Mitomycin

Mitomycin can cause a severe decrease in the number of blood cells in your bone marrow. This may cause certain symptoms and may increase the risk that you will develop a serious infection or bleeding. If you experience any of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately: fever, sore throat, ongoing cough and congestion, or other signs of infection; unusual bleeding or bruising.

Mitomycin may cause hemolytic uremic syndrome (a potentially life-threatening condition that involves injury to red blood cells, causing anemia and kidney problems). If you experience any of the following symptoms, tell your doctor immediately: red or bloody stools or diarrhea; decreased urination; swelling of the face, arms, hands, feet, ankles, or lower legs; or unusual tiredness or weakness.

Keep all appointments with your doctor and the laboratory. Your doctor will order certain tests before and during your treatment to see if it is safe for you to receive mitomycin injection and to check your body’s response to mitomycin injection.

Mitomycin injection must be given in a hospital or medical facility under the supervision of a doctor who is experienced in giving chemotherapy medications for cancer.

🔔 Why is this medication prescribed?

Mitomycin is used in combination with other medications to treat cancer of the stomach or pancreas that has spread to other parts of the body and has not improved or worsened after treatment with other medications, surgery, or radiation therapy. Mitomycin is a type of antibiotic that is only used in cancer chemotherapy. It slows or stops the growth of cancer cells in your body.

🔔 How should this medicine be used?

Mitomycin comes as a powder to be mixed with liquid and injected intravenously (into a vein) by a doctor or nurse in a medical facility. It is usually injected once every 6 to 8 weeks.

Long wait times are often cited as a downfall of universal healthcare systems, but wait times in America have reached a new high, too. The average time to make a physician appointment as a new patient in 15 major U.S. cities is now 24 days, up 30% in just 3 years (2014 to 2018) according to physician recruiting firm Merritt Hawkins.

Your doctor may need to delay your treatment or change your dose if you experience certain side effects. It is important for you to tell your doctor how you are feeling during your treatment with mitomycin injection.

Ask your pharmacist or doctor for a copy of the manufacturer’s information for the patient.

🔔 Other uses for this medicine

Mitomycin is also sometimes used to treat anal cancer (cancer that begins in the anus), cervical cancer, a type of lung cancer (non-small cell lung cancer; NSCLC), and malignant mesothelioma (cancer in the lining of the chest or abdomen). Mitomycin is also sometimes used intravesically (infused directly into the bladder) to treat bladder cancer. Talk to your doctor about the risks of using this medication for your condition.

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This medication may be prescribed for other uses; ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

🔔 What special precautions should I follow?

Before receiving mitomycin,

  • tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to mitomycin, any other medications, or any of the ingredients in mitomycin injection. Ask your pharmacist for a list of the ingredients.
  • tell your doctor and pharmacist what other prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking or plan to take. Be sure to mention if you have every received doxorubicin (Adriamycin, Rubex). Your doctor may need to monitor you carefully for side effects.
  • tell your doctor if you have a blood or bleeding disorder or if you recently noticed any unusual bruising or bleeding. Your doctor may not want you to receive mitomycin injection.
  • tell your doctor if you have or have ever had kidney disease.
  • tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. You should not breast-feed during your treatment with mitomycin.

🔔 What special dietary instructions should I follow?

Unless your doctor tells you otherwise, continue your normal diet.