Prothrombin thrombophilia, also called prothrombin gene mutation, is a rare genetic condition that affects the clotting factors in the blood. It is associated with an increased risk of developing blood clots, particularly in the veins. This condition is caused by a mutation in the prothrombin gene, which is responsible for producing a protein called prothrombin, essential for normal blood clotting.

If you are looking for more information about prothrombin thrombophilia, there are several resources available. The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) catalog offers a comprehensive overview of genetic diseases, including prothrombin thrombophilia. PubMed, a database of scientific articles, provides additional articles and research studies on this condition.

The American Thrombosis and Hemostasis Network (ATHN) is a patient-centered advocacy group that provides support and resources for individuals with thrombophilia and other clotting disorders. The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) also offers resources and educational materials on prothrombin thrombophilia and other genetic factors associated with blood clots.

If you are interested in testing for prothrombin thrombophilia or other genetic factors associated with blood clots, talk to your healthcare provider. They can provide more information about the testing process and help determine if testing is necessary for you. Inheritance of prothrombin thrombophilia is somewhat complex, and genetic counseling may be beneficial to understand the potential risks and factors for you and your family.

Overall, prothrombin thrombophilia is a rare condition that can cause an increased risk of developing blood clots. Learning more about the causes and frequency of this condition can help individuals and healthcare providers better understand and support patients with prothrombin thrombophilia.

References:

– OMIM Catalog: Prothrombin Thrombophilia

Even with health insurance, patients in the U. S. have a hard time affording their medical care. About one in five working-age Americans with health insurance, and more than half of those without health insurance, reported having trouble paying their medical bills in the last year, according to S. News & World Report.

– PubMed: Prothrombin Thrombophilia

– American Thrombosis and Hemostasis Network (ATHN)

– National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI)

Frequency

The frequency of Prothrombin thrombophilia varies depending on the population. In the general population, this condition is relatively rare and is estimated to affect about 1 in 200 to 1 in 500 individuals.

However, the frequency of Prothrombin thrombophilia can be higher in certain populations or ethnic groups. For example, the condition is more common in people of European descent, with a frequency of about 2 to 4 percent in this population.

Prothrombin thrombophilia is also associated with an increased risk of developing venous clots, also known as deep vein thrombosis (DVT) or pulmonary embolism (PE). These blood clots can be severe and potentially life-threatening.

To learn more about the frequency of Prothrombin thrombophilia, you can refer to scientific articles and resources available from organizations such as the American Thrombosis and Hemostasis Network (ATHN) or the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) through their PubMed database.

Additional information on the frequency of Prothrombin thrombophilia can be found in the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) catalog, which provides comprehensive information on genetic diseases, including inheritance patterns and associated genes.

Testing for Prothrombin thrombophilia can be done to confirm the diagnosis in individuals suspected of having this condition. This testing typically involves analyzing certain genes involved in blood clotting, including the Prothrombin gene.

It is important to note that Prothrombin thrombophilia is just one of many genetic factors that can contribute to the risk of developing blood clots. Other rare genetic causes of thrombophilia, such as mutations in other genes, can also increase the risk. Therefore, it is important to consult with a healthcare professional for a comprehensive evaluation if there is a concern for thrombophilia.

Patient advocacy and support resources are available for individuals and families affected by Prothrombin thrombophilia. Organizations such as the National Blood Clot Alliance (NBCA) provide information, support groups, and educational materials to help those living with this condition.

Causes

Prothrombin thrombophilia is a genetic condition that increases the risk of developing blood clots, particularly in the veins. It is caused by mutations in the genes responsible for controlling the clotting factors in the blood.

One of the main causes of prothrombin thrombophilia is a mutation in the prothrombin gene, also known as factor II. This gene provides instructions for making a protein called prothrombin, which is involved in the clotting process. When this gene is mutated, it can lead to elevated levels of prothrombin in the blood, increasing the risk of clot formation.

Another genetic cause of prothrombin thrombophilia is mutations in other clotting factors, such as factor V Leiden. These mutations can also increase the risk of clotting.

Inheritance of prothrombin thrombophilia is considered to be autosomal dominant, which means that a person only needs to inherit one copy of the mutated gene to develop the condition. However, the severity and symptoms of the condition can vary somewhat, and not all individuals with the mutation will develop blood clots.

It is important to note that prothrombin thrombophilia is a rare condition, and most people with the mutation will never develop a blood clot. However, the presence of the mutation does increase the risk.

For more information about the genetic causes of prothrombin thrombophilia, you may refer to scientific articles and resources such as OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) and PubMed. These resources provide additional references and information about the genes and factors associated with this condition.

In particular, the American Thrombosis and Hemostasis Network (ATHN) is a center that provides resources and support for patients and advocacy for rare clotting disorders, including prothrombin thrombophilia. They have a comprehensive online catalog of genetic information and resources that can be helpful for learning more about this condition.

See also  RBPJ gene

Learn more about the gene associated with Prothrombin thrombophilia

Prothrombin thrombophilia is a genetic disorder that increases the risk of developing abnormal blood clots, also known as venous thromboembolism. One of the genes associated with this condition is called the prothrombin gene.

The prothrombin gene, also known as coagulation factor II gene, is responsible for producing a protein called prothrombin. Prothrombin plays a crucial role in the blood clotting process. Mutations in the prothrombin gene can lead to an overproduction of prothrombin, increasing the risk of blood clot formation.

This gene is also known by various other names, such as F2, THPH1, and RPRGL2. It is located on chromosome 11. Mutations in this gene can cause different diseases, including Prothrombin thrombophilia. In particular, a mutation known as the prothrombin G20210A mutation is associated with an increased risk of venous thromboembolism.

Testing for prothrombin gene mutations can be done to determine if an individual has an increased risk of developing Prothrombin thrombophilia. This is particularly important for individuals with a personal or family history of blood clots or other clotting disorders.

There are other genetic factors and environmental causes that can contribute to the development of Prothrombin thrombophilia. It is important to understand that the presence of the prothrombin gene mutation alone does not guarantee the development of the condition. The interaction of multiple factors, both genetic and environmental, is thought to play a role.

Learning more about the prothrombin gene and its role in Prothrombin thrombophilia can be valuable for healthcare professionals, patients, and their families. Additional information on this gene and its association with Prothrombin thrombophilia can be found in scientific articles, resources from genetic research centers, and genetic disorder advocacy organizations.

References:

These resources provide additional information on Prothrombin thrombophilia, its genetic inheritance patterns, testing methods, and other related factors.

It is important to note that Prothrombin thrombophilia is a rare condition, and the frequency of the prothrombin gene mutation varies among different populations. Therefore, genetic testing and diagnosis should be done in consultation with healthcare professionals experienced in the field of thrombophilia and genetic disorders.

Inheritance

Prothrombin thrombophilia is a genetic condition that affects the blood’s ability to clot properly. It is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, meaning that a mutation in one copy of the prothrombin gene (also called factor II) is sufficient to cause the condition. This means that individuals who inherit a mutated gene from one parent have a 50% chance of developing prothrombin thrombophilia.

In the general population, the frequency of the prothrombin gene mutation is relatively low, estimated to be around 1-2%. However, in certain populations, such as people of European descent, the frequency can be higher. The gene mutation is associated with an increased risk of developing blood clots, particularly in veins (venous thromboembolism), but it is important to note that not everyone with the gene mutation will develop blood clots.

There are additional factors that can influence the risk of developing blood clots in individuals with prothrombin thrombophilia. These factors include other genetic variations, medical conditions, lifestyle factors, and environmental factors. This means that not everyone with a prothrombin gene mutation will develop blood clots, and individuals without the gene mutation can still develop blood clots.

If you or someone in your family has been diagnosed with prothrombin thrombophilia, it is important to seek medical advice and genetic counseling. Genetic testing can confirm the presence of the gene mutation and help determine the risk of developing blood clots. It is also important to learn about other rare diseases and conditions associated with prothrombin thrombophilia in order to better understand the condition and its implications.

For more information about prothrombin thrombophilia, genetic testing, and resources for patients and advocacy support, you can visit the websites of the American Thrombosis and Hemostasis Network (ATHN), the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database. These resources provide comprehensive information, articles, and references on the topic.

  • American Thrombosis and Hemostasis Network (ATHN): www.athn.org
  • National Institutes of Health (NIH): www.nih.gov
  • Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database: www.omim.org

In conclusion, prothrombin thrombophilia is an inherited condition caused by a mutation in the prothrombin gene. However, the presence of the gene mutation does not guarantee the development of blood clots, as other factors can influence the risk. Genetic testing and consultation with healthcare professionals can provide more information and support for individuals with prothrombin thrombophilia.

Other Names for This Condition

Prothrombin thrombophilia, also known as factor II thrombophilia or factor II mutation, is a genetic condition that increases the risk of blood clots. It is called Prothrombin thrombophilia because it is caused by a mutation in the prothrombin gene, also known as the factor II gene.

Some other names for this condition include:

  • Factor II mutation
  • Factor II thrombophilia
  • Prothrombin G20210A mutation
  • Prothrombin gene mutation

The scientific name for this condition is “Prothrombin thrombophilia”, but it is often referred to by these other names in medical literature and resources.

The Prothrombin thrombophilia condition is relatively rare in the general population. According to the information from OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man), the frequency of this mutation is somewhat higher in certain population groups, such as individuals of European ancestry.

If you want to learn more about Prothrombin thrombophilia, you can find additional articles and scientific references on the PubMed database. The PubMed database is a comprehensive resource for scientific articles and research on various diseases and conditions. You can also find more information and resources on Prothrombin thrombophilia through advocacy and support center websites, such as the American Thrombosis and Hemostasis Network.

Genetic testing can help determine if a patient has Prothrombin thrombophilia. Testing for this condition may be recommended for individuals with a personal or family history of blood clots or clotting disorders. If you suspect you may have Prothrombin thrombophilia, it is important to consult with a healthcare professional who can provide guidance and recommendations on testing and management.

See also  GPHN gene

In summary, Prothrombin thrombophilia, also called factor II thrombophilia or factor II mutation, is a rare genetic condition associated with an increased risk of blood clots. It is caused by a mutation in the prothrombin gene. Additional names for this condition include factor II mutation, factor II thrombophilia, and Prothrombin G20210A mutation. If you are interested in learning more about this condition, you can find more information and scientific articles on PubMed and through advocacy and support center websites.

Additional Information Resources

  • NIH Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center: This website provides information about the inheritance, frequency, and genetic causes of prothrombin thrombophilia. It also offers links to resources for patient support and advocacy groups.
  • OMIM: The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) catalog provides scientific information about various genetic conditions, including prothrombin thrombophilia. It includes details about the associated genes and their names, as well as references to additional articles and research.
  • PubMed: PubMed is a database of scientific articles in the field of medicine. It contains a wealth of information on prothrombin thrombophilia, including studies on clotting factors and other genetic risk factors. A search on PubMed can provide more in-depth information on specific aspects of the condition.
  • American Heart Association: The American Heart Association offers resources and information on various cardiovascular diseases, including venous thrombosis and clotting disorders. Their website provides educational materials and support for patients and their families.
  • More about Prothrombin Thrombophilia: This section provides additional information on prothrombin thrombophilia, including its symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment options. It also highlights the importance of genetic testing and counselling for patients with this condition.

These resources can help individuals learn more about prothrombin thrombophilia and its association with venous clots. It is important for patients and healthcare providers to stay informed about the latest research and advancements in the field.

Genetic Testing Information

Genetic testing for prothrombin thrombophilia can provide valuable information about the genetic factors that may contribute to this condition. It can help to identify specific gene mutations that are associated with an increased risk of blood clotting.

There are several genes that have been identified as being associated with prothrombin thrombophilia. The most well-known gene is the prothrombin gene, which is also sometimes called factor II. Mutations in this gene can lead to an increased risk of blood clots.

Genetic testing for prothrombin thrombophilia can be done through various methods. One common method is to use a blood sample from the patient to analyze their DNA for specific gene mutations. The results of the genetic testing can provide important information about the patient’s risk for developing blood clots.

There are additional resources available to learn more about genetic testing for prothrombin thrombophilia. These resources include scientific articles, genetic testing centers, and patient advocacy groups. The American Thrombosis and Hemostasis Network (ATHN) provides a catalog of genetic testing centers that offer testing for this condition.

It is important to note that prothrombin thrombophilia is a rare condition, and genetic testing is not necessary for all patients. The frequency of specific gene mutations can vary among different populations. Therefore, genetic testing may be more appropriate for patients with a family history of blood clots or other rare causes of thrombophilia.

Genetic testing for prothrombin thrombophilia can provide valuable information about the inheritance and genetic factors associated with this condition. It can help patients and their healthcare providers make more informed decisions about their treatment and preventive measures. Genetic testing results can also provide support and guidance for patients and their families.

References:

  1. Names and OMIM numbers of genes associated with prothrombin thrombophilia: Prothrombin gene (OMIM: 176930)
  2. Articles about prothrombin thrombophilia on PubMed: Prothrombin Thrombophilia
  3. American Thrombosis and Hemostasis Network catalog of genetic testing centers: Genetic Testing Centers

These resources can provide more information about genetic testing for prothrombin thrombophilia and support for individuals and families affected by this condition.

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center

Prothrombin thrombophilia, also known as factor II mutation, is a genetic condition that affects blood clotting. It is caused by a mutation in the prothrombin gene.

The Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) provides information about this condition, including its frequency in the population. According to GARD, prothrombin thrombophilia is a relatively rare condition, but its exact frequency is somewhat unknown.

Prothrombin thrombophilia is associated with an increased risk of developing blood clots, particularly in the veins. GARD states that this condition may also be associated with other genes or factors, which can further increase the risk of clotting.

GARD offers additional resources for patients and their families who want to learn more about prothrombin thrombophilia. This includes links to articles from scientific journals and other references, such as PubMed and OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man).

Furthermore, GARD provides information on genetic testing, advocacy groups, and support organizations that specialize in rare genetic diseases like prothrombin thrombophilia.

It is important to note that prothrombin thrombophilia is just one of the many causes of thrombophilia. GARD recommends consulting with a healthcare professional for a comprehensive evaluation and diagnosis.

Summary of key points:

  • Prothrombin thrombophilia, also known as factor II mutation, is a genetic condition.
  • It affects blood clotting and is caused by a mutation in the prothrombin gene.
  • The frequency of prothrombin thrombophilia in the population is somewhat unknown.
  • Prothrombin thrombophilia is associated with an increased risk of venous blood clots.
  • Other genes and factors may further increase the risk of clotting in individuals with this condition.
  • GARD provides resources for patients and families, including articles from scientific journals and other references.
  • Genetic testing and support organizations are available for individuals with prothrombin thrombophilia.
  • Consulting with a healthcare professional is recommended for a comprehensive evaluation and diagnosis.
See also  POMT1 gene

Patient Support and Advocacy Resources

Patients and their families seeking information on prothrombin thrombophilia can find valuable resources to learn more about this condition, its causes, and associated genes. The following patient support and advocacy resources provide information, support, and advocacy for those affected by prothrombin thrombophilia:

  • American Thrombosis and Hemostasis Network (ATHN): The ATHN is a national nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the lives of individuals with bleeding and clotting disorders. Their website provides information on prothrombin thrombophilia, including the frequency of this condition in the population and the genetic factors associated with it.
  • Genetic Testing Registry (GTR): The GTR is a catalog of genetic tests and their associated genes. It provides information on the testing options available for prothrombin thrombophilia and other clotting disorders.
  • OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man): OMIM is a comprehensive database that provides information on genes and genetic diseases. Its entry on prothrombin thrombophilia includes references to scientific articles and other resources for further reading.
  • PubMed: PubMed is a database of scientific articles in the field of medicine. It contains a wealth of information on prothrombin thrombophilia and its association with other rare clotting disorders. Patients and their families can search for articles on specific topics or genes of interest.

In addition to these resources, patients with prothrombin thrombophilia may find support from patient advocacy organizations focused on clotting disorders or genetic conditions in general. These organizations often provide support groups, educational materials, and resources for managing the condition.

By accessing these patient support and advocacy resources, individuals affected by prothrombin thrombophilia can gain a better understanding of their condition and find support from others facing similar challenges.

Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM

The Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM is a valuable resource for understanding the genetic causes of various diseases, including thrombophilia. Thrombophilia is a condition characterized by an increased tendency to form blood clots, particularly in the veins.

OMIM provides a comprehensive list of genes associated with thrombophilia, along with references to scientific articles and other resources for further reading. One of the genes that is somewhat more common in certain populations is the prothrombin gene.

The prothrombin gene is associated with an increased risk of thrombophilia, and specific mutations in this gene can cause the condition. The frequency of these mutations varies among different populations.

OMIM is an excellent tool for patients, healthcare providers, and advocacy groups to learn more about the genetic factors underlying thrombophilia and other inherited diseases. There are many other genes and genetic factors that can contribute to this condition, and OMIM provides a comprehensive catalog of these genes.

OMIM also offers information about the inheritance patterns of thrombophilia and other diseases, as well as links to patient support groups and advocacy organizations for those affected by these conditions.

In addition to OMIM, PubMed is another valuable resource for finding articles and publications related to thrombophilia. PubMed is a database of scientific articles and publications, and it can be used to find additional information on the genetics and causes of thrombophilia.

In conclusion, the Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM is a valuable resource for learning about the genetic causes of thrombophilia and other rare conditions. It provides a wealth of information about the genes and genetic factors associated with this clotting disorder, as well as links to additional resources for further exploration.

Scientific Articles on PubMed

Prothrombin thrombophilia is a genetic condition associated with an increased risk of blood clots. This condition is caused by mutations in the prothrombin gene, which is involved in the clotting process. Scientific articles on PubMed provide valuable information about the frequency of these gene mutations and their association with venous thrombophilia and other clotting disorders.

PubMed is a database that catalogs scientific articles from a variety of sources. It is a valuable resource for researchers, healthcare professionals, and patients seeking information about rare genetic conditions like prothrombin thrombophilia. The articles available on PubMed provide detailed information about the inheritance patterns, genetic factors, and other causes of thrombophilia.

There are many articles available on PubMed that support the understanding of prothrombin thrombophilia. These articles include research studies, case reports, and reviews that provide valuable insights into the genetics and underlying mechanisms of this condition. They also discuss the testing methods and treatment options available for patients with prothrombin thrombophilia.

For patients and their families, PubMed articles offer a wealth of information about the condition, including the frequency of the gene mutations in the general population and the specific patient population. This information can help patients better understand their condition and make informed decisions about their healthcare.

In addition to scientific articles, PubMed also provides references to other resources, such as the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database. OMIM is a comprehensive resource that provides detailed information about rare genetic diseases, including prothrombin thrombophilia. It includes information about the genetic causes, inheritance patterns, and additional resources for patients and their families.

In summary, PubMed is an invaluable resource for learning about the genetic factors, inheritance patterns, and other causes of prothrombin thrombophilia. The scientific articles available on PubMed provide detailed information about this rare condition, supporting advocacy efforts and helping patients and healthcare professionals make informed decisions about testing, treatment, and management.

References