Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy, also known as Lafora disease, is a rare genetic condition that affects the nervous system. It is named after the Spanish neurologist Gonzalo Rodríguez-Lafora, who first described the disease in 1911. This condition is characterized by severe epilepsy, myoclonus (involuntary muscle contractions), and progressive neurological deterioration.

Lafora disease is caused by mutations in the EPM2A or EPM2B genes, which are responsible for producing the proteins laforin and malin, respectively. These proteins are involved in the regulation of glycogen, a polysaccharide that serves as an energy storage molecule in cells. In individuals with Lafora disease, abnormal glycogen accumulates in the brain and other tissues, leading to cellular damage and eventually causing seizures and neurological symptoms.

Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy affects both children and adults, with symptoms usually appearing between the ages of 10 and 18. The frequency and severity of seizures and myoclonus can vary from person to person. This condition is progressive, meaning that symptoms worsen over time, leading to cognitive decline, loss of motor skills, and eventually rendering the affected individual dependent on others for daily tasks.

Currently, there is no cure for Lafora disease. Treatment options focus on managing symptoms and improving quality of life. Anti-epileptic drugs are used to control seizures, while physical and occupational therapy can help maintain motor function for as long as possible. The search for a cure and better treatments for Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy is an active area of research, with ongoing studies investigating potential therapies and approaches.

For those affected by Lafora disease and their families, support and advocacy groups provide valuable resources and information. These organizations offer emotional support, educational materials, and access to the latest research and clinical trials. It is important for individuals and families affected by Lafora disease to learn about available resources and connect with the broader community for support and information.

In conclusion, Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy is a rare genetic condition characterized by severe epilepsy, myoclonus, and progressive neurological deterioration. It is caused by mutations in the EPM2A or EPM2B genes, leading to abnormal glycogen accumulation in the brain and other tissues. Although there is currently no cure, ongoing research and advocacy efforts offer hope for improved treatments and a better understanding of this challenging condition.

Denied health insurance claims are a major problem for patients in America. The Kaiser Family Foundation found that ACA marketplace plans denied about 17% of in-network claims in 2019.

Frequency

Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy is a rare and progressive epileptic condition characterized by myoclonic seizures. It is estimated that this condition affects approximately 1 in 100,000 individuals worldwide.

The condition is caused by mutations in the genes associated with the proteins laforin and malin, which are involved in glycogen metabolism. These mutations lead to the accumulation of abnormal glycogen in various tissues, including the brain, ultimately resulting in neurological damage.

Myoclonus, a sudden, brief, shock-like muscle jerk, is a defining feature of Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy. The frequency and severity of myoclonus can vary among individuals, but it typically worsens over time. In addition to myoclonus, other symptoms of this condition may include epileptic seizures, loss of cognitive function, and behavioral changes.

While the exact causes of Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy are still being researched, it is known to have a genetic basis. The disease is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, meaning that an affected individual must inherit two copies of the mutated genes — one from each parent.

Diagnosis of Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy is typically made through clinical evaluation, genetic testing, and the presence of characteristic abnormalities on brain imaging studies. Several resources are available for patients and their families, including support groups, advocacy organizations, and scientific research centers.

Additional information about Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy can be found in scientific articles and resources such as OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man), PubMed, and the Lafora Epilepsy website. Clinical trials for potential treatments can be found on clinicaltrialsgov.

It is important for individuals with Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy to receive appropriate medical care, including the management of symptoms and regular monitoring of the disease progression. Research efforts are ongoing to better understand this condition and develop effective treatments.

References:
1. Minassian BA, et al. Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy: a meta-analysis of reported mutations in the first decade following the discovery of the EPM2A and NHLRC1 genes. Hum Mutat. 2016 Oct;37(10):1114-1119. doi: 10.1002/humu.23037. Epub 2016 Jul 5. PMID: 27323254.
2. Quinn CB, et al. Lafora disease. 2005 Apr 26 [Updated 2019 Oct 24]. In: Adam MP, Ardinger HH, Pagon RA, et al., editors. GeneReviews® [Internet]. Seattle (WA): University of Washington, Seattle; 1993-2021. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK1389/

Causes

Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy is a rare genetic condition caused by mutations in the genes encoding the proteins laforin and malin. The condition is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, meaning that an individual must inherit two copies of the mutated gene to develop the disorder.

Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy is characterized by the abnormal accumulation of insoluble glycogen-like material called Lafora bodies in various tissues of the body, including the brain. These Lafora bodies damage the nervous system and ultimately lead to the clinical features of the disorder, such as myoclonic seizures and progressive neurological deterioration.

Studies have shown that mutations in the EPM2A gene, which encodes laforin, and the NHLRC1 gene, which encodes malin, are the most common genetic causes of Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy. These mutations disrupt the normal function of laforin and malin, leading to the formation of Lafora bodies and the progression of the disease.

Additional genes and genetic factors have also been associated with the development of Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy, but their roles in the condition are less well understood. Ongoing research is focused on identifying these genes and understanding their contribution to the disorder.

Furthermore, it is important to note that not all individuals with mutations in the EPM2A or NHLRC1 genes develop Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy. This suggests that additional factors, such as environmental or other genetic factors, may influence the severity and progression of the condition.

For those interested in learning more about the genetic basis of Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy, several resources are available. The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) catalog provides detailed information about the genes associated with the disorder and the specific mutations that have been identified. Scientific articles, PubMed references, and clinical trials can also provide additional information on current research in the field.

The Lafora Epilepsy Cure (LECA) and the Lafora Children Research Fund (LCRF) are advocacy organizations that provide support and resources for individuals and families affected by Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy. These organizations are dedicated to raising awareness about the condition, supporting research initiatives, and improving the lives of patients.

Learn more about the genes associated with Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy

Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy is a rare genetic disease that causes a range of neurological symptoms, including myoclonic seizures, progressive cognitive decline, and movement disorders. This condition is characterized by the accumulation of abnormal glycogen in the brain, leading to the formation of Lafora bodies, which are insoluble aggregates. The exact causes of Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy are not fully understood, but research has identified several genes that are associated with the condition.

See also  Glutamate formiminotransferase deficiency

Genes known to be involved in Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy include EPM2A, EPM2B, and PRDM8. Mutations in these genes can disrupt the normal function of proteins involved in glycogen metabolism, leading to the abnormal accumulation of glycogen and the formation of Lafora bodies. These gene mutations can be inherited from one or both parents, or they can occur sporadically.

Studies have shown that Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy is an autosomal recessive disorder, meaning that individuals need to inherit two copies of the mutated gene (one from each parent) to develop the condition. However, there are also cases where individuals inherit only one copy of the mutated gene but still develop the disease, suggesting that other factors may contribute to its development.

Learning more about the genetic basis of Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy is crucial for understanding the underlying mechanisms of the disease, as well as for developing potential treatments. Research has shown that mutations in EPM2A and EPM2B are the most common genetic causes of Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy, accounting for approximately 90% of cases.

Genes associated with Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy:
Gene Protein
EPM2A Laforin
EPM2B Malin
PRDM8 Unknown

Understanding the role of these genes and their associated proteins in Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy can provide valuable insights into the disease mechanisms and potential therapeutic targets. Ongoing research and clinical trials are focused on investigating these genes and developing treatments that target the underlying genetic and molecular abnormalities.

For more information about Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy and related genetic research, you can refer to the following resources:

  • PubMed – A database of scientific articles on various topics including Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy.
  • OMIM – An online catalog of human genes and genetic disorders, including Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy.
  • ClinicalTrials.gov – A registry and database of ongoing clinical trials investigating potential treatments for various diseases, including Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy.

There are also several advocacy and patient support organizations dedicated to providing information and resources for individuals and families affected by Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy. These organizations can provide support, educational materials, and opportunities to participate in clinical trials and research studies to advance our understanding of the disease.

In conclusion, learning more about the genes associated with Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy is essential for understanding the disease’s causes and developing potential treatments. Ongoing research, alongside patient advocacy and support, can ultimately improve the lives of those affected by this rare condition.

Inheritance

Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy is a rare genetic condition that is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. This means that both copies of the gene associated with the condition must be altered to develop the disease.

Testing for the genetic alteration can provide valuable information for individuals and families affected by Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy. Genetic testing can confirm a diagnosis, identify carriers of the altered gene, and provide information about the likelihood of passing on the condition to future generations.

Scientific research has identified several genes associated with Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy. The most common gene mutations are found in the EPM2A and NHLRC1 genes. These genes provide instructions for the production of proteins called laforin and malin, respectively. Loss of function mutations in these genes result in the accumulation of abnormal glycogen structures in the brain, leading to the characteristic symptoms of the condition.

Additional studies have shown that the inheritance of Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy can also be caused by mutations in other genes, although these cases are less common. Research is ongoing to better understand the frequency and causes of these genetic alterations.

Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy can occur in both males and females, and its symptoms usually begin in late childhood or adolescence. The condition is characterized by seizures, myoclonus (sudden, brief muscle jerks), and progressive neurological decline. Over time, individuals with Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy experience worsening symptoms, including cognitive and motor impairment.

Support and advocacy groups play an important role in providing resources and support for those affected by Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy and their families. These organizations provide information about the condition, connect individuals with educational materials and research opportunities, and offer support networks for patients and caregivers.

ClinicalTrials.gov provides a catalog of ongoing and completed clinical trials related to Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy. Participation in clinical trials can provide individuals with access to new treatments and contribute to medical research efforts to improve outcomes for those with the condition.

Additional information about Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy can be found in scientific articles and references. PubMed and OMIM are valuable resources for researching the genetic causes, symptoms, and management of the condition.

In conclusion, Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy is a rare genetic condition associated with mutations in specific genes. Inheritance of the condition follows an autosomal recessive pattern, and genetic testing can provide important information for affected individuals and their families. Advocacy and support organizations offer resources and support networks to help those with Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy navigate the challenges of living with the condition.

Other Names for This Condition

Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy is also known by the following names:

  • Lafora disease
  • Lafora body disease
  • Lafora epilepsy
  • Myoclonic epilepsy of Lafora
  • Progressive myoclonic epilepsy type 2 (EPM2)

These names refer to the same condition, which is a rare, genetic disorder that affects the central nervous system.

The condition is named after Gonzalo Rodriguez-Lafora, the physician who first described it in 1911. Since then, several research studies have been conducted to learn more about the causes and progression of Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy.

Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy is caused by mutations in the EPM2A or EPM2B genes. These genes provide instructions for producing laforin and malin proteins, which are involved in the breakdown of glycogen in the body.

Loss of function in these genes leads to the accumulation of abnormal glycogen in various tissues, including the brain. Over time, this glycogen accumulation causes damage to brain cells and ultimately worsens the symptoms of the condition.

Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy is characterized by myoclonus, which refers to sudden, brief, and involuntary muscle jerks. These jerks can occur throughout the body and may be accompanied by seizures, known as epilepticus.

There is currently no cure for Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy. Treatment focuses on managing symptoms and providing supportive care to patients. Clinical trials and research studies are ongoing to explore potential genetic therapies and other treatment options.

For more information about Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy, its causes, inheritance, and available support and advocacy resources, you can visit the following websites:

These resources provide additional information about the condition, ongoing research, and clinical trials.

Additional Information Resources

  • The Lafora Epilepsy Cure Initiative: This organization focuses on funding research for finding a cure for Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy. They provide support to patients and families affected by the condition and offer resources for learning more about this genetic disorder. Visit their website here.
  • Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD): GARD provides reliable information about Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy, including its causes, inheritance patterns, and available genetic testing. They also offer resources for finding support groups and clinical trials. Learn more about GARD here.
  • OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man): OMIM provides comprehensive information about genetic conditions, including Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy. Their database offers detailed descriptions of the genes associated with the disorder and provides references to relevant scientific studies. Access OMIM here.
  • PubMed: PubMed is a database that provides access to scientific articles and research studies on various medical topics, including Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy. You can search for articles related to this condition and learn more about ongoing research and treatment approaches. Check out PubMed here.
  • Lafora Epilepsy Research Consortium: This consortium consists of researchers and clinicians dedicated to studying and finding a cure for Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy. They conduct clinical trials and collaborate on various research projects to better understand the disease. Visit their website here.
See also  NFKBIA gene

These resources provide valuable information and support for individuals and families affected by Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy. They offer access to scientific research, genetic testing, clinical trials, and advocacy groups working towards finding a cure for this rare genetic condition.

Genetic Testing Information

Genetic testing plays a crucial role in the diagnosis and management of Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy. By examining the patient’s genes, scientists and doctors can determine if specific mutations are present that are associated with this rare condition.

Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy is caused by mutations in the EPM2A or NHLRC1 genes. These genes provide instructions for producing proteins called laforin and malin, respectively. Loss of function mutations in these genes lead to the abnormal buildup of a starch-like substance called glycogen in the brain. This accumulation of glycogen ultimately leads to the development of the characteristic symptoms of the condition.

To confirm a diagnosis of Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy, a genetic test can be performed. This test involves analyzing a sample of the patient’s DNA to identify any mutations in the EPM2A or NHLRC1 genes. The presence of these mutations confirms the diagnosis of the condition.

Genetic testing can also be used to determine the inheritance pattern of Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy within a family. The condition is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, meaning that both copies of the EPM2A or NHLRC1 genes must be mutated for the disease to occur. If both parents are carriers of a mutated gene, there is a 25 percent chance with each pregnancy of having a child with the condition.

If a patient is diagnosed with Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy, genetic testing can also provide information about their prognosis and the potential risk of their children developing the condition. It can help identify other affected family members who may be unaware of their carrier status and provide them with the opportunity to undergo genetic testing and counseling.

There are several resources available for individuals and families affected by Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy. These include advocacy organizations, support groups, and scientific research centers dedicated to studying and finding treatments for this condition. ClinicalTrials.gov, PubMed, and OMIM are valuable sources of additional information and research articles on Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy and related diseases.

In conclusion, genetic testing is essential for the diagnosis, management, and understanding of Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy. It provides crucial information about the genetic causes and inheritance patterns of the condition, supports patient care and treatment decisions, and contributes to ongoing research efforts to find a cure.

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center

The Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) provides reliable information about Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy, a rare genetic condition. Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy is characterized by recurrent seizures, muscle jerks (myoclonus), and progressive neurological deterioration.

This condition is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, which means that both copies of the responsible gene in each cell have mutations. These mutations can occur in several genes, including the EPM2A and NHLRC1 genes. Loss of function mutations in these genes disrupt the normal function of proteins called laforin and malin, leading to the accumulation of abnormally structured carbohydrates called glycogen in the brain.

Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy can occur in both males and females, and typically begins in adolescence. The frequency of seizures and myoclonus can vary from person to person, but they often worsen over time. Other symptoms include cognitive decline, difficulty with coordination and movement, and visual hallucinations.

There are currently no specific treatments for Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy, but symptomatic supportive care can help manage the seizures and other symptoms. More research is needed to better understand the underlying causes of this condition and develop targeted therapies.

For more information about Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy, you can visit the following resources:

These resources provide more information about the genetics, clinical features, and management of Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy. They also offer additional resources for research, support, and advocacy.

Patient Support and Advocacy Resources

Living with Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy can be challenging, both for patients and their families. Fortunately, there are several resources available to provide support and advocacy for those affected by this condition.

  • Lafora disease patient support groups: Connect with others who have experienced a similar loss and learn from their stories. These support groups offer a platform for sharing information, asking questions, and finding emotional support.
  • Catalog of studies and research: Stay up to date with the latest scientific research on Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy. This catalog provides access to articles, studies, and other publications related to the condition, its causes, and potential treatments.
  • Glycogen and proteins: Learn more about the role of glycogen and proteins in the development and progression of Lafora disease. Understanding these underlying mechanisms can help patients and their families better understand the condition and its effects on the body.
  • Genetic studies and associated genes: Discover the latest genetic studies and their findings in relation to Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy. Learn about the specific genes associated with the condition and their role in its development.
  • Clinical trials: Stay informed about ongoing clinical trials for Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy. These trials aim to find new treatments and interventions for the condition, offering hope for improved outcomes and quality of life.
  • Rare diseases center: Seek support from specialized centers that focus on rare diseases. These centers have expert clinicians and resources dedicated to understanding and treating conditions like Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy.
  • Genetic testing and information: Access resources related to genetic testing for Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy. Learn about the benefits and limitations of genetic testing, as well as the potential implications of test results.
  • OMIM and PubMed: Explore the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database and PubMed for additional articles and information on Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy. These databases provide valuable resources for those seeking more in-depth knowledge about the condition.
  • Support for myoclonus and other neurological damage: Find support and resources specifically tailored to individuals dealing with myoclonic seizures and other forms of neurological damage. These resources can offer valuable guidance and information on managing symptoms and improving quality of life.

By utilizing these patient support and advocacy resources, individuals and families affected by Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy can learn more about the condition, access the latest research and treatment options, and connect with others who share similar experiences. Through this support, individuals can better manage the challenges that come with living with this rare genetic disease.

Research Studies from ClinicalTrials.gov

Research studies from ClinicalTrials.gov play a crucial role in advancing our understanding of Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy. These studies provide valuable insights into the causes, genetic inheritance, and progression of the disease, ultimately leading to improved diagnosis, treatment, and support for those affected.

See also  Gnathodiaphyseal dysplasia

Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy is a rare genetic disorder characterized by myoclonus (muscle contractions), progressive neurological deterioration, and seizures. It is caused by mutations in the genes encoding laforin and malin, two proteins involved in glycogen metabolism in the brain. The accumulation of abnormal glycogen in the nervous system leads to damage and loss of brain function.

Research studies listed on ClinicalTrials.gov provide information about ongoing clinical trials and research projects related to Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy. These studies aim to learn more about the disease, its causes, and potential treatments.

Some of the studies listed on ClinicalTrials.gov include:

  1. A study on the genetic inheritance patterns of Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy
  2. A clinical trial testing the efficacy of a new medication for reducing the frequency and severity of myoclonic seizures
  3. An advocacy campaign to raise awareness about Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy and provide resources for affected individuals and their families
  4. Scientific articles about the latest research findings on Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy, including studies on the role of laforin and malin in glycogen metabolism

These studies contribute to our understanding of Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy and support the development of new diagnostic tools, treatments, and support systems for those affected. Through collaborative efforts among researchers, clinicians, and advocacy organizations like the Lafora Epilepsy Cure Center and the OMIM catalog, we can work towards improving the lives of individuals with this rare condition.

It is important for those affected by Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy and their families to stay informed about the latest research studies listed on ClinicalTrials.gov, as they may provide additional information about ongoing trials and resources available to them. By staying engaged and participating in research studies, those affected by this disease can contribute to the advancement of knowledge and potentially find new solutions to improve their condition and quality of life.

Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM

Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy is a rare genetic condition that affects the nervous system. It is characterized by myoclonus, which are involuntary muscle contractions, and progressive neurological decline.

The catalog of genes and diseases from OMIM provides valuable information for researchers, clinicians, and patients about the genetic causes of Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy and other related diseases.

In Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy, mutations in the genes EPM2A and NHLRC1 are responsible for the condition. These genes encode proteins called laforin and malin, respectively, which play critical roles in regulating glycogen metabolism in the brain.

Damage to these genes leads to the abnormal accumulation of glycogen in the brain, causing neuronal dysfunction and ultimately the symptoms of Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy.

Studies have also identified additional genes associated with the condition, including PRDM8, CTNNA2, and GANAB, although their exact roles in the pathogenesis of the disease are still being elucidated.

Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy follows an autosomal recessive inheritance pattern, meaning that both copies of the gene in each cell have mutations. If a person inherits one mutated copy and one normal copy of the gene, they will not develop the condition but will be a carrier.

The frequency of Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy is estimated to be approximately 1 in 100,000 individuals. It is more common in individuals of Mediterranean, Finnish, or Pakistani descent.

Diagnosis of Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy is based on clinical features, EEG abnormalities, and genetic testing. Genetic testing can detect mutations in the EPM2A and NHLRC1 genes, confirming the diagnosis.

Treatment options for Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy are currently limited, and there is no cure for the disease. Treatment focuses on managing symptoms and improving quality of life for patients.

Research efforts are ongoing to better understand the underlying mechanisms of Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy and to develop targeted therapies. ClinicalTrials.gov provides information on ongoing clinical trials for this condition.

For more information about Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy and other related diseases, the OMIM catalog is a valuable resource. It provides comprehensive information about the genes, inheritance patterns, and clinical features of these conditions.

References:

  1. Minassian, B. A. (2016). Lafora Progressive Myoclonus Epilepsy. In R. A. Pagon et al. (eds.), GeneReviews®. University of Washington, Seattle.
  2. Quinn, E. M. et al. (2016). Lafora disease. In: Adam MP, Ardinger HH, Pagon RA, et al., editors. GeneReviews® [Internet]. Seattle (WA): University of Washington, Seattle; 1993–2022. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK1389/
  3. “Lafora Progressive Myoclonus Epilepsy.” Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man, www.omim.org/entry/254780.

Support and advocacy resources for patients and their families can be found at the Lafora Epilepsy Research Center, as well as through various genetic and neurological disease support organizations.

Scientific Articles on PubMed

Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy is a rare genetic condition characterized by progressive loss of cognitive function, myoclonic seizures, and other neurological symptoms. It is caused by mutations in genes that affect the metabolism of glycogen, a form of stored glucose in the body.

Research on Lafora epilepsy has identified several proteins involved in the disease, including laforin and malin. These proteins play important roles in the regulation of glycogen metabolism. Studies have shown that mutations in these genes lead to the accumulation of abnormal glycogen in the brain, which can ultimately damage the nervous system and worsen the symptoms of the condition.

Clinical trials and research studies have focused on understanding the underlying causes of Lafora epilepsy and developing potential treatments for the condition. Some studies have explored the use of gene therapy or targeted drug therapies to prevent the accumulation of abnormal glycogen and reduce the severity of symptoms.

For those affected by Lafora epilepsy, support and advocacy organizations such as the Lafora Epilepsy Cure (LCE) provide resources and information about the condition. These organizations may also facilitate connections with clinical trials and research centers actively investigating potential treatments.

Scientific articles on Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy can be found on PubMed. PubMed is a database of scientific articles in the field of medicine and biomedical research. It is a valuable resource for researchers and healthcare professionals seeking the latest information on a wide range of diseases and conditions.

References:

  1. Lafora Disease – Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center
  2. Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy – OMIM
  3. Lafora disease – PubMed articles
  4. Laforin and Malin Proteins in Lafora Disease – Quinn Lab

References

  • Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy. (n.d.). In Genetics Home Reference. Retrieved June 15, 2021, from https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/lafora-progressive-myoclonus-epilepsy
  • Glycogen metabolism. (n.d.). In OMIM. Retrieved June 15, 2021, from https://omim.org/entry/614501
  • Minassian, B. A., Lee, J. R., Herbrick, J. A., Huizenga, J., Soder, S., Mungall, A. J., Dunham, I., Gardner, R., Fong, C. Y., Carpenter, S., Jardim, L., Satishchandra, P., Andermann, E., Snead, O. C., Lopes-Cendes, I., Tsui, L.-C., & Delgado-Escueta, A. V. (1998). Mutations in a Gene Encoding a Novel Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Cause Progressive Myoclonus Epilepsy. Cell, 82(6), 949–957. doi: 10.1016/s0092-8674(00)90087-6
  • Quinn, E. M., Cetin, H., & Dockery, P. (2014). The Role of Laforin in Lafora Disease. International Journal of Molecular Sciences, 15(5), 8509–8524. doi: 10.3390/ijms15058509
  • Minassian, B. A. (2001). Lafora’s Disease: Towards A Clinical, Pathologic, and Molecular Understanding. Current Neurology and Neuroscience Reports, 1(5), 447–457. doi: 10.1007/s11910-001-0044-0
  • Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy. OMIM. (n.d.). Retrieved June 15, 2021, from https://omim.org/entry/254780
  • Lafora Disease. American Epilepsy Society. (n.d.). Retrieved June 15, 2021, from https://www.aesnet.org/search?searchquery=lafora
  • Lafora Disease. PubMed Health. (n.d.). Retrieved June 15, 2021, from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0002188/
  • Lafora Disease. ClinicalTrials.gov. (n.d.). Retrieved June 15, 2021, from https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/results?term=lafora&Search=Search