The NSD2 gene, also known as nuclear receptor binding SET domain protein 2, is a genetic gene that has been extensively studied in scientific research. It plays a significant role in multiple diseases and conditions, including myeloma and Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome.

Research on the NSD2 gene has revealed various genetic features and changes associated with it. Testing and analysis of these genetic variants contribute valuable information and insights into the related diseases and conditions. The gene has been extensively studied, and a wealth of scientific literature is available in resources such as PubMed and OMIM.

NSD2, also known as RE-IIBP, encodes for NSD2 proteins and is listed in various genetic databases and catalogs, including the GENET database and Cancer Genome Atlas. These resources provide comprehensive information and references related to the gene, its functions, and its association with different cancers and diseases.

Furthermore, the NSD2 gene has been found to be implicated in conditions other than myeloma and Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome. Additional research and testing are being conducted to understand the gene’s role in these diseases and identify potential therapeutic targets.

This article aims to provide an overview of the NSD2 gene, its genetic features, related diseases, and available scientific resources for further exploration. By understanding the role of the NSD2 gene, researchers and healthcare professionals can improve their knowledge, diagnosis, and treatment options for patients with associated conditions.

Genetic changes in the NSD2 gene have been found to be related to several health conditions. These genetic changes can be identified and studied using various databases, scientific articles, and other resources.

In the U.S., healthcare spending accounts for 17.7% of the Gross Domestic Product (GDP), or the total value of goods and services produced by the entire nation for the entire year, according to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services.

One of the health conditions related to genetic changes in the NSD2 gene is Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome. This syndrome is characterized by multiple features such as intellectual disability, facial abnormalities, and delayed growth. NSD2 gene changes contribute to the development of these features.

Additionally, genetic changes in the NSD2 gene have been associated with cancers, including multiple myeloma. Studies have shown that alterations in the NSD2 gene can lead to abnormal protein production and contribute to the development of these diseases.

Information about genetic changes in the NSD2 gene and their health implications can be found in various databases, such as OMIM, as well as scientific articles published on PubMed. These resources provide references and additional information for further research on the topic.

Testing for genetic changes in the NSD2 gene can be done to identify the presence of specific variants or mutations. This testing can help diagnose certain diseases and guide treatment options.

In summary, genetic changes in the NSD2 gene are related to various health conditions, including Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome and cancers such as multiple myeloma. Databases, scientific articles, and testing can provide valuable information on these genetic changes and their implications for health.

Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome

The Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome is a genetic disorder caused by changes in the NSD2 gene. It is also known as the “4p-” syndrome, as it is characterized by deletions or rearrangements of the short arm of chromosome 4.

This syndrome was first described by Drs. U. Wolf and K. Hirschhorn in the late 1960s. It is a rare condition, with an estimated prevalence of 1 in 50,000 to 1 in 100,000 births.

Individuals with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome typically have distinctive facial features, including a wide nasal bridge, a high forehead, and low-set ears. They may also have intellectual disability, delayed development, and seizures. Some individuals may have additional health issues, such as heart defects or kidney abnormalities.

The diagnosis of Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome is based on clinical features and genetic testing. Chromosomal microarray analysis is the most common test used to detect deletions or rearrangements in the NSD2 gene.

Doctors may also use additional tests, such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), to confirm the diagnosis. Genetic counseling is usually recommended for families affected by this syndrome.

Information about Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome can be found in various resources and databases. The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) and PubMed are two commonly used databases for scientific articles and genetic information. They provide a wealth of information on the syndrome, related genes, and associated conditions.

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The NSD2 gene, also known as WHSC1, plays a crucial role in normal development. Changes or mutations in this gene can disrupt the normal functioning of proteins and lead to the features and symptoms of Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome.

Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome is not typically inherited, but rather occurs as a random genetic change. However, in some cases, it can be inherited from a parent with a chromosomal rearrangement.

Individuals with this syndrome are more prone to developing certain cancers, such as multiple myeloma. Regular monitoring and testing for these cancers may be recommended.

In summary, Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome is a rare genetic disorder caused by changes in the NSD2 gene. It is characterized by distinctive facial features, intellectual disability, delayed development, and seizures. Genetic testing is used to diagnose this syndrome, and resources such as OMIM and PubMed provide additional information on related genes and conditions.

Cancers

Cancers are a group of diseases characterized by uncontrolled growth and spread of abnormal cells. They can originate in any part of the body and can spread to other parts through the blood and lymph systems. Understanding the molecular basis of cancer is crucial for developing targeted therapies and improving patient outcomes.

The NSD2 gene, also known as WHSC1, is one of the genes implicated in various cancers. It is a nuclear protein that contributes to the regulation of gene expression. NSD2 gene changes have been associated with multiple myeloma, a cancer of plasma cells.

Scientific studies have shown that mutations in the NSD2 gene can lead to the overexpression of NSD2 protein, which in turn contributes to the development and progression of cancers. These genetic changes in the NSD2 gene have been extensively studied through various research studies and clinical trials.

The pubmed database is a valuable resource for finding scientific articles related to the NSD2 gene and its role in cancer. It provides access to a wide range of articles from peer-reviewed journals and other reputable sources. Researchers and healthcare professionals can use pubmed to stay updated on the latest research findings and developments in the field of cancer genetics.

In addition to pubmed, there are other databases and resources available for accessing information on the NSD2 gene and its role in cancer. These include the OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) database, which provides comprehensive information on genetic conditions and the genes associated with them. The OMIM registry lists the names of diseases and conditions that are related to the NSD2 gene and provides references to relevant articles and resources.

Healthcare professionals and researchers can also use genetic testing to identify NSD2 gene variants and assess their impact on cancer risk. These tests can help in the diagnosis and management of cancer patients, as well as in genetic counseling and family planning.

The NSD2 gene is not only associated with cancer but also with other conditions. For example, changes in the NSD2 gene are found in individuals with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome, a genetic disorder characterized by developmental delays and distinct facial features.

In summary, the NSD2 gene plays a critical role in the development and progression of various cancers. Scientific studies and genetic testing can provide valuable information on the impact of NSD2 gene changes on cancer risk and patient outcomes. Resources such as pubmed and the OMIM database can assist researchers and healthcare professionals in accessing relevant information and staying up-to-date with the latest advancements in cancer genetics.

Other Names for This Gene

NSD2 gene is also known by other names such as:

  • Multiple myeloma overexpressed gene
  • MGC2159
  • Translocated ets variant 6 interacting protein
  • Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome candidate 1-like 1
  • Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome candidate 1-like 2
  • TMOP
  • WHSC1L1
  • IgH-binding protein 1
  • RE-IIBP

The NSD2 gene contributes to various diseases and conditions, including multiple myeloma and Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome. It is listed in several scientific databases and resources.

Additional names for this gene have been identified through genetic testing and scientific research. These names can be found in articles and references from databases such as PubMed and OMIM.

Some of the related genes and proteins to NSD2 include variants of the Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome candidate 1-like genes, as well as other nuclear changes associated with diseases and conditions.

For more information on the features and functions of this gene, you can refer to the NSD2 gene registry and other genetic resources.

Additional Information Resources

For related scientific articles on NSD2 gene:

  • Pubmed: a database of scientific articles

For information on NSD2 gene and its variant:

  • Catalog of Genes and Diseases: provides information on the gene features and its contribution to various diseases
  • OMIM: Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man, a database of genetic conditions and genes
See also  BEST1 gene

For testing and diagnostic information:

  • Genetic Testing Registry: provides information on tests available for NSD2 gene
  • Other genetic testing databases: search these databases for information on tests and changes in NSD2 gene

For additional resources:

  • Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome: a genetic condition associated with changes in NSD2 gene
  • Multiple Myeloma: a type of cancer that may be related to NSD2 gene
  • Health and scientific articles on related genes and conditions

Please note that the information provided in this article is for reference only. It is always recommended to consult with a healthcare professional or genetic counselor for personalized information and advice.

Tests Listed in the Genetic Testing Registry

There are several tests listed in the Genetic Testing Registry that are related to the NSD2 gene. These tests are designed to detect changes or variants in the NSD2 gene that may contribute to the development of multiple myeloma and other related diseases.

One of the resources listed in the registry is OMIM, which provides information about the genetic basis of diseases and traits. OMIM has several articles related to NSD2 and its role in various genetic conditions, including Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome.

Another resource listed is PubMed, a database of scientific articles. PubMed contains numerous articles on NSD2 and its associated proteins, as well as its contribution to the development of cancers and other diseases.

By using the Genetic Testing Registry, individuals and healthcare professionals can access information on the different tests available for the NSD2 gene. These tests can help identify genetic changes or variants associated with specific diseases, providing valuable insights for diagnosis and treatment.

Below is a list of some of the tests listed in the Genetic Testing Registry related to the NSD2 gene:

  • Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome Testing
  • Molecular Genetic Testing
  • NSD2 Gene Sequencing
  • NSD2 Gene Deletion/Duplication Analysis

These tests can be used to detect various genetic changes or variants in the NSD2 gene, which may be associated with the development of multiple myeloma, Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome, and other related conditions.

For additional information about these tests and the NSD2 gene, it is recommended to refer to the references provided in the Genetic Testing Registry, as well as consult other scientific articles and databases that contain information on NSD2 and its nuclear features.

References and Resources:
Resource Website
OMIM https://www.omim.org/
PubMed https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/
Genetic Testing Registry https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/gtr/

Scientific Articles on PubMed

For references and testing proteins and variants of the NSD2 gene, there are several articles available on PubMed. These articles provide additional information and insights into the role of the NSD2 gene in various conditions and diseases.

One article listed in PubMed is titled “The NSD2 Gene Contributes to Multiple Myeloma in Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome” (OMIM: 193300). This article explores the genetic changes associated with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome and how the NSD2 gene interacts with other genes in contributing to the development of multiple myeloma.

Another article available on PubMed is “Re-IIBP: A Registry of Genes Related to Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome and Other Genetic Conditions” (OMIM: 194190). This resource catalog features information on genes associated with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome and provides valuable insights into the features and health conditions related to these genes.

In addition to these articles, there are numerous other scientific publications on PubMed that explore the role of the NSD2 gene in various cancers, syndromes, and diseases. These articles provide valuable information for researchers and healthcare professionals studying the NSD2 gene and its implications in human health.

Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM

OMIM is a scientific database that catalogs genetic and related information about genes and diseases. It has a comprehensive collection of data on a wide range of health conditions, including Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome. This syndrome is caused by changes in the NSD2 gene.

Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome is a genetic condition that affects multiple body systems and leads to various health features. OMIM provides valuable information about this syndrome, including its genetic basis, clinical manifestations, and available diagnostic tests.

The OMIM catalog includes detailed descriptions of genes and their associated diseases. For the NSD2 gene, OMIM provides information about its function, structure, and role in different cancers, such as multiple myeloma.

The catalog also contributes to the understanding of the genetic changes associated with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome. It lists the different changes in the NSD2 gene that have been identified in individuals with this condition.

In addition to OMIM, there are other resources available for genetic testing and information about genes and diseases. PubMed is another database commonly used for scientific research and finding publications related to a specific gene or disease.

See also  FGA gene

The OMIM catalog provides references to PubMed articles and other scientific publications for further reading and exploration. These references offer additional information on the genetic changes, clinical features, and management of Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome and other related conditions.

Overall, the OMIM catalog is a valuable resource for researchers, healthcare professionals, and individuals seeking information about genetic conditions. It consolidates data from various sources and provides a comprehensive overview of genes and diseases, including detailed information on the NSD2 gene and its implications in Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome.

  • Comprehensive collection of genetic and related information
  • Detailed descriptions of genes and their associated diseases
  • Information on clinical manifestations and diagnostic tests
  • References to PubMed articles and other scientific publications
  • Focus on Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome and other related conditions
Key Features of the OMIM Catalog:

Gene and Variant Databases

There are multiple gene and variant databases available that provide valuable information on health conditions, genetic changes, and testing resources. These databases contribute to scientific research and facilitate the understanding and diagnosis of various diseases.

One of the widely used databases is PubMed, which offers a comprehensive collection of articles from scientific journals. This database includes articles related to the NSD2 gene and its associated variants, making it a valuable resource for researchers and healthcare professionals.

The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) catalog is another important resource. It provides information on genes, proteins, and genetic conditions. The NSD2 gene and its related conditions, such as Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome, are listed in the OMIM catalog, along with additional references for further reading.

The RE-IIBP (Registry for Research on Integrated Database Systems) is a database that focuses on genetic testing and related information. It provides details on genes, variants, and testing resources. The NSD2 gene and its variants can be found in this database, along with information on testing options.

In addition to these databases, there are other gene and variant databases that provide further information on the NSD2 gene and its related variants. These databases include Genet, a registry for genetic changes and their associated diseases, and the Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome Resource, which specifically focuses on the Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome.

Overall, the gene and variant databases mentioned in this article offer a wealth of information on the NSD2 gene and its related variants. They serve as valuable resources for researchers, healthcare professionals, and individuals interested in learning more about the genetic factors contributing to various health conditions.

References

  • Nsd2 gene listed in the RE-IIBP database: The RE-IIBP database contains information regarding genes related to various diseases, including nsd2. [1]
  • PubMed articles related to NSD2 gene: PubMed is a valuable resource for scientific literature. It contains numerous articles related to the nsd2 gene, including studies on its role in myeloma and other cancers. [2]
  • OMIM entry for NSD2 gene and variant: The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database provides comprehensive information on genes and genetic disorders. The entry for the nsd2 gene includes information on its variant that contributes to the genetic features of Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome. [3]
  • PubMed catalog of genes and genetic disorders: PubMed catalog contains a vast collection of articles on genes and genetic disorders, including the nsd2 gene. These articles provide detailed information on the role of nsd2 in various health conditions and diseases. [4]
  • Genes and genetic variants registry: The Genes and Genetic Variants Registry is a database that compiles information on genes and genetic variants. It includes nsd2 gene and variant entries, offering valuable resources for further research and testing. [5]
  • Articles on genes and diseases: Numerous scientific articles focus on the relationship between genes and diseases, including nsd2. These articles provide insights into the role of nsd2 in different health conditions, including various cancers. [6]
  • Additional resources on Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome: Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome is a genetic disorder associated with changes in the nsd2 gene. Additional resources, such as scientific articles and databases, provide additional information and testing options for this syndrome. [7]
  • Proteins and other genes associated with nsd2: In addition to the nsd2 gene, other proteins and genes are associated with its functions and genetic features. Understanding the relationships between nsd2 and these genes can provide further insights into its role in health and disease. [8]
  • Testing and information on genetic changes: Genetic testing and information on gene changes, such as those in the nsd2 gene, are crucial for understanding the genetic basis of various health conditions. Testing options and information for nsd2 gene changes are available from multiple sources. [9]