Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) is a rare genetic condition that causes the development of tumors in multiple endocrine glands. It is classified into two subtypes, MEN1 and MEN2, and each subtype is associated with specific genes and inheritance patterns.

MEN1, also known as Wermer syndrome, is caused by mutations in the MEN1 gene and is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. This condition primarily affects the parathyroid glands, pancreas, and pituitary gland, leading to the development of tumors in these organs. Patients with MEN1 may also develop tumors in other endocrine glands, such as the adrenal glands and thyroid gland.

MEN2, on the other hand, is caused by mutations in the RET gene and has two main subtypes: MEN2A and MEN2B. MEN2A is characterized by the development of tumors in the thyroid gland, parathyroid glands, and adrenal glands. MEN2B, on the other hand, is associated with the development of tumors in the adrenal glands, thyroid gland, and other tissues, such as the mucous membranes and intestines.

Diagnosis of MEN typically involves a combination of clinical evaluations, genetic testing, and imaging studies. Treatment options for MEN vary depending on the specific neoplasia present and may include surgical removal of tumors, hormone replacement therapy, and other targeted therapies.

Overall, multiple endocrine neoplasia is a complex and rare condition that requires a multidisciplinary approach to diagnosis and management. Research into the genetic causes and underlying mechanisms of MEN is ongoing, with clinical trials and genetic studies providing valuable information for healthcare professionals and patients alike.

Frequency

The frequency of multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) types 1, 2A, and 4 in the general population is relatively rare.

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MEN type 1 (MEN1), also known as Wermer syndrome, occurs in about 1 in 30,000 individuals. MEN1 is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, which means that individuals with a mutation in the MEN1 gene have a 50% chance of passing the condition on to each of their children.

MEN type 2A (MEN2A) occurs in about 1 in 35,000 individuals. Like MEN1, MEN2A is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. The majority of cases of MEN2A are caused by mutations in the RET gene.

MEN type 4 (MEN4) is extremely rare, with only a few families reported in the scientific literature. It is also inherited in an autosomal dominant manner.

These frequencies are estimates and may vary depending on the population studied and the diagnostic criteria used. Additional cases of MEN, particularly MEN2B and other MEN subtypes, may occur that have yet to be identified or reported.

For more detailed information on the frequency of specific types of MEN, the Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia overview article in GeneReviews1 provides a comprehensive review of the available scientific literature.

The MEN1 gene provides instructions for making a protein called menin, which is involved in the regulation of gene expression and the control of cell growth and division. Mutations in this gene impair the function of menin, leading to the development of multiple tumors in the endocrine system.

Other genes, such as CDKN1B, have also been associated with the development of tumors in individuals with MEN1-like symptoms but without mutations in the MEN1 gene.

Testing for mutations in the MEN1 and RET genes is available on a clinical basis. Genetic testing can help confirm a diagnosis of MEN and identify family members who may be at risk.

ClinicalTrials.gov provides a list of clinical trials related to multiple endocrine neoplasia that are currently recruiting patients or may be of interest. You can find this information by searching for “multiple endocrine neoplasia” at clinicaltrials.gov.

The OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) catalog of human genes and genetic disorders provides more information on the inherited basis of multiple endocrine neoplasia. You can find this information at omim.org.

Support and advocacy groups for individuals with multiple endocrine neoplasia and their families can provide additional resources and information. Some examples include the Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Research and Education Foundation (MENREF) and the Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia International Research and Support Foundation (MENIRSF).

Overall, the frequency of multiple endocrine neoplasia types 1, 2A, and 4 is relatively rare, but further research and genetic studies are ongoing to learn more about the causes and inheritance patterns of these conditions.

Causes

The underlying causes of Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia (MEN) are genetic mutations that affect the function of various endocrine glands. There are several types of MEN, including MEN1, MEN2A, MEN2B, and MEN4. These conditions are relatively rare and occur as a result of mutations in specific genes.

MEN1 is primarily caused by mutations in the MEN1 gene, while MEN2A and MEN2B are associated with mutations in the RET gene. MEN4, on the other hand, is caused by mutations in the CDKN1B gene. These genetic mutations can be inherited from one or both parents, or they can occur spontaneously.

The specific genes that are mutated in MEN are responsible for controlling cell division and growth. When these genes are mutated, they can trigger the growth of tumors in multiple endocrine glands, such as the thyroid, parathyroid, and adrenal glands. These tumors can be benign or malignant.

The frequency of these genetic mutations varies among the different types of MEN. For example, mutations in the MEN1 gene are relatively common, occurring in about 80% of MEN1 cases. On the other hand, mutations in the CDKN1B gene are rare, accounting for only a small percentage of MEN4 cases.

Additional information on the genetic causes of MEN can be found in the Genereviews and OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) databases, as well as scientific articles and publications on PubMed.

In order to diagnose MEN and determine the specific genetic mutations involved, genetic testing may be performed. This can help in confirming the diagnosis and assessing the risk of developing associated tumors.

Patients with MEN can find support, advocacy, and resources from organizations such as the Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia (MEN) Support and Advocacy Center and the MEN4 Global Registry and International Patient Advocacy Group. These organizations provide information, support groups, and access to clinical trials for individuals with MEN.

Learn more about the genes associated with Multiple endocrine neoplasia

Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) is a rare genetic condition that affects the cells and tissues of multiple endocrine glands. There are several genes associated with different types of MEN, including MEN1 and MEN4.

The MEN1 gene is the most commonly mutated gene in cases of multiple endocrine neoplasia. Mutations in this gene can cause the development of tumors in the pituitary gland, parathyroid glands, and pancreas. The MEN1 gene is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, meaning that an individual with a mutated copy of the gene has a 50% chance of passing it on to their children.

Research has shown that mutations in the MEN1 gene can also be associated with other conditions, such as familial isolated primary hyperparathyroidism and familial pituitary tumors. These conditions are characterized by the development of tumors in the parathyroid glands and pituitary gland, respectively.

See also  PNPLA2 gene

The MEN4 gene is another gene associated with multiple endocrine neoplasia. Mutations in this gene can cause the development of tumors in the parathyroid glands, thyroid gland, and neuroendocrine pancreatic tumors. However, the frequency of MEN4 is relatively low compared to MEN1.

To learn more about the genes associated with multiple endocrine neoplasia, you can visit the Genereviews website or search for articles on PubMed. These resources provide valuable information about the genetic causes, inheritance patterns, and clinical features of multiple endocrine neoplasia.

For example, the Genereviews entry on MEN1 provides detailed information about the condition, its genetic cause, inheritance patterns, and management options. The entry also includes references to research articles and other sources for further reading.

In addition, organizations like the Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Research and Advocacy (MENRA) Center and the Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia International Federation (MENIF) provide support and information for patients and their families affected by multiple endocrine neoplasia. These organizations are dedicated to raising awareness, promoting research, and improving the lives of individuals with this rare genetic condition.

Inheritance

Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) is a group of rare genetic disorders that can occur within families. There are several types of MEN, including MEN1, MEN2A, MEN2B, MEN4, and MENX. These conditions are inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern, meaning that individuals with just one copy of the mutated gene have a 50% chance of passing it on to each of their children.

For example, MEN1 is caused by mutations in the MEN1 gene, while MEN2A and MEN2B are caused by mutations in the RET gene. MEN4 is associated with mutations in the CDKN1B gene. The specific genes associated with MENX have not yet been identified.

Individuals with MEN may develop multiple tumors in various endocrine glands, including the pituitary gland, thyroid gland, and adrenal glands. These tumors can be controlled with proper medical management, but they may cause hormonal imbalances, leading to symptoms such as hormonal deficiencies or overproduction.

It is important for individuals with MEN to receive regular clinical and genetic testing to monitor for the development and growth of tumors, as well as to determine appropriate treatment and management plans. Genetic testing can also be used to identify affected family members and provide them with support and information.

There are several resources available for individuals and families affected by MEN, including advocacy and support groups, research centers, and scientific articles. The National Institutes of Health’s Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) provides information about the different types of MEN, their causes, and inheritance patterns. GARD also provides references to clinical trials and research studies that may be of interest to patients and families.

Additional resources for information on MEN include the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) catalog, which provides detailed information about the genes and associated diseases, as well as PubMed, which contains scientific articles on MEN and related topics.

In conclusion, multiple endocrine neoplasia is a group of rare genetic disorders that can occur within families. These conditions are caused by mutations in specific genes and are inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern. Regular clinical and genetic testing is important for managing and monitoring the condition, and there are resources available to support individuals and families affected by MEN.

Other Names for This Condition

  • Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia (MEN)
  • MEN syndromes
  • MEN 1
  • MEN 2
  • MEN 4
  • Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1
  • Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2
  • Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 4
  • Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Syndrome

Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia (MEN) refers to a group of rare inherited disorders that are characterized by the development of tumors in multiple endocrine glands. There are several types of MEN, including MEN 1, MEN 2, and MEN 4, each of which is caused by mutations in different genes.

MEN 1 is caused by mutations in the MEN1 gene, MEN 2 is caused by mutations in the RET gene, and MEN 4 is caused by mutations in the CDKN1B gene. These mutations affect the normal function of the endocrine glands and can lead to the development of cancer in these tissues.

Patients with MEN may develop tumors in various endocrine glands, including the pituitary gland, thyroid gland, parathyroid glands, and adrenal glands. The frequency and types of tumors can vary depending on the specific type of MEN syndrome.

Additional information about MEN can be found in scientific articles, as well as in resources such as OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man), GeneReviews®, PubMed, and ClinicalTrials.gov. These resources provide information about the clinical features, inheritance patterns, genetic testing, and treatment options for individuals with MEN.

Support and advocacy organizations, such as the Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Research and Support (MEN-RS) Center, provide resources and support for patients and families affected by MEN. These organizations offer information about the condition, access to current research studies, and support networks for individuals living with MEN.

In summary, Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia is a rare condition that can cause the development of tumors in multiple endocrine glands. It is caused by mutations in specific genes and can lead to the development of cancer in these tissues. Understanding the genetic causes and clinical features of MEN is important for accurate diagnosis, genetic testing, and appropriate management of affected individuals.

Additional Information Resources

Here are some additional resources for you to learn more about Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia:

  • Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM): OMIM provides a comprehensive catalog of human genes and genetic disorders, with a focus on rare conditions like Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia. You can find more information about the genes associated with MEN, their inheritance patterns, and clinical descriptions.
  • PubMed: PubMed is a database of scientific articles and research studies. You can search for articles related to Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia and explore the latest studies conducted on this condition.
  • GeneReviews®: GeneReviews is a comprehensive resource that provides expert-authored, peer-reviewed information about genetic disorders. The MEN section covers different types of MEN, their genetic causes, clinical features, and management options.
  • Thyroid Cancer Survivors’ Association (THANC): THANC is an advocacy organization that provides support and information to thyroid cancer patients and their families. They have resources specific to Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia and can help connect you with other individuals facing the same condition.
  • Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Research Foundation (MENRF): MENRF is a non-profit organization dedicated to advancing research on MEN and supporting patients and families affected by this condition. Their website offers information on MEN, ongoing studies, and opportunities to participate in clinical trials.
  • ClinicalTrials.gov: ClinicalTrials.gov is a registry and database of clinical trials around the world. You can search for ongoing or completed trials related to Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia and see if you or your loved ones are eligible to participate.

These resources will provide you with additional information, support, and research on Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia. Remember to consult with healthcare professionals for personalized advice and guidance regarding your specific condition.

Genetic Testing Information

Genetic testing for multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) includes the identification of specific genes associated with the condition. There are different types of MEN, each affecting different tissues and organs in the body.

The main genes involved in MEN are MEN1 and MEN2. MEN1 is associated with MEN type 1, which primarily affects the parathyroid gland, pancreas, and pituitary gland. On the other hand, MEN2 is associated with MEN type 2 and mainly affects the thyroid gland and adrenal medulla.

See also  GM1 gangliosidosis

Genetic testing for MEN can be performed in specialized genetic testing centers, where clinicians and geneticists analyze the patient’s DNA for mutations in the MEN genes. These centers provide comprehensive information about the genetic testing process and its implications for the individual and their family.

Genetic testing can help determine the inheritance pattern of MEN, which is usually autosomal dominant. This means that individuals carrying a mutated MEN gene have a 50% chance of passing it on to their children.

Identifying mutations in the MEN genes is crucial for understanding the underlying causes of the condition and can help in the management and treatment of MEN. For example, identifying mutations in the MEN1 gene can indicate a higher risk for developing certain types of cancer, such as pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

Several scientific studies and clinical trials have been conducted to study the function of MEN genes and their role in triggering MEN. These studies contribute to the growing body of knowledge on MEN and aid in developing better diagnostic and treatment strategies.

For patients and families affected by MEN, genetic testing provides valuable information about the condition, its inheritance pattern, and the risk of developing associated endocrine tumors. This information enables individuals to make informed decisions about their health and seek appropriate medical care.

Resources and support for individuals and families affected by MEN are available through organizations and advocacy groups, such as the Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Genetic Research and Information Center (GENETICS), the MEN Support and Advocacy Group (MENSA), and MEN patient support groups.

For more information on genetic testing for MEN and related resources, refer to the following references:

  1. Thakker RV. Multiple endocrine neoplasia. Lancet. 2004; 364(9448):1844-1854. PubMed
  2. Gripp KW. Tumor predisposition in Costello syndrome. Am J Med Genet C Semin Med Genet. 2005; 137C(1):72-77. PubMed
  3. MEN Syndromes: Types, Causes, and Control. National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD). Link
  4. MEN1 – Multiple endocrine neoplasia I. OMIM. Link
  5. MEN2A, MEN2B, and FMTC. GeneReviews. Link
  6. ClinicalTrials.gov. Search results for “multiple endocrine neoplasia”. Link

Disclaimer: The information provided here is for educational purposes only and should not be considered as medical advice. Genetic testing and medical decisions should be made in consultation with a healthcare professional.

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center

The Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) is a resource provided by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) that aims to provide information and support for individuals and families affected by genetic and rare diseases. GARD serves as a central repository for reliable and up-to-date information on various rare diseases, including multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN).

MEN is a rare genetic condition characterized by the development of tumors in multiple endocrine glands. There are different subtypes of MEN, including MEN1, MEN2A, MEN2B, and MEN4, each associated with specific genes and tumor types. GARD provides information on the genetic causes, clinical features, inheritance patterns, and frequency of these subtypes.

For individuals with MEN and their families, GARD offers resources to learn about the condition, including articles, references, and scientific studies. GARD also provides information on clinical trials and research studies that are investigating potential treatments or management strategies for MEN.

GARD offers a wide range of resources to support individuals with MEN and their families. These resources include information on genetic testing, hormone function testing, and treatment options for specific tumor types. GARD also provides information on managing the symptoms and complications of MEN, as well as resources for finding healthcare providers and support groups.

In addition to GARD, there are other resources available for individuals and families affected by MEN. The Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network (RDCRN) is a network of research and clinical centers that conduct studies on rare diseases, including MEN. The National Institutes of Health’s PubMed database also provides access to scientific articles and research studies on MEN and related conditions.

Overall, GARD is a valuable resource for individuals and families seeking reliable information and support for rare genetic diseases, including multiple endocrine neoplasia. By providing access to scientific research, clinical information, and resources for support, GARD aims to empower individuals and help them make informed decisions about their health and well-being.

Patient Support and Advocacy Resources

When it comes to a complex condition like Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia (MEN), patients and their families need access to reliable information, support, and advocacy resources. Understanding the triggers, inheritance patterns, and causes of this rare disease can help patients make informed decisions about their condition and treatment options.

One example of a resource that provides valuable information on MEN is OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man). OMIM is a comprehensive catalog of human genes and genetic disorders. It offers detailed information on the genetic causes of MEN and other rare diseases, including the genes cdkn1b and men4. Patients can access OMIM online to learn more about their specific condition and find support resources.

For clinical information on MEN, patients can consult Genereviews®. Genereviews® is an online resource that provides expert-authored, peer-reviewed articles on genetic diseases. It covers various types of multiple endocrine neoplasia and offers comprehensive information on diagnosis, management, and genetic testing options.

The Gripp Research Center for Endocrinology and Metabolism is another valuable resource for patients with MEN. The center focuses on research, diagnosis, and treatment of rare endocrine diseases. Patients can find information on clinical trials, support groups, and the latest advancements in MEN research.

In addition to these resources, there are various patient support and advocacy organizations that provide assistance to individuals and families affected by multiple endocrine neoplasia. These organizations offer support networks, educational materials, and resources for coping with the challenges of this condition.

Some of the notable organizations include:

  • Thyroid Cancer Survivors’ Association (THYCA): THYCA is a nonprofit organization that aims to support survivors of thyroid cancer and their families. They provide resources, information, and support groups for individuals with MEN-related thyroid cancer.
  • The Pituitary Network Association: The Pituitary Network Association is dedicated to raising awareness, promoting research, and providing support for individuals with pituitary gland disorders. They offer educational materials, online support groups, and a helpline for patients with MEN-associated pituitary tumors.
  • The Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Research Foundation (MENRF): MENRF is a nonprofit organization focused on advancing research and raising awareness about multiple endocrine neoplasia. The foundation provides information, resources, and funding for cutting-edge research projects.

Patients can also access additional resources and information through databases like PubMed and ClinicalTrials.gov. PubMed offers a vast collection of medical research articles related to multiple endocrine neoplasia, while ClinicalTrials.gov provides information on ongoing clinical trials and research studies.

Overall, these patient support and advocacy resources play a vital role in empowering individuals with multiple endocrine neoplasia. By offering information, support networks, and access to the latest research, these resources help patients and their families navigate the complexities of this rare condition.

Research Studies from ClinicalTrialsgov

ClinicalTrials.gov is a platform that provides information about ongoing and completed clinical trials. These studies aim to further our understanding of different medical conditions and explore potential treatments. Here, we discuss some of the research studies related to Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia (MEN) that are listed on ClinicalTrials.gov.

MEN is a genetic condition that affects the endocrine system, which is responsible for producing hormones. There are different types of MEN, including MEN1 and MEN4. These conditions are relatively rare, and they are inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, meaning that a mutated gene from one parent can cause the condition to appear.

See also  Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome

A study titled “Genetic Causes of MEN and Other Endocrine Conditions” is investigating the genetic factors associated with MEN. Researchers are focusing on identifying the genes involved in the development of MEN, particularly genes such as MEN1 and CDKN1B, which may play a role in regulating cell growth and division. By understanding how these genes function and how their mutations can lead to the development of MEN, scientists hope to gain insights into potential treatment options.

Another research study titled “Clinical and Genetic Studies of MEN Syndrome” aims to explore the clinical features and genetic variations associated with different types of MEN. Researchers are analyzing patient data, medical records, and genetic samples to better understand the spectrum of MEN-related diseases. This study may help improve diagnosis, treatment, and genetic counseling for individuals with MEN and their families.

Furthermore, the “Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1 (MEN1) Research Resource” is a comprehensive catalog of MEN1-related articles, publications, and scientific literature. This resource serves as a central hub for researchers and clinicians interested in studying MEN1. It provides information on the various manifestations of MEN1 and how it can affect different endocrine glands, such as the thyroid and pituitary gland. This resource supports ongoing research and promotes collaboration within the scientific community.

In summary, ongoing research studies listed on ClinicalTrials.gov are focused on understanding the causes, inheritance patterns, and potential treatment options for Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia. These studies allow researchers to learn more about this complex condition and provide valuable information to healthcare professionals and patients. For additional information and references on Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia, the Genereviewsr, OMIM, and PubMed databases are commonly used resources.

Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM

The Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM is a valuable resource for gathering information about multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN). MEN is a group of rare genetic disorders that can cause tumors in multiple endocrine glands. There are several types of MEN, including MEN1, MEN2A, and MEN2B.

MEN1 occurs with a frequency of approximately 1 in 30,000 individuals. For example, mutations in the CDKN1B gene can cause MEN4, a rare subtype of MEN1. The Genereviews.org website provides detailed articles about various types of MEN, including MEN1 and MEN2.

Patients with MEN may experience a variety of symptoms depending on the specific genes that are mutated. Some common symptoms include tumors in the pituitary gland, thyroid gland, and parathyroid glands. Rare MEN syndromes can also affect other tissues and organs.

There are several resources available to support patients with MEN and their families. The MEN advocacy group is associated with the Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Research and Support Network (MEN RSN). The ClinicalTrials.gov website provides information about ongoing research studies related to MEN.

To diagnose MEN, genetic testing is often required. Additional testing may be necessary to determine the specific gene mutation associated with the condition. The OMIM database, created by Dr. Victor A. McKusick, provides detailed information about the genes associated with MEN and their function.

Currently, there is no cure for MEN and treatment options focus on controlling the symptoms and preventing complications. For example, surgery may be performed to remove tumors or hormone replacement therapy may be used to restore hormonal balance.

The Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM is a central repository of information about MEN and other genetic disorders. It provides a comprehensive list of genes associated with MEN and their inheritance patterns. The names of the genes are linked to detailed descriptions of their function and the diseases they can cause.

References:

  1. Thakker RV. Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1. In: Pagon RA, Adam MP, Ardinger HH, et al., editors. GeneReviews® [Internet]. Seattle (WA): University of Washington, Seattle; 1993-2021. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK1538/
  2. Pagon RA, et al. (2001). Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2b. In: GeneReviews® [Internet]. Seattle (WA): University of Washington, Seattle; 1993-2021. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK1257/
  3. Pagon RA, Adam MP, Ardinger HH, et al., editors. GeneReviews® [Internet]. Seattle (WA): University of Washington, Seattle; 1993-2021. Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2a. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK1252/
  4. OMIM – Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man. Retrieved from https://www.omim.org/
  5. McKusick VA. Mendelian Inheritance in Man and its online version, OMIM. Am J Hum Genet. 2007;80(4):588-604.

Scientific Articles on PubMed

There are numerous scientific articles available on PubMed that provide valuable information on multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) and related topics. MEN is a rare condition that causes tumors to occur in multiple endocrine glands. These articles cover various aspects of MEN, including its causes, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment options.

Here are some resources on PubMed that you can find articles about MEN and related conditions:

  • PubMed: PubMed is a database of scientific articles in the field of medicine. It contains a vast collection of articles on MEN and related topics, including endocrinology, genetics, and oncology. You can search for specific articles using keywords such as “multiple endocrine neoplasia” or “MEN.”
  • OMIM: OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) is a catalog of human genes and genetic disorders. It provides comprehensive information on MEN and other inherited conditions. You can find articles on MEN by searching for the condition in the OMIM database.
  • ClinicalTrials.gov: ClinicalTrials.gov is a registry and results database of publicly and privately supported clinical studies. It provides information on ongoing clinical trials related to MEN and its various types. You can find articles on MEN clinical trials and their outcomes on this website.
  • GeneReviews®: GeneReviews® is a comprehensive resource for clinicians and researchers that provides detailed information on genetic disorders. It includes articles on MEN and the genes associated with the condition, such as MEN1 and MEN4. These articles cover the genetic basis of MEN and the inheritance patterns observed in affected families.
  • Center for Information and Study on Clinical Research Participation (CISCRP): CISCRP is an advocacy organization that provides information and support to patients and their families participating in clinical trials. They may have articles on MEN and the experiences of patients who have participated in clinical trials for this condition.

In addition to these resources, you can also refer to scientific articles published in various medical journals. Many studies have been conducted to better understand MEN and its different types, such as MEN1 and MEN2. These articles provide insights into the underlying causes of MEN and how it affects different endocrine glands.

It is important to stay updated with the latest research and findings on MEN to support the clinical management of affected individuals. By learning about the condition and the current advancements in research and testing, healthcare professionals can provide better care and support to patients with MEN.

References

  • Thakker RV. Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) and type 4 (MEN4). In: Adam MP, Ardinger HH, Pagon RA, et al., editors. GeneReviews® [Internet]. Seattle (WA): University of Washington, Seattle; 1993-2020. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK1201/
  • Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia, Type I; MEN1. Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM). Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/omim/131100
  • Gripp KW. Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1/Type 2. In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2020. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK459228/
  • Bartsch DK, Albers MB, Lopez CL. Surgical treatment of multiple endocrine neoplasia Type 1: state of the art. In: Clinics (Sao Paulo). 2012; 67(Suppl 1): 133-138.
  • Mehrotra P, Hollingsworth AT, Wang Q et al. Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia: A Case Report and Clinical Review. In: J Community Hosp Intern Med Perspect. 2019; 9(1): 55-59.
  • Central Endocrine Neoplasia. Endocrine Genetics and Genomics. Available from: https://www.endocrineweb.com/guides/multiple-endocrine-neoplasia
  • Pituitary Tumors. American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. Available from: https://www.aace.com/publications/guidelines-fact-sheets/pituitary-gland
  • Cancer Information. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Available from: https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/cancer-diagnosis-treatment/types/thyroid-cancer