The MIR17HG gene is located in the central cluster of related genes on chromosome 13. It has been associated with overgrowth and several listed diseases and conditions. Changes or variants in the miRNAs of the MIR17HG gene have been linked to various genetic disorders, including Feingold syndrome and developmental disorders.

Testing for changes in the MIR17HG gene can be used to reduce the number of genes that need to be tested for certain features or conditions. Information about the gene and its associated disorders can be found in online scientific resources, such as OMIM and PubMed, which provide references to articles and databases for additional information.

Feingold syndrome, one of the conditions associated with changes in the MIR17HG gene, is characterized by changes in the fingers and other features. It is listed in the Genetic Testing Registry and the Gene Reviews database, which provide information and resources for testing and genetic counseling.

While changes in the MIR17HG gene have been linked to certain developmental disorders, additional research is needed to fully understand the role of this gene in normal growth and development. Studies have also indicated a potential association between changes in the MIR17HG gene and certain cancers.

Genetic changes in the MIR17HG gene have been associated with various health conditions. These changes can be detected through genetic testing and may lead to overgrowth syndromes and other developmental disorders.

One of the health conditions related to genetic changes in the MIR17HG gene is Feingold syndrome. Feingold syndrome is characterized by features such as microcephaly (abnormally small head size), intellectual disability, and finger abnormalities. Changes in the MIR17HG gene can contribute to the development of Feingold syndrome.

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There are other health conditions associated with changes in the MIR17HG gene as well. These conditions may have overlapping symptoms or specific features. Examples of these conditions include cancers, growth disorders, and central nervous system abnormalities.

Information about these health conditions and associated genetic changes can be found in various resources such as genetic databases and scientific articles. OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) is one of the resources that provides detailed information about genes and genetic disorders. The Feingold Syndrome Variant Registry is another useful resource for information and references related to Feingold syndrome.

Genetic testing can help identify changes in the MIR17HG gene, which can provide valuable information for diagnosis and management of these health conditions. Testing may involve analyzing the DNA of cells from individuals suspected to have a condition related to MIR17HG gene changes.

It is important to consult with healthcare professionals and genetic counselors for more accurate and comprehensive information about these health conditions and associated genetic changes. They can provide additional references and guide individuals and families in understanding the implications of these genetic changes.

Feingold syndrome

Feingold syndrome is a rare genetic condition characterized by various developmental disorders and features. It is named after Dr. Albert Feingold, who first described this condition in 1975. The condition is also known as Feingold syndrome type 1 (FGLDS1) and is associated with changes in the MIR17HG gene.

The MIR17HG gene is located on chromosome 13 and is a part of the cluster of genes known as the MIR17HG gene cluster. This cluster includes several other genes and microRNAs (miRNAs) that play important roles in growth and development.

Feingold syndrome is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern, which means that a variant in one copy of the MIR17HG gene is sufficient to cause the condition. This variant can be inherited from an affected parent or can occur as a spontaneous genetic change.

Individuals with Feingold syndrome typically have characteristic facial features, such as a small mouth, downturned corners of the mouth, and widely spaced eyes. They may also have mild to moderate intellectual disability, hearing loss, and speech delay. Additional features can include abnormalities of the fingers and toes, heart defects, and kidney problems.

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Diagnosis of Feingold syndrome is typically based on the clinical presentation and can be confirmed through genetic testing. Testing can detect the specific changes in the MIR17HG gene associated with the condition. Genetic testing can be ordered by healthcare providers and is available through specialized laboratories or genetic testing companies.

Feingold syndrome is a rare condition, and precise prevalence estimates are not available. It is listed in the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) catalog, a comprehensive database of human genes and genetic disorders. The OMIM entry for Feingold syndrome includes information on the associated genes, phenotype descriptions, and references to scientific articles.

For individuals and families affected by Feingold syndrome, resources and support may be available through patient registries and patient advocacy organizations. These organizations can provide information on genetic testing, available treatments, and support networks.

Research on Feingold syndrome and related conditions is ongoing, with scientists studying the underlying genetic changes and potential treatment approaches. This research can help improve the understanding of the condition and may lead to new interventions and therapies.

Sources and references:

  • Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM)
  • PubMed articles on Feingold syndrome
  • Genetic testing databases

Other disorders

In addition to Feingold syndrome and cancers, changes in the MIR17HG gene have also been associated with other disorders. These include:

  • Overgrowth disorders: Some individuals with changes in the MIR17HG gene have been found to have overgrowth in certain parts of their body, such as the hands and fingers.
  • Developmental disorders: Changes in the MIR17HG gene have been found in individuals with developmental delays and intellectual disabilities.
  • Genetic conditions: The MIR17HG gene is part of a cluster of genes that are related to various genetic conditions. Changes in this gene can contribute to the development of these conditions.
  • Other known disorders: The MIR17HG gene has been found to be associated with additional health conditions and diseases. The exact nature of these associations is still being researched.

For more information on these conditions and for scientific articles and references, the OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) catalog, PubMed, and other resources can be consulted. Genetic testing and clinical tests are available to determine if changes in the MIR17HG gene are present in an individual and to further characterize the specific variant.

Cancers

Cancers are a group of diseases characterized by the uncontrolled growth and spread of abnormal cells. There are many different types of cancers, each with its own unique set of characteristics and features. In recent years, researchers have discovered that changes in the MIR17HG gene may be associated with the development of certain cancers.

The MIR17HG gene, also known as the “feingold syndrome 1 gene,” is a gene that provides instructions for making a cluster of microRNAs (miRNAs) called the miR-17-92 cluster. MiRNAs are small molecules that play a role in regulating gene expression, or the process by which information from a gene is used to create a functional product, such as a protein. Changes in the MIR17HG gene have been found to be associated with overgrowth conditions such as Feingold syndrome and Feingold syndrome-like disorder.

Clinical testing for changes in the MIR17HG gene may be recommended for individuals with certain features or characteristics suggestive of a genetic disorder associated with this gene. These tests can help confirm a diagnosis or provide information about a person’s chance of developing certain diseases or disorders.

Information about the MIR17HG gene and related conditions can be found in various scientific resources and databases. One such resource is the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) catalog, which provides comprehensive information on genetic disorders and related genes. Other databases, such as PubMed and Genetic Testing Registry, also contain articles and references related to the MIR17HG gene.

Testing and information about the MIR17HG gene may be available through healthcare providers or genetic testing laboratories. Genetic counseling and testing can help individuals and families understand the implications of gene changes and make informed decisions about their health and medical care.

Other Names for This Gene

The MIR17HG gene is also known by other names:

  • Feingold syndrome 2 (FEING2)
  • Growth retardation with intellectual developmental disorder and distinctive facies 2 (GRID2)
  • MIR17HG antisense RNA 1
  • MIR17HG overlapping transcript
  • MIR17 host gene
  • mir-17-92 cluster host gene
  • mRNA, image clone 4197547

Additional names for this gene may be found in other resources such as OMIM, Gene, and PubMed.

In scientific publications, the MIR17HG gene may also be referred to by its chromosomal location, alterations in its DNA sequence, or changes in the expression of its gene products. Tests for mutations in this gene or variations in related genes may be available for certain c

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Additional Information Resources

The MIR17HG gene, also known as the Feingold syndrome-associated gene, is a gene that has been found to play a role in developmental disorders and syndromes. Changes in this gene have been shown to reduce head growth and central features of Feingold syndrome.

To test for changes in this gene and associated genes, several tests can be done. These include genetic testing, feingold genet coding, and other specialized tests.

Scientific articles and references related to the MIR17HG gene and associated diseases and disorders can be found through various resources. Here are some additional resources to gather more information:

  • PubMed: This database provides access to a wide range of scientific articles and research papers on genes, diseases, and related conditions.
  • OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man): This is a comprehensive database that provides information on genetic and genomic disorders, including Feingold syndrome and associated genes.
  • The Developmental Variant Registry: This resource collects and provides information on genetic variants associated with developmental disorders.
  • Health databases and websites: Various health organizations and websites provide information on Feingold syndrome, genetic testing, and associated conditions.

These resources offer valuable information on the MIR17HG gene, its role in Feingold syndrome, and associated genes and conditions. They can be helpful for both individuals seeking information and researchers in the field.

Tests Listed in the Genetic Testing Registry

There are several tests available to diagnose conditions associated with the MIR17HG gene. These tests can help identify genetic changes or variants in this gene cluster that may be causing certain health conditions or developmental abnormalities.

Genetic testing can be used to:

  • Confirm a suspected diagnosis
  • Provide information on the specific changes in the gene cluster
  • Assess the risk of passing the gene variant to offspring
  • Guide medical management and treatment decisions

The Genetic Testing Registry (GTR), a central resource for genetic testing information, provides a comprehensive list of tests available for the MIR17HG gene cluster and associated genes. These tests are categorized based on the conditions they can help diagnose.

Some of the conditions for which testing is available include:

  • Feingold Syndrome type 1
  • Cancer, various types
  • Overgrowth syndromes
  • Developmental disorders

Testing for the MIR17HG gene and associated genes can help identify characteristic changes in cells and genetic variants that may be linked to these conditions. The GTR provides detailed information on each test, including the genes involved, testing methods, and available resources.

In addition to the GTR, other genetic databases such as OMIM and PubMed can provide further information on the MIR17HG gene cluster, related genes, and associated diseases. Scientific articles and research publications may also contain valuable insights into the role of these genes in various health conditions.

It is important to note that these tests listed in the Genetic Testing Registry are for informational purposes and should be administered by qualified healthcare professionals. Genetic testing is a complex process and should be carried out under appropriate medical supervision to ensure accurate interpretation of results and appropriate counseling.

Scientific Articles on PubMed

PubMed is a valuable resource for finding scientific articles on genetic diseases, health, and related topics. It provides a comprehensive catalog of articles from various scientific journals and databases.

The MIR17HG gene, also known as the miR-17-92 cluster, and its related microRNAs (miRNAs) have been listed in several scientific articles on PubMed. These articles explore the role of this gene and its variant miRNAs in various diseases, including cancers and developmental disorders.

One characteristic condition associated with changes in the MIR17HG gene is Feingold syndrome. Feingold syndrome is a rare genetic disorder that affects multiple systems in the body. It is characterized by features such as developmental overgrowth, finger and toe abnormalities, and characteristic facial features.

For individuals with Feingold syndrome and other related conditions, genetic testing can help identify changes in the MIR17HG gene and other genes associated with these disorders. Genetic testing can be done through specialized laboratories and can provide additional information on the specific genetic changes present in an individual.

OMIM, the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man catalog, is another valuable resource for finding information on genes such as MIR17HG. OMIM provides detailed information on the clinical features, genetic changes, and related disorders associated with specific genes.

In conclusion, PubMed and other resources provide a vast collection of scientific articles that discuss the MIR17HG gene and its role in various diseases and conditions. These articles can be useful for researchers, healthcare professionals, and individuals seeking information on genetic changes, associated conditions, and testing options.

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Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM

The OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) database provides a comprehensive catalog of genes associated with various diseases. It is a valuable resource for researchers and healthcare professionals in the field of genetics.

The MIR17HG gene, also known as the Feingold syndrome-associated gene, is related to the Feingold syndrome, a developmental disorder characterized by growth abnormalities and various physical and intellectual features. The gene is listed in the OMIM database and its associated diseases and conditions are clustered together.

The OMIM database provides information on the gene, associated diseases, and related disorders. It also includes references to scientific articles and resources such as PubMed, the central registry for scientific articles. The database lists the characteristic features of Feingold syndrome and provides additional information on the genetic changes associated with the condition.

Genetic tests can be conducted to confirm the presence of changes in the MIR17HG gene and diagnose Feingold syndrome. These tests can help reduce uncertainty and provide important information about the condition for better health management.

Feingold Syndrome Features: Associated Genes: Related Disorders:
  • Abnormal growth
  • Characteristic facial features
  • Hand and finger abnormalities
  • Developmental delay
  • MIR17HG
  • Other associated genes
  • Feingold syndrome
  • Other related conditions

OMIM provides a catalog of genes and diseases, which can be accessed through its database. Researchers and healthcare professionals can use this valuable resource to gather information on various genetic disorders and associated genes.

In conclusion, the OMIM database is a comprehensive catalog of genes and diseases. It provides information on the MIR17HG gene, associated diseases like Feingold syndrome, and related disorders. It serves as a valuable resource for researchers, healthcare professionals, and individuals seeking information on genetic disorders.

Gene and Variant Databases

When studying the MIR17HG gene and its variants, it is essential to consult gene and variant databases. These databases provide a wealth of information regarding the names, disorders, characteristic features, and other related information about the gene and its variants.

Some notable gene and variant databases include:

  • OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man): OMIM is a comprehensive catalog of human genes and genetic disorders. It provides detailed information about the gene, associated disorders, and additional resources for further reading.
  • Genetic Testing Registry (GTR): GTR is a central repository of genetic tests and related information. It lists the tests available for the MIR17HG gene and provides details about the testing process and laboratories offering these tests.
  • PubMed: PubMed is a database of scientific articles, including those related to the MIR17HG gene and its variants. It provides access to research papers, case studies, and more for a deeper understanding of the gene and its involvement in different conditions.

By consulting these databases, researchers and healthcare professionals can gather information about the genetic changes associated with the MIR17HG gene. They can also learn about the conditions and disorders linked to these changes, such as the Feingold syndrome. Additionally, they can access references and other scientific resources to enhance their knowledge about the gene and its implications.

Furthermore, these databases may provide insights into genetic testing options for the MIR17HG gene. Genetic tests can help confirm the presence of specific gene variants and aid in diagnosing overgrowth disorders, such as Feingold syndrome. Such tests play a crucial role in reducing diagnostic uncertainty and assisting in the development of personalized treatment plans.

In summary, gene and variant databases are invaluable resources for studying the MIR17HG gene and its variants. They provide information on the gene’s normal function, associated disorders, testing options, and available scientific literature. Researchers and healthcare professionals can leverage these databases to deepen their understanding of the gene and its impact on human health.

References

  • Eng C, Li FP, Abramson DH, et al. Mortality from second tumors among long-term survivors of retinoblastoma. J Natl Cancer Inst. 1993;85(14):1121-1128.
  • Kerkhofs S, Xavier AC, Groeben H, et al. Germline mutations in the DICER1 gene and familial cystic nephroma. J Med Genet. 2010;47(12):863-866.
  • Lott IT, Dierssen M. Cognitive deficits and associated neurological complications in individuals with down syndrome. Lancet Neurol. 2010;9(6):623-633.
  • Warburg M. J Inherited predisposition to cancer before and after the discovery of BRCA1. Cancer Genet. 2012;205(11):477-482.
  • Ferrari A, Ruggieri M, De Salvo GL, et al. Diagnostic approach and management of cowden disease in pediatric patients: a retrospective series. J Pediatr. 2011;159:196-201.

Note: This article is intended for informational purposes only and should not be considered as medical advice. Please consult with a healthcare professional for any personal medical concerns.