Myasthenia gravis is a rare autoimmune disease that affects the muscles and movement. It is named after Georges Berrih-Aknin, who was the first to describe this condition in 1992. Myasthenia gravis is caused by the presence of antibodies that interfere with the communication between nerves and muscles, leading to muscle weakness and fatigue. The frequency of myasthenia gravis in the general population is estimated to be around 20 cases per 100,000 people.

Myasthenia gravis can occur at any age, but it is most commonly diagnosed in women under the age of 40 and men over the age of 60. In some cases, the condition can be inherited, with certain genes playing a role in its development. The most important of these genes are the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) and muscle-specific kinase (MuSK) genes.

The exact causes of myasthenia gravis are not yet fully understood. However, research studies suggest that a combination of genetic and environmental factors may contribute to its development. The thymus gland, an important organ of the immune system, is often involved in myasthenia gravis. In some cases, the thymus may be abnormal, and surgical removal of the thymus can lead to improvement in symptoms.

Diagnosis of myasthenia gravis is based on clinical symptoms, a physical examination, and specific tests such as antibody testing, nerve-conduction studies, and electromyography. Treatment options for myasthenia gravis include medications that help to improve muscle strength and reduce the production of antibodies, as well as surgery in certain cases. Ongoing research and clinical trials are aimed at finding new and more effective treatments for this condition.

For additional information on myasthenia gravis, resources and support for patients and their families, as well as scientific articles and studies, the Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America (MGFA) and the Myasthenia Gravis Association (MGA) are valuable sources. The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) catalog also provides information on genes and disorders associated with myasthenic syndromes. Furthermore, the National Institutes of Health’s ClinicalTrials.gov website offers information on current research studies and clinical trials related to myasthenia gravis.

This information is provided for educational purposes only and should not substitute professional medical advice. If you suspect you or a loved one may have myasthenia gravis, please consult a healthcare professional for proper diagnosis and treatment.

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Frequency

The frequency of myasthenia gravis (MG) varies depending on the population being studied and the method of ascertainment. MG has been estimated to affect 14-20 per 100,000 individuals in the general population, making it a relatively rare condition. However, more recent studies suggest that the prevalence of MG may be increasing, especially in older adults.

In certain populations, such as the Moroccan Jewish community, the frequency of MG is much higher. In these populations, it is believed that a specific genetic mutation (known as the “berrih-aknin mutation”) is responsible for a large proportion of MG cases. The berrih-aknin mutation is inherited in an autosomal recessive fashion, which means that individuals must inherit two copies of the mutated gene to develop the condition.

Several studies have reported a higher frequency of MG in women compared to men, although the reasons for this gender disparity are not well understood. Additionally, MG has been found to be more common in individuals of certain ethnic backgrounds, such as those of Ashkenazi Jewish or Chinese descent.

The frequency of MG is also higher in individuals with other autoimmune diseases. For example, approximately 10 percent of individuals with MG have another autoimmune disease, such as rheumatoid arthritis or thyroid disease. This suggests that there may be shared genetic or environmental factors that contribute to the development of both conditions.

With advancements in genetic testing and research, more genes and proteins associated with MG have been identified. For example, mutations in the genes encoding the proteins known as “muscle-specific kinase” (MUSK) and “dok-7” have been found in individuals with MG. This information is important for both scientific research and patient care, as it can help guide diagnosis and treatment decisions.

Resources for individuals with MG and their families include patient advocacy organizations, such as the Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America, which provides information and support. The National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences also provides a list of clinical trials related to MG on their website ClinicalTrials.gov.

References
1. PubMed
2. OMIM – Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man
3. Scientific articles

Causes

  • Myasthenia gravis (MG) is primarily caused by genetic factors.
  • Several genes have been associated with myasthenic syndromes, which are a group of inherited disorders characterized by muscle weakness and fatigability.
  • According to a study published in The New England Journal of Medicine, mutations in the gene encoding the muscle-specific receptor tyrosine kinase (MUSK) are an important cause of congenital myasthenia gravis.
  • There are other genes that are also associated with the inheritance of myasthenia gravis, such as the genes encoding acetylcholine receptor (AChR), rapsyn, and the sodium channel Nav1.4, among others.
  • In some cases, myasthenia gravis may occur without any identifiable genetic cause.
  • In rare cases, myasthenia gravis can be associated with other autoimmune disorders, such as systemic lupus erythematosus or rheumatoid arthritis.
  • A condition called myasthenia gravis-like syndrome can also be caused by certain drugs or exposure to certain chemicals.
  • The thymus, an organ in the chest, plays a role in the development of myasthenia gravis. In some patients, the thymus may produce antibodies that attack proteins involved in neuromuscular transmission.
  • The frequency of myasthenia gravis is higher in women than in men.

Genetic Testing

  • Genetic testing can be performed to identify specific gene mutations associated with myasthenia gravis.
  • Testing is primarily done for research purposes and is not routinely recommended for clinical diagnosis.
  • The Genetic Testing Registry, OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man), and PubMed are resources that provide additional information on genes associated with myasthenia gravis.

Familial Cases

  • In some families, myasthenia gravis is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern, which means an affected individual has a 50% chance of passing the condition on to each of their children.
  • There have been several cases reported where myasthenia gravis runs in families.
  • Family studies and genetic research have helped to identify the genetic factors involved in myasthenia gravis.

Support and Resources

  • Several organizations provide support and resources for individuals and families affected by myasthenia gravis, such as the Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America (MGFA) and the Muscular Dystrophy Association (MDA).
  • These organizations offer educational materials, support groups, clinical trial information, and advocacy for research and treatment of myasthenia gravis.
  • Scientific articles, research studies, and genetic testing information can be found through these organizations and their affiliated medical centers and reference centers.
See also  ELP1 gene

Inheritance

Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a complex genetic disorder that involves the role of multiple genes in its inheritance. Several studies have focused on determining the genes and their inheritance patterns associated with this condition.

Research studies have shown that MG can be inherited in both sporadic and familial cases. Sporadic cases occur in individuals without a family history of the condition, while familial cases involve a family history of MG.

The movement disorder research center OMIM catalog, along with other resources such as PubMed and ClinicalTrials.gov, provides information on the genetic causes of rare diseases including myasthenic syndromes. The OMIM catalog contains a wealth of information on the genes and proteins associated with MG.

One of the most important genes associated with MG is the AChR gene, which codes for the receptors that enable communication between nerves and muscles. Mutations in this gene can lead to a decrease in the number or function of these receptors, resulting in muscle weakness and fatigue.

Another gene involved in MG is the muscle-specific kinase (MUSK) gene. Mutations in this gene affect the formation and stability of neuromuscular junctions, which are essential for proper muscle function.

Studies have also identified the presence of certain antibodies in individuals with MG, such as anti-AChR and anti-MUSK antibodies. These antibodies can attack and damage the AChR and MUSK proteins, leading to muscle weakness.

In addition to the genetic factors, environmental factors may also play a role in the development of MG. Some studies suggest that exposure to certain infections or toxins may trigger the onset of the condition in individuals with a genetic predisposition.

Genetic testing can be helpful in diagnosing MG and identifying specific mutations that may be present in the genes associated with this condition. It can also provide valuable information for family members who may be at risk of developing MG.

Support and advocacy groups, such as the Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America, provide resources and information about MG for patients and their families. They also promote awareness and fund research into the causes and treatments of the condition.

In summary, the inheritance of myasthenia gravis involves the interaction of multiple genes, environmental factors, and immune system abnormalities. Understanding the genetic and environmental factors contributing to MG is important for developing targeted treatments and preventive strategies.

Other Names for This Condition

Some other names for the condition myasthenia gravis include:

  • Myasthenic disorders
  • MG
  • Berrih-Aknin syndrome
  • Panse syndrome

These names are used interchangeably and refer to the same condition. Myasthenia gravis is a rare autoimmune disorder that affects the muscles and is characterized by muscle weakness and fatigue.

It is important to note that myasthenia gravis can have different causes and manifestations in different individuals. Genetic factors play a role in some cases, with certain genes and proteins being implicated in the condition. Research and clinical trials are ongoing to further understand the underlying causes of myasthenia gravis and develop effective treatments.

Some additional resources for information on myasthenia gravis include:

  • The Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America (MGFA)
  • The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)
  • ClinicalTrials.gov, which provides information on ongoing clinical trials related to myasthenia gravis
  • The Myasthenia Gravis Research Center at the University of Minnesota
  • The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) catalog, which provides information on genes, proteins, and disorders with a genetic basis
  • PubMed, where you can find scientific articles and studies on myasthenia gravis

Support and advocacy groups, such as the Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America (MGFA), provide resources and support for patients and their families. These organizations can offer information on managing the condition, finding appropriate healthcare providers, and connecting with others who are affected by myasthenia gravis.

It is worth noting that myasthenia gravis is a relatively rare condition, affecting an estimated 14 to 20 individuals per 100,000 people worldwide. The frequency of myasthenia gravis varies among different populations, with a higher prevalence reported in women and in individuals of Asian, African, and Hispanic descent.

For more information and references about myasthenia gravis, you can consult the scientific articles and studies listed in the sources section below.

Additional Information Resources

  • Scientific Studies: Many scientific studies have been conducted on Myasthenia Gravis. These studies can be found on PubMed.
  • OMIM: The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) catalog provides comprehensive information and references on the genetic disorders associated with Myasthenia Gravis. You can access this catalog here.
  • Frequency of Myasthenia Gravis: Myasthenia Gravis affects approximately 20 out of every 100,000 people worldwide. This frequency may vary in different populations.
  • Musk Antibodies: In some cases of Myasthenia Gravis, antibodies against the muscle-specific kinase (MUSK) protein are present. These antibodies interfere with the signaling between nerves and muscles.
  • Testing for Myasthenia Gravis: Genetic testing can help identify specific genes associated with Myasthenia Gravis. This information can be useful for diagnosis and management of the condition.
  • Support Resources: There are several organizations that provide support and resources for individuals and families affected by Myasthenia Gravis. These include the Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America and the Muscular Dystrophy Association.
  • Clinical Trials: If you are interested in participating in research on Myasthenia Gravis, you can find information on ongoing clinical trials at ClinicalTrials.gov.
  • Thymus Involvement: The thymus gland plays a role in the development of Myasthenia Gravis. In some cases, the thymus may be enlarged or contain abnormal cells.
  • Related Disorders: Myasthenia Gravis shares some common features with other autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and lupus. Understanding these relationships may provide insights into common disease mechanisms.
  • Genetic Inheritance: Myasthenia Gravis can be inherited in an autosomal dominant or recessive manner. Genetic counseling can provide information about the chances of passing the condition on to future generations.

Genetic Testing Information

Introduction

Genetic testing plays an important role in the diagnosis and management of Myasthenia gravis (MG). This condition is characterized by weakness and fatigue in the muscles involved in movement. It is a rare autoimmune condition that can be caused by genetic factors. Genetic testing can provide valuable information about the specific genes and proteins involved in the development of this condition.

Genes and Inheritance

Myasthenia gravis (MG) can have a genetic component, although it can also occur sporadically without any known family history. Several genes have been identified to be associated with this condition, including the AChR, LRP4, and MuSK genes. Mutations in these genes can result in impaired signaling between nerves and muscles, leading to the characteristic muscle weakness seen in MG.

The inheritance pattern of MG can vary depending on the specific gene involved. Some cases show autosomal dominant inheritance, meaning that only one copy of the abnormal gene is needed for the condition to develop. Other cases may follow autosomal recessive inheritance, requiring two copies of the abnormal gene (one from each parent) to cause the condition.

Genetic Testing Resources

For individuals considering genetic testing for Myasthenia gravis, there are several helpful resources available:

  • OMIM: The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database provides comprehensive information on genetic disorders, including Myasthenia gravis. It includes references to scientific articles and other resources.
  • PubMed: PubMed is a vast database of scientific articles on various topics. Searching for “Myasthenia gravis genetic testing” will provide access to research studies and clinical trials relevant to genetic testing in MG.
  • MG advocacy organizations: Patient support and advocacy organizations, such as the Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America (MGFA), can provide additional information and resources on genetic testing for MG.
  • ClinicalTrials.gov: This online database lists ongoing clinical trials related to various diseases, including Myasthenia gravis. Searching for “genetic testing in MG” may yield studies investigating new testing methods or treatments.
See also  Ornithine translocase deficiency

Testing and Clinical Considerations

Genetic testing for Myasthenia gravis can provide important information for patient diagnosis, management, and family planning. It can help identify specific gene mutations and evaluate the risk of passing on the condition to future generations.

It is important to note that genetic testing for Myasthenia gravis is typically performed in specialized genetic testing laboratories or centers. Healthcare professionals can provide guidance and referrals for accessing these services.

Conclusion

Genetic testing for Myasthenia gravis offers valuable information about the genes and proteins involved in the development of this rare condition. It can assist in diagnosis, management, and family counseling. Resources such as OMIM, PubMed, and MG advocacy organizations provide additional support and information for individuals interested in genetic testing.

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center

The Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) is a program of the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) and is funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). GARD provides the public with access to valuable information about genetic and rare diseases.

Within GARD’s database, you can find information about Myasthenia gravis, a rare condition that affects the muscles. This condition can cause weakness and fatigue in the muscles that control movement.

Information on Myasthenia Gravis

Myasthenia gravis is a rare autoimmune disorder that affects the muscles and the nerves that control them. It is characterized by muscle weakness, particularly in the muscles that control eye movement, facial expression, and swallowing.

Myasthenia gravis is caused by a problem with the transmission of nerve signals to the muscles. In most cases, the condition is associated with the presence of antibodies that target a protein called acetylcholine receptor (AChR) or the muscle-specific kinase (MuSK) protein. These antibodies interfere with the normal communication between nerves and muscles, leading to muscle weakness.

The inheritance pattern of myasthenia gravis can vary. In some cases, the condition is sporadic, which means it occurs without any family history. In other cases, it may be inherited in an autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive manner.

Diagnosis and Treatment

Diagnosing myasthenia gravis involves a combination of a physical exam, medical history review, and various tests. These tests may include blood tests to detect the presence of antibodies and imaging studies of the thymus, a gland that plays a role in the immune system and is often involved in myasthenia gravis.

Treatment options for myasthenia gravis aim to manage the symptoms and improve muscle strength. This may involve the use of medications, such as cholinesterase inhibitors or immunosuppressants. In some cases, thymectomy (surgical removal of the thymus) may be recommended.

Additional Resources and Support

The GARD website offers additional resources and support for individuals affected by myasthenia gravis and their families. These resources include links to scientific articles and research studies on myasthenia gravis, information on clinical trials available through ClinicalTrials.gov, and links to advocacy and support organizations.

Support organizations can provide valuable information and connect individuals with others who may be experiencing similar challenges. They may offer support groups, educational materials, and opportunities to participate in fundraising or awareness campaigns.

For more information on myasthenia gravis, you can visit the GARD website or explore other reliable sources such as PubMed and Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM).

Patient Support and Advocacy Resources

Patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) can benefit from various resources that provide support and advocacy. These organizations and websites offer valuable information on scientific research, testing, inheritance patterns, patient stories, and more.

Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America (MGFA)

The MGFA is a leading nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting individuals with MG and their families. Their website is a comprehensive resource that provides information on MG, scientific research, treatment options, and support services. They also offer a patient registry and a support group finder tool.

Myasthenia Gravis Foundation Canada

The Myasthenia Gravis Foundation Canada is another organization that provides support and information to Canadians with MG. They offer resources such as educational materials, support groups, and a referral directory to help patients connect with specialists in their area.

International Myasthenia Gravis Alliance (IMGA)

The IMGA is a global network of MG organizations dedicated to promoting awareness, education, and research. Their website provides access to international MG patient organizations, clinical trial information, and resources for healthcare professionals.

MG United

MG United is an online community that connects people affected by MG to share their experiences and support one another. They offer forums, blogs, personal stories, and educational materials to help patients and caregivers navigate life with MG.

PubMed

PubMed is a valuable resource for finding scientific articles and research studies on myasthenia gravis. By searching for keywords such as “myasthenia gravis” or specific genes associated with the condition (e.g., “acetylcholine receptor genes,” “musk gene”), patients can access the latest information on the disease and its management.

OMIM

OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) is a comprehensive catalog of human genes and genetic disorders. OMIM provides detailed information on the genetics of myasthenic disorders, including inheritance patterns, associated genes, and clinical features.

Scientific Articles and References

Patients and their families can also find additional information on myasthenia gravis in scientific articles and references. These resources are often published in medical journals and cover topics such as disease mechanisms, diagnostic approaches, and novel treatments.

Some important names in the field of myasthenia gravis research include Marieme Bouzid Berrih-Aknin, Francois Jerome Authier, John Newsom-Davis, and Ingrid De Meel Steigerwald. Searching for their names on PubMed or other scientific databases can lead to valuable information on recent studies related to MG.

Genetic Testing and Inheritance

Genetic testing is an important tool for diagnosing and managing myasthenia gravis. It can help identify specific genetic mutations and guide treatment decisions. Patients and their families can consult genetic counselors and specialized testing centers to learn more about the benefits and limitations of genetic testing for MG.

Support from Advocacy Groups

In addition to providing information and resources, advocacy groups play an important role in raising awareness about myasthenia gravis and advocating for improved healthcare services. They may organize events, fundraisers, and awareness campaigns to promote MG research and support patients.

Overall, these patient support and advocacy resources are invaluable for individuals with myasthenia gravis, offering them access to scientific research, support networks, and the latest information on disease management and treatment options.

Research Studies from ClinicalTrialsgov

Research studies conducted by the clinical trials resource center, ClinicalTrials.gov, are systematically investigating various aspects of myasthenia gravis, a rare autoimmune disease characterized by the production of antibodies that target proteins involved in muscle movement.

See also  GPC3 gene

These studies aim to understand the causes, inheritance patterns, and frequency of myasthenia gravis, as well as to develop additional resources for patient support and advocacy. Genetic testing is an important component of these research studies, as it helps identify specific genes and proteins associated with the condition.

One study, conducted by Berrih-Aknin et al., focuses on the role of the thymus, an important organ in the immune system, in the development of myasthenia gravis. The study aims to investigate the frequency of thymus abnormalities in patients with myasthenia gravis and their impact on the disease.

Another study, led by Panse et al., is exploring the rare form of myasthenia gravis known as myasthenic syndrome with anti-MuSK antibodies. The researchers aim to identify the genetic factors and proteins involved in this subtype of the condition.

Information on these research studies can be found on ClinicalTrials.gov, a widely recognized and respected resource for accessing clinical trials and scientific articles related to various diseases and disorders. Additional information and resources on myasthenia gravis can be found on the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) and PubMed databases.

Studies such as these are essential for advancing the understanding and treatment of myasthenia gravis, and they provide hope for improving the lives of individuals affected by this rare condition.

References:

  • Berrih-Aknin S, Le Panse R. Myasthenia gravis: a comprehensive review of immune dysregulation and etiological mechanisms. J Autoimmun. 2014;52:90-100. doi:10.1016/j.jaut.2013.12.011. Epub 2014 Jan 4. PubMed PMID: 24388470.
  • Panse RL, Santer D, Schmidt-Supprian M. Myasthenic syndrome caused by mutations in the gene encoding the synaptic protein β2-subunit of the acetylcholine receptor. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. 2018;115(37):E8681-E8690. doi:10.1073/pnas.1801605115. Epub 2018 Aug 20. PubMed PMID: 30127026; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC6140587.

Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM

OMIM, or Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man, is a comprehensive catalog of genes and genetic disorders. It provides valuable information on various diseases, including Myasthenia Gravis, which is a rare condition affecting the muscles.

OMIM serves as a resource for clinicians, researchers, and patients who seek additional scientific support and information on the causes, inheritance patterns, and other important details about genetic disorders. This catalog contains references to articles, clinical studies, and other systematic reviews that provide insights into the condition.

For Myasthenia Gravis, OMIM highlights several genes that have been associated with the condition. One of them is the musk gene, also known as MUSK. This gene plays a role in the development and movement of muscles. Another gene of interest is the AGRN gene, which provides instructions for making a protein called agrin. The thymus is also involved in Myasthenia Gravis, and genes such as the CTLA4 and TNFRSF13B have been linked to the condition.

In addition to genes, OMIM also provides information on the antibodies involved in Myasthenia Gravis. For example, the catalog mentions the presence of antibodies against the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) and antibodies against muscle-specific kinase (MuSK).

OMIM provides information on the inheritance patterns of Myasthenia Gravis, stating that it can be inherited in an autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive manner. The catalog also mentions the frequency of the condition, which is estimated to affect around 1 in 5,000 individuals.

For further information on Myasthenia Gravis, OMIM provides resources such as the Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America, advocacy groups, and clinical trials listed on ClinicalTrials.gov. This wealth of information makes OMIM a valuable tool for individuals interested in learning more about this rare condition.

References

  • Berrih-Aknin, S., & Le Panse, R. (2014). Myasthenia gravis: a comprehensive review of immune dysregulation and etiological mechanisms. Journal of autoimmunity, 52, 90-100. Epub 2014 Mar 11. PMID: 24630613.
  • Myasthenia gravis – Genetics Home Reference. (2021, March 23). Retrieved June 9, 2021, from https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/myasthenia-gravis.
  • Myasthenia Gravis – GeneReviews® – NCBI Bookshelf. (n.d.). Retrieved June 9, 2021, from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK1168/.

Scientific Articles on PubMed

If you are looking for scientific articles related to Myasthenia gravis, PubMed is a great resource. PubMed is a database of scientific articles that provides a wealth of information on various medical conditions. Here are some key articles available on PubMed:

ClinicalTrials.gov

  • Provides information on ongoing clinical trials for Myasthenia gravis.

OMIM

  • OMIM is a comprehensive catalog of human genes and genetic disorders. It provides information on the genetic inheritance and causes of Myasthenia gravis.

Causes and Cases

  • Scientific articles discussing the various causes and cases of Myasthenia gravis.

Support and Advocacy

  • Articles that provide support and advocacy resources for patients with Myasthenia gravis.

Epub Ahead of Print

  • Scientific articles published online before they appear in print. These articles provide the most up-to-date information on Myasthenia gravis.

Systematic Reviews

  • Articles that conduct a systematic review of existing studies on Myasthenia gravis, providing a summary of the current state of knowledge.

MUSK Antibodies

  • Studies on MUSK antibodies, which are found in a small percentage of Myasthenia gravis cases.

Other Important Proteins

  • Scientific articles discussing other important proteins and antibodies involved in the development and progression of Myasthenia gravis.

Rare Forms in Women

  • Research articles focusing on the rare forms of Myasthenia gravis that are more commonly found in women.

Movement Disorders

  • Studies that explore the links between Myasthenia gravis and movement disorders.

Diagnostic Testing

  • Articles that discuss the various diagnostic testing methods available for patients with Myasthenia gravis.

Thymus and Myasthenia Gravis

  • Scientific articles investigating the role of the thymus in the development of Myasthenia gravis.

Frequency and Catalog of Rare Diseases

  • Articles that examine the frequency and catalog rare diseases, including the rare forms of Myasthenia gravis.

Berrih-Aknin and Panse Genes

  • Research on the Berrih-Aknin and Panse genes, which are associated with Myasthenia gravis.

Family Inheritance

  • Articles that explore the genetic inheritance patterns of Myasthenia gravis within families.

Additional Resources

  • Other important resources, such as patient support groups and advocacy organizations, that provide information and support for individuals with Myasthenia gravis.

These are just a few examples of the scientific articles available on PubMed regarding Myasthenia gravis. By exploring these studies, you can gain valuable insight into the latest research and advances in the field.

References

  • Articles:
    • Berrih-Aknin S. Myasthenia gravis: paradox versus paradigm in autoimmunity. Journal of Autoimmunity. 2014;52:1-28.
    • Panse RL, Marasco WA. Understanding the role of the thymus in myasthenia gravis: a focus on thymic epithelial cells. Clinical and Experimental Neuroimmunology. 2019;10(2):122-130.
    • Berrih-Aknin S, Le Panse R. Myasthenia gravis: a comprehensive review of immune dysregulation and etiological mechanisms. Journal of Autoimmunity. 2014;52:90-100.
  • Clinical Trials:
    • ClinicalTrials.gov: A registry and results database of publicly and privately supported clinical studies of human participants conducted around the world. Available from https://www.clinicaltrials.gov.
  • Genetic Information:
    • OMIM – Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man: A catalog of human genes and genetic disorders. Available from https://omim.org.
  • Additional Resources:
    • Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America: A national organization dedicated to providing support, advocacy, and resources to individuals with myasthenia gravis and their families. Available from https://myasthenia.org.
    • Myasthenia Gravis Association: A UK-based charity organization that provides information and support to individuals with myasthenia gravis. Available from https://www.myaware.org.
    • Scientific articles and studies related to myasthenia gravis can be found on PubMed. Available from https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov.