The PARK7 gene, also known as DJ-1, is a genetic factor that has been of great interest in scientific studies related to Parkinson’s disease. PARK7 is one of the genes that has been extensively studied for its role in early-onset Parkinson’s disease. Mutations in this gene can lead to changes in the DJ-1 protein, which can cause damage to cells and contribute to the development of the disease.

Studies have shown that variations in the PARK7 gene can increase the risk of developing Parkinson’s disease. The PARK7 gene is responsible for producing the DJ-1 protein, which plays a crucial role in protecting cells from oxidative stress and free radicals. When the PARK7 gene is mutated, the DJ-1 protein may not function properly, leading to an increased risk of cell damage and the development of Parkinson’s disease.

Testing for variations in the PARK7 gene can be an important tool for identifying individuals at risk for Parkinson’s disease. Genetic testing can provide valuable information about an individual’s genetic makeup and help determine if they have any genetic variants associated with the disease. Testing for the PARK7 gene can be particularly useful for individuals with a family history of early-onset Parkinson’s disease or other related conditions.

There are several resources and databases available for obtaining information about the PARK7 gene. The National Center for Biotechnology Information’s PubMed and OMIM databases provide scientific articles, references, and additional information about the PARK7 gene. The Genetic Testing Registry and Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) catalogs also provide information about genetic testing options and other related resources.

In conclusion, the PARK7 gene, also known as DJ-1, is a genetic factor that has been extensively studied for its role in Parkinson’s disease. Mutations in this gene can lead to changes in the DJ-1 protein, causing cell damage and contributing to the development of the disease. Testing for variations in the PARK7 gene can be an essential tool for identifying individuals at risk for Parkinson’s disease and other related conditions. Various resources and databases provide access to scientific articles, references, and additional information about the PARK7 gene and genetic testing options.

Genetic changes in the PARK7 gene have been associated with several health conditions. These conditions are documented in various registries and databases such as OMIM, PubMed, and additional scientific studies. Particularly, the PARK7 gene variant, also known as DJ-1, has been linked to Parkinson’s disease.

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PubMed, a central catalog of scientific articles, lists a number of studies about the genetic changes in PARK7 and related genes. These changes can contribute to the early-onset of Parkinson’s disease and may also be associated with other diseases.

The PARK7 gene is just one of the many genes that have been identified in relation to Parkinson’s disease. Additional genes related to this disease can be found in scientific studies and databases. These studies provide valuable information about the role of genes in the development and progression of the disease.

Understanding the genetic changes in PARK7 and other related genes is important for the early detection and prevention of diseases. It can also help in the development of targeted therapies for individuals with these genetic changes.

Health conditions related to genetic changes in the PARK7 gene can have a significant impact on individuals. These conditions can result in damage to the central nervous system and the production of proteins that are important for normal bodily functions.

For more information on health conditions related to the PARK7 gene and genetic changes, references to articles and resources can be found in databases such as OMIM, PubMed, and scientific studies. It is also possible to undergo free genetic testing to determine if an individual carries these genetic changes.

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In conclusion, the genetic changes in the PARK7 gene and related genes have been linked to various health conditions, particularly Parkinson’s disease. The information available from scientific studies and databases such as OMIM and PubMed provide valuable insights into these genetic changes and their impact on health.

Parkinson’s disease

Parkinson’s disease is a neurodegenerative disorder that primarily affects the movement of individuals. It is a chronic and progressive disorder that usually starts with mild symptoms such as tremors, stiffness, and difficulty in walking, and eventually leads to severe motor complications.

The PARK7 gene, also known as DJ-1, is one of the genes associated with Parkinson’s disease. Mutations or changes in this gene are linked to the early-onset form of the disease. PARK7 encodes a protein involved in the protection of cells against oxidative damage caused by free radicals.

Scientific studies have identified other genes that are related to the development of Parkinson’s disease. These genes include SNCA, LRRK2, and PINK1, among others. The variants in these genes have been found to contribute to the risk of developing Parkinson’s disease.

Information about the PARK7 gene and other related genes can be found in databases such as OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) and the Parkinson’s Disease Mutation Database. These resources provide details on the genetic changes associated with the disease and additional information on the genes involved.

In addition to genetic testing, there are other diagnostic tests available for Parkinson’s disease. These include brain imaging tests, such as MRI and PET scans, and clinical assessments by healthcare professionals. The diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease is primarily based on the presence of specific motor symptoms.

Further research and studies are continuously being conducted to better understand the underlying mechanisms and causes of Parkinson’s disease. PubMed and PubMed Central are valuable resources for accessing scientific articles and publications related to Parkinson’s disease.

The Parkinson’s Disease Registry is a free online platform that collects comprehensive information on individuals with Parkinson’s disease. It aims to facilitate research, improve healthcare outcomes, and promote collaborations in the field. The registry allows individuals to contribute their data and participate in clinical trials, providing valuable insights into the disease.

Overall, understanding the genetic and molecular basis of Parkinson’s disease is crucial for advancing research and developing targeted therapies for this debilitating condition.

Other Names for This Gene

The PARK7 gene, also known by other names, plays a significant role in Parkinson’s disease, particularly in its early-onset variant. Some additional names for this gene include:

  • DJ-1 gene
  • PARK7 oncogene
  • PARK7 protein
  • Parkinson’s disease protein 7
  • Protein deglycase DJ-1

These names are used in scientific literature and databases such as OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man), PubMed (a database of scientific articles), and the GeneTests Genetic Testing Registry. The PARK7 gene is listed as a central gene associated with Parkinson’s disease and is found to be involved in the damage and changes to proteins caused by radicals.

References and studies have shown that variants of the PARK7 gene are linked to Parkinson’s disease, and testing this gene can provide useful information for diagnosing and understanding the disease. Additionally, the PARK7 gene has been found to be associated with other health conditions and diseases.

Additional Information Resources

If you want to learn more about the PARK7 gene and its related conditions, you can find a wealth of information and resources. Below are some particularly useful databases, articles, and studies that you can explore:

  • OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) – This database provides comprehensive information on genetic disorders, including early-onset Parkinson’s disease and other conditions related to the PARK7 gene. You can search for specific variant names, genes, or diseases.

  • PubMed – A scientific database that contains a vast collection of articles related to genetics, parkinson’s disease, and the PARK7 gene. You can search for specific keywords to find relevant studies and research papers.

  • Genes & Disease – A free online book that provides an in-depth understanding of various diseases and the genes associated with them. The book covers different aspects of parkinson’s disease and the role of the PARK7 gene in its development.

  • Parkinson’s Disease Gene Database (PDGene) – A comprehensive registry of genes related to Parkinson’s disease. You can find information on the PARK7 gene, its variants, and their associations with the disease.

  • Wood DJ-1 Database – This database focuses specifically on the PARK7 gene and its encoded protein, DJ-1. It provides detailed information on the gene’s structure, function, and potential role in Parkinson’s disease.

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These resources will help you explore the latest scientific research, genetic changes, and testing options related to the PARK7 gene and its association with Parkinson’s disease and other related conditions. Make sure to consult reliable sources and scientific articles for accurate and up-to-date information.

Tests Listed in the Genetic Testing Registry

Genetic testing is an important tool for assessing the risk of developing various health conditions. One area of focus is early-onset diseases caused by changes in specific genes. The Genetic Testing Registry (GTR) provides information on tests that can identify these genes and their associated diseases.

One such gene is PARK7, also known as DJ-1. Variants in this gene have been linked to Parkinson’s disease, a progressive neurological disorder. The GTR lists several tests related to PARK7, including:

  • PARK7 Gene Sequencing
  • PARK7 Gene Deletion/Duplication Analysis

These tests can identify changes in the PARK7 gene that may be associated with Parkinson’s disease. By analyzing the DNA sequence or looking for deletions or duplications in the gene, healthcare professionals can assess the risk of developing the disease.

In addition to PARK7, there are many other genes listed in the GTR that are particularly relevant to early-onset diseases. The database provides the names of these genes and links to additional information, such as scientific studies and references in PubMed.

For example, the GTR lists genes related to diseases caused by changes in proteins involved in DNA damage repair, central nervous system development, and free radicals. Some of these genes include:

  • BRCA1
  • BRCA2
  • SMN1

These genes are associated with conditions such as breast and ovarian cancer (BRCA1 and BRCA2), spinal muscular atrophy (SMN1), and neurodegenerative diseases (PARK7).

By providing free access to this information, the GTR allows healthcare professionals and researchers to stay up-to-date on the latest genetic testing resources for early-onset diseases. It serves as a valuable tool for understanding the genetic basis of various health conditions and improving patient care.

For more information on specific tests and genes listed in the GTR, healthcare professionals and researchers can refer to the GTR website, PubMed, and other scientific databases.

Scientific Articles on PubMed

Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the damage and loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra of the brain. It is believed to be caused by a combination of both genetic and environmental factors.

One early-onset form of PD is caused by mutations in the PARK7 gene, also known as the DJ-1 gene. Mutations in this gene have been found to disrupt the normal function of the DJ-1 protein, leading to mitochondrial dysfunction and the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which can cause cellular damage.

PubMed is a central repository for scientific articles and provides a wealth of information on the PARK7 gene and its related proteins, including DJ-1. Researchers can access a wide range of studies, including those investigating the role of PARK7 in PD and other diseases.

In addition to scientific articles, PubMed also provides resources for genetic testing, such as the OMIM database, which lists genes associated with various conditions. This database can be particularly useful for researchers studying the genetic changes associated with PD and other neurodegenerative diseases.

References to scientific articles on PubMed can be used to gather information for additional studies. By exploring the catalog of articles related to PARK7 and other genes associated with PD, researchers can gain a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the disease.

Furthermore, PubMed provides access to free articles, which eliminates barriers to accessing scientific information. This allows researchers from around the world to stay updated on the latest developments in the field of PD research.

In conclusion, PubMed is a valuable resource for researchers studying the PARK7 gene and its relation to Parkinson’s disease. The database provides access to a vast collection of scientific articles, genetic resources, and other relevant information necessary for further studies in this field.

Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM

OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) is a database that provides comprehensive information about genes and genetic conditions. It is a valuable resource for researchers and healthcare professionals who need to access genetic information related to various diseases.

OMIM contains a catalog of genes and diseases, which includes the PARK7 gene. The PARK7 gene, also known as DJ-1, is listed in OMIM as a gene associated with Parkinson’s disease.

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Parkinson’s disease is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the loss of dopamine-producing brain cells. The PARK7 gene has been identified as one of the genetic factors contributing to the development of Parkinson’s disease. Variants in this gene can increase the risk of developing the disease.

OMIM provides detailed information about the PARK7 gene, including its function, associated diseases, and genetic changes. It also references scientific articles from PubMed, a central database of biomedical literature, for further reading and research.

In addition to the PARK7 gene, OMIM contains information about other genes and genetic conditions related to Parkinson’s disease and various other diseases. This catalog of genes and diseases is a valuable resource for scientists, healthcare professionals, and individuals interested in genetic testing and understanding the genetic basis of diseases.

OMIM is freely accessible and provides a wealth of information on genes, genetic conditions, and associated diseases. It serves as a central registry for genetic information and resources, allowing researchers and healthcare professionals to stay updated on the latest scientific findings and discoveries.

Understanding the genetic basis of diseases is crucial for the development of targeted treatments and interventions. OMIM provides a valuable platform for researchers to explore the genetic factors contributing to various diseases, including Parkinson’s disease.

In summary, OMIM’s catalog of genes and diseases includes the PARK7 gene, also known as DJ-1, which is associated with Parkinson’s disease. This database provides free access to comprehensive genetic information, references to scientific articles, and resources for studying various genetic conditions.

Gene and Variant Databases

For researchers studying the PARK7 gene and its variants, there are several genetic and variant databases available. These databases provide valuable information on the genetic changes and variations in the PARK7 gene, as well as their associations with various diseases and conditions.

One of the central databases for genetic information is the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database. This database provides comprehensive information on genes, genetic variants, and the diseases associated with them. It also includes references to scientific articles, which can be accessed through PubMed.

In addition to the OMIM database, there are several other databases that specifically focus on genetic variants. The dbSNP database, maintained by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), catalogues single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and other genetic variations. The Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC) database provides information on genetic variants from exome sequencing studies in various populations.

For researchers interested in the specific variants of the PARK7 gene, the PARK7-specific variant databases can be useful. The PARK7 Gene Variant Database provides a comprehensive catalog of PARK7 gene variants from scientific studies. It includes information on the variant names, their associations with diseases, and the references to the scientific articles supporting these associations. The DJ-1 Registry is another resource that collects information on PARK7 gene variants and their associations with Parkinson’s disease.

In addition to these variant-specific databases, there are also general gene databases that contain information on the PARK7 gene. The GeneCards database provides comprehensive information on genes, including their functions, protein products, and associated diseases. The Universal Protein Resource (UniProt) database provides detailed information on the protein products of genes, including their structures, functions, and interactions.

Overall, the availability of these gene and variant databases provides valuable resources for researchers studying the PARK7 gene and its variants. They offer a wealth of genetic information, variant testing resources, and references to scientific articles, enabling further studies on the role of the PARK7 gene in health and disease.

References