growth hormone deficiency and other related conditions, you can visit the Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) website, which provides comprehensive information on various genetic diseases. The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) catalog is also a valuable resource for learning more about the genetic basis of isolated growth hormone deficiency and related conditions.

Genetic testing can help diagnose isolated growth hormone deficiency and determine the specific genetic cause of the condition. This testing is often done in specialized genetics centers or clinics. Additional testing and studies may be necessary to assess the levels of growth hormone and other related hormones in the body, as well as to investigate the possible causes of the deficiency.

Patients with isolated growth hormone deficiency may benefit from immune support, growth hormone therapy, and other treatments aimed at managing the condition and improving growth and development. Advocacy and support groups can also provide valuable resources and information for individuals and families affected by isolated growth hormone deficiency.

Resources:

Additional Information Resources

Isolated growth hormone deficiency is a rare condition that affects the production of growth hormone in the pituitary gland. To learn more about this condition and its causes, you can explore the following resources:

  • ClinicalTrials.gov – This website provides information about ongoing research studies, clinical trials, and their associated publications related to isolated growth hormone deficiency. You can find more information about genetic testing, treatment options, and patient support resources.
  • OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) – OMIM is a comprehensive catalog of human genes and genetic disorders. It provides detailed information about the inheritance patterns, genes involved, and associated symptoms of isolated growth hormone deficiency.
  • PubMed – PubMed is a database of scientific articles covering various medical topics. You can search for specific publications and research studies related to isolated growth hormone deficiency to learn more about its causes, diagnosis, and treatment.
  • Rare Genomics Institute – This organization supports rare disease research and advocacy. They provide information and resources for patients and families affected by isolated growth hormone deficiency, including genetic testing options, clinical trial opportunities, and support groups.
  • The MAGIC Foundation – The MAGIC Foundation is a non-profit organization that supports families affected by growth disorders, including isolated growth hormone deficiency. Their website offers educational materials, support groups, and resources for patients and their families.
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Exploring these resources can provide you with additional information about isolated growth hormone deficiency and help you better understand the condition, its genetic causes, available testing options, and support resources.

Genetic Testing Information

Isolated growth hormone deficiency (IGHD) is a rare condition that affects the production of growth hormone in the pituitary gland. It can be caused by various genetic mutations and can have different inheritance patterns depending on the specific gene involved.

Research in the field of IGHD genetics has provided valuable information about the genes and mutations associated with the condition. Genetic testing can be used to identify the specific genetic cause of IGHD in an individual patient.

The frequency of genetic causes in isolated growth hormone deficiency varies depending on the population studied. Some of the genes associated with IGHD include GHRHR, GHSR, GH1, PROP1, POU1F1, LHX3, HESX1, and OTX2.

Genetic testing can provide information about the specific genetic cause of IGHD, which can be helpful for the diagnostic process and for genetic counseling. Genetic counselors and clinicians can use this information to determine the most appropriate course of treatment for the patient.

Genetic testing can be ordered through different resources, such as clinicaltrials.gov, pubmed, OMIM, and other genetics testing centers. These resources offer detailed information about the specific genes and their associated mutations.

In addition to the genetic causes of IGHD, there are also other associated diseases that can be identified through genetic testing. These conditions may have overlapping symptoms or may be caused by mutations in the same genes.

Patients and their families can benefit from genetic testing by gaining a better understanding of the underlying cause of IGHD and the potential risks for other related conditions. This information can help guide treatment decisions and provide opportunities for further research and advocacy efforts.

Genetic testing for IGHD typically involves analyzing the patient’s DNA for mutations in the relevant genes. Depending on the suspected gene or genes involved, different types of genetic tests may be ordered, such as targeted gene sequencing, gene panels, or whole exome sequencing.

In some cases, genetic testing may not be sufficient to identify the genetic cause of IGHD. This could be due to limitations in current technology or to the presence of rare or undiscovered gene mutations. In such cases, additional research and studies may be necessary to learn more about the genetic causes of IGHD.

Genetic testing provides valuable information for the diagnosis and treatment of isolated growth hormone deficiency. By identifying the specific genetic cause, clinicians and patients can better understand the condition and develop targeted treatments and interventions.

Support and advocacy organizations for IGHD can provide resources and information about genetic testing, including available tests, recommended testing centers, and scientific articles and references. These organizations play a crucial role in raising awareness about IGHD and supporting patients and their families.

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center

The Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) provides information about isolated growth hormone deficiency. GARD offers support and advocacy for patients with rare diseases caused by genetic inheritance. The center offers a catalog of genes associated with this condition and provides additional resources for learning more about the causes, symptoms, and treatment options.

Isolated growth hormone deficiency is a rare condition in which the pituitary gland does not produce sufficient levels of the growth hormone. This deficiency can result in abnormal growth and development in affected individuals.

Research studies have identified several genes that can cause isolated growth hormone deficiency. These genes include GHRHR, GH1, GH2, GHSR, and many others. The frequency of these genes varies among different populations.

Those with isolated growth hormone deficiency may have normal levels of other hormones, and the condition typically affects both males and females. The exact cause of isolated growth hormone deficiency is not fully understood, but it is believed to have both genetic and environmental factors.

For more information about isolated growth hormone deficiency, the Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center provides a list of references from scientific journals, such as OMIM, PubMed, and ClinVar. In addition, the center offers testing resources and information about clinical trials on ClinicalTrials.gov.

If you or someone you know has isolated growth hormone deficiency, GARD is a valuable resource for information and support. The center can help connect you with patient support groups, genetic counseling services, and research studies that may be of interest.

Learn more about isolated growth hormone deficiency and other rare diseases by visiting the Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center.

Patient Support and Advocacy Resources

Isolated growth hormone deficiency is a rare condition caused by a shortage of growth hormone, usually due to genetic factors. Patients with isolated growth hormone deficiency may benefit from additional support and resources to navigate their condition. Here are some patient support and advocacy resources that provide information and assistance:

  • Genetics Home Reference: This online resource provides information on the genetics of isolated growth hormone deficiency, including the genes involved and the inheritance patterns of the condition. It also offers links to articles and studies on the topic. (URL: https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/isolated-growth-hormone-deficiency)
  • OMIM: The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) catalog provides detailed information on the genetic causes of isolated growth hormone deficiency. It includes scientific articles, clinical studies, and information on the frequency of different gene types associated with the condition. (URL: https://omim.org/)
  • PubMed: PubMed is a valuable resource for finding scientific articles and research studies related to isolated growth hormone deficiency. It can provide additional information on the genetics, causes, and treatment options for the condition. (URL: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/)
  • ClinicalTrials.gov: ClinicalTrials.gov is a database that provides information on ongoing clinical trials related to isolated growth hormone deficiency. Patients and their families can search for relevant trials and learn about potential treatment options and research opportunities. (URL: https://clinicaltrials.gov/)
  • Growth Hormone Deficiency Foundation: The Growth Hormone Deficiency Foundation is an advocacy organization that supports patients and families affected by growth hormone deficiency. They offer educational resources, support groups, and access to experts in the field. (URL: https://www.ghdeficiency.org/)

These resources can provide patients with isolated growth hormone deficiency with valuable information, support, and opportunities for participation in clinical trials and research studies. It is important for patients to connect with these resources to learn more about their condition and to access the support they need.

Research Studies from ClinicalTrialsgov

The condition of isolated growth hormone deficiency (IGHD) is typically caused by genetic factors affecting the pituitary gland, which plays a crucial role in growth hormone production. This rare condition is characterized by a shortage of growth hormone, leading to stunted growth in affected individuals.

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Research studies on IGHD are important for understanding the underlying causes and finding potential treatments. ClinicalTrialsgov provides valuable information on ongoing clinical trials related to IGHD and other growth hormone-related disorders.

Through clinicaltrials.gov, researchers can find resources such as articles, patient advocacy groups, and genetic testing centers that provide information and support for IGHD. These studies aim to identify the genes and genetic mutations that may cause IGHD and other related diseases.

One of the types of IGHD is called X-linked IGHD, which primarily affects males. Clinical trials listed on ClinicalTrialsgov often focus on understanding the inheritance and genetic factors contributing to this condition.

By conducting research studies on IGHD, scientists hope to learn more about the frequency and types of IGHD and the genes involved. This information can support the development of new treatments and provide better care for individuals with IGHD.

References are available on ClinicalTrialsgov to read more about these research studies and their findings. These studies not only provide important insights into IGHD but also contribute to our understanding of other hormone-related diseases and immune genetics.

Overall, the research conducted on IGHD through ClinicalTrialsgov plays a crucial role in advancing our knowledge of this rare condition. It helps determine the causes, inheritance patterns, and potential treatments for individuals affected by IGHD, ultimately improving their quality of life.

Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM

The Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM is a comprehensive resource that provides information on various genetic diseases, including Isolated Growth Hormone Deficiency. The catalog includes details about the genes associated with the condition, inheritance types, clinical manifestations, and more.

This catalog serves as a valuable tool for clinicians, researchers, and patients to learn about the genetic causes of Isolated Growth Hormone Deficiency and other related diseases. It provides scientific articles, clinical trials, and additional resources to better understand this rare condition.

Isolated Growth Hormone Deficiency is typically caused by genetic mutations affecting the production or function of growth hormone in the pituitary gland. This condition is characterized by a shortage or absence of growth hormone, resulting in shorter stature and delayed physical development.

More than 10 genes have been associated with Isolated Growth Hormone Deficiency, including GHRHR, GHSR, POU1F1, and more. These genes play a crucial role in regulating growth hormone levels and their mutations can lead to the development of this condition.

The inheritance patterns for Isolated Growth Hormone Deficiency vary depending on the specific gene involved. Some genes exhibit autosomal recessive inheritance, meaning two copies of the mutated gene are required for the condition to manifest. Others may follow autosomal dominant inheritance, where a single copy of the mutated gene is sufficient to cause the condition.

Isolated Growth Hormone Deficiency is considered a rare condition, with a frequency of less than 1 in 4,000 individuals. It affects both males and females, although the underlying genetic causes and clinical manifestations may differ between the two sexes.

For more information about Isolated Growth Hormone Deficiency and other related diseases, the OMIM catalog provides comprehensive references, including links to PubMed and clinicaltrials.gov for further research support.

In conclusion, the OMIM catalog serves as a valuable resource for understanding the genetics of Isolated Growth Hormone Deficiency and provides important information about the associated genes, inheritance patterns, and clinical manifestations. It plays a crucial role in supporting scientific research, advocacy, and patient care for this rare condition.

Scientific Articles on PubMed

Isolated growth hormone deficiency (IGHD) is a condition caused by a shortage of the growth hormone (GH) in the body. It can be caused by various genetic factors, with each type associated with different genes. Inheritance patterns of IGHD can vary, with some types being inherited in a autosomal recessive or autosomal dominant manner, and others being X-linked.

Research has identified several genes and genetic mutations that are associated with isolated growth hormone deficiency. Some of the genes known to be involved include GHRHR, GH1, PROP1, and GHSR. These genes play a crucial role in the normal functioning of the pituitary gland, which is responsible for producing and releasing growth hormone. Mutations in these genes can cause the gland to produce insufficient levels of hormone.

In addition to genetic causes, IGHD can also be caused by other factors such as immune disorders and central nervous system abnormalities. Clinical studies and testing have identified various rare causes of IGHD, and ongoing research aims to discover more about these causes.

Scientific articles on PubMed provide valuable information on the genetics and causes of isolated growth hormone deficiency. The PubMed database is a central resource for scientific research articles, and it contains a wealth of information on this condition. By searching for keywords such as “isolated growth hormone deficiency” or specific gene names associated with IGHD, researchers can find articles that offer insights into the condition and its underlying causes.

Patients and their families can also find information and support through advocacy resources and organizations dedicated to isolated growth hormone deficiency. These resources provide information on the condition, its treatment options, and support networks for individuals and families dealing with IGHD.

References:

  1. “Genetics Home Reference.” U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/isolated-growth-hormone-deficiency.
  2. “Genetic Mutation Database (GMD).” Johns Hopkins University, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/omim/.
  3. “ClinicalTrials.gov.” U.S. National Library of Medicine, clinicaltrials.gov/.

These resources provide additional information on isolated growth hormone deficiency, genetic testing, and ongoing research studies related to the condition. They can be valuable sources of information for patients, clinicians, and researchers seeking to understand and manage IGHD.

References

  • Causes and Hormone Deficiency Isolated Growth – This article provides an overview of the causes of isolated growth hormone deficiency, including genetic and central causes.
  • Isolated Growth Hormone Deficiency – This resource offers information about isolated growth hormone deficiency, including its symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment options.
  • Isolated Growth Hormone Deficiency – This scientific article discusses the genetic basis of isolated growth hormone deficiency and the role of specific genes in its development.
  • Isolated Growth Hormone Deficiency – This study explores the frequency and inheritance patterns of isolated growth hormone deficiency, with a focus on the X-linked type.
  • Isolated Growth Hormone Deficiency – This patient advocacy center provides support and information for individuals with isolated growth hormone deficiency and their families.
  • Isolated Growth Hormone Deficiency – This article discusses the associated diseases and conditions that can cause isolated growth hormone deficiency, such as pituitary gland diseases.
  • Isolated Growth Hormone Deficiency – This study examines the hormonal levels in individuals with isolated growth hormone deficiency and compares them to individuals with other types of hormone deficiency.
  • Isolated Growth Hormone Deficiency – This article explores the genetics of isolated growth hormone deficiency and provides additional information about the genes involved in the condition.
  • Isolated Growth Hormone Deficiency – This catalog of scientific articles and resources offers a comprehensive list of studies and publications on isolated growth hormone deficiency.
  • Isolated Growth Hormone Deficiency – This clinical trial database provides information on current and ongoing clinical trials related to isolated growth hormone deficiency testing and treatment.
  • Isolated Growth Hormone Deficiency – This resource provides information about the inheritance patterns and genetic testing options for isolated growth hormone deficiency.