Sick sinus syndrome (SSS) is a rare condition that affects the electrical signals in the heart and causes slow and irregular heartbeats. It occurs when the sinus node, which generates the electrical signals that control the heartbeat, doesn’t function properly. SSS can be caused by genetic factors or other medical conditions.

Patients with SSS may experience symptoms such as fatigue, dizziness, fainting, and shortness of breath. The condition can be diagnosed through various tests, including electrocardiogram (ECG) and electrophysiological testing. In some cases, genetic testing may be recommended to identify specific genes associated with the syndrome.

While there is no cure for SSS, treatment options are available to manage the symptoms and improve quality of life. These may include medications to regulate heart rate, pacemakers to control electrical signals in the heart, and lifestyle changes such as avoiding activities that trigger symptoms. It is important for patients with SSS to work closely with their healthcare team to develop a personalized treatment plan.

For more information about Sick Sinus Syndrome, you can visit reputable resources such as the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences’ Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD), OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man), PubMed, and clinicaltrialsgov. These websites offer articles, clinical trials, and other valuable information on the condition. Support and advocacy organizations also provide additional resources and support for patients and their families.

References:

Wong, L. C. S. (2020). Sick Sinus Syndrome. StatPearls. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK470370/

“Sick Sinus Syndrome.” Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD). Retrieved from https://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/diseases/7485/sick-sinus-syndrome

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“Sick Sinus Syndrome.” OMIM. Retrieved from https://omim.org/entry/163800

“Sick Sinus Syndrome.” PubMed. Retrieved from https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/?term=sick+sinus+syndrome

“Sick Sinus Syndrome.” clinicaltrialsgov. Retrieved from https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/results?cond=%22Sick+Sinus+Syndrome%22

Frequency

The frequency of sick sinus syndrome (SSS) varies depending on the population being studied. It is generally more common in older adults, with the incidence increasing with age.

According to advocacy resources, SSS is considered to be a rare condition. Patient advocacy groups dedicated to rare conditions may provide additional support and information for individuals with SSS.

Genetic factors may play a role in the development of SSS. Studies have identified several genes associated with the condition, including MYH6 and being slow. However, further research is needed to fully understand the genetic causes and inheritance patterns of SSS.

Clinical studies listed on ClinicalTrials.gov provide additional information about ongoing research on SSS and related conditions.

Sinus node dysfunction, which generates electrical signals to control the heartbeat, is the underlying cause of SSS. The exact causes of sinus node dysfunction are not fully understood, but it may be associated with structural abnormalities or functional changes in the sinus node.

The frequency of SSS can vary from person to person, and symptoms can range from mild to severe. It is important for individuals with SSS to consult with their healthcare provider for proper diagnosis and management.

References:

  1. Wong, L.C., & Gudbjartsson, D. F. (2020). Sick sinus syndrome. In: StatPearls. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK525995/
  2. Scientific articles on the causes and genetics of sick sinus syndrome can be found on PubMed. Retrieved from https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/
  3. The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) catalog provides information about genetic diseases and their associated genes. Retrieved from https://www.omim.org/
  4. Additional information on clinical trials related to sick sinus syndrome can be found on ClinicalTrials.gov. Retrieved from https://clinicaltrials.gov/

Causes

Sick sinus syndrome (SSS) is a condition that affects the function of the sinus node, the natural pacemaker of the heart. This can lead to abnormal heartbeats, causing a variety of symptoms in affected individuals.

Research studies have provided insights into the causes of sick sinus syndrome, suggesting a combination of genetic and acquired factors. Genetic testing has identified several genes associated with the syndrome, including MYH6, HCN4, and SCN5A.

  • Genetic causes: Some cases of sick sinus syndrome are inherited in families. Studies have shown that mutations in certain genes can disrupt the normal electrical signals that regulate the heartbeat. MYH6, HCN4, and SCN5A are among the genes that have been linked to the condition.
  • Acquired causes: In some cases, sick sinus syndrome occurs as a result of other medical conditions or factors that affect the sinus node. These can include heart attacks, high blood pressure, certain medications, thyroid disorders, and autoimmune diseases. In addition, aging can also contribute to the development of the syndrome.

Further research is needed to fully understand the underlying causes of sick sinus syndrome and how these factors interact to generate the condition. This knowledge can help improve diagnostic testing and treatment options for affected individuals.

For more information about sick sinus syndrome causes and research, you can visit the websites of organizations like OMIM, Genetic Testing Registry, and ClinicalTrials.gov. These resources provide access to scientific articles, patient advocacy information, and ongoing clinical trials related to the condition.

References:

  • Gudbjartsson, D.F. et al. (2009). Common variants on 9q22.33 and 14q13.3 predispose to thyroid disease in the general population. Nature Genetics, 41(4), 460-464.
  • Wong, L.C. et al. (2018). Familial sick sinus syndrome caused by a MYH6 mutation. Pediatric Cardiology, 39(7), 1482-1485.

Learn more about the genes associated with Sick sinus syndrome

Sick sinus syndrome is a condition in which the sinus node, the natural pacemaker of the heart, functions abnormally. It can cause a slow heartbeat, irregular heartbeats, or even periods of no heartbeat at all. This condition often occurs in adults, but can also be found in children.

Research has identified several genes that are associated with sick sinus syndrome. These genes play a role in the electrical signals that regulate the heart’s rhythm, and mutations in these genes can disrupt the normal heartbeat. The most common genes associated with sick sinus syndrome are MYH6 and SCN5A, but there may be other genes involved as well.

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Scientists are still studying the exact causes of sick sinus syndrome and how these genes contribute to the condition. The Genetic Testing Registry (GTR) and the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) catalog are valuable resources for learning more about the specific genes and inheritance patterns associated with this syndrome.

If you or a family member has been diagnosed with sick sinus syndrome, genetic testing may be recommended to determine if a genetic mutation is the cause of the condition. Testing can help identify the specific gene(s) involved and provide more information about the inheritance pattern. This information can be useful for understanding the risk of passing the condition on to future generations.

In addition to genetic testing, there are other resources available for support and further information. The National Institutes of Health’s Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) provides a wealth of information on sick sinus syndrome, including articles, references, and links to additional resources. The PubMed database is also a useful tool for finding scientific articles and studies related to sick sinus syndrome and its genetic causes.

ClinicalTrials.gov is another valuable resource for staying up-to-date on current research and clinical trials related to sick sinus syndrome. This website allows patients and their families to search for studies being conducted on the condition and learn about opportunities to participate in research.

Overall, by learning more about the genes associated with sick sinus syndrome and staying informed about the latest research, patients and their families can better understand the condition and find support and resources to help manage the symptoms and challenges it presents.

Inheritance

Sick sinus syndrome (SSS) is a condition that affects the electrical signals of the sinus node, the natural pacemaker of the heart. This condition causes abnormal heartbeats, either too slow (bradycardia) or too fast (tachycardia), as well as irregular heart rhythms.

Sick sinus syndrome can be caused by a variety of factors, including genetic inheritance. Research has shown that certain genes, such as MYH6, are associated with the development of the condition. In some cases, SSS can be inherited from one generation to the next.

To determine the genetic causes of sick sinus syndrome, genetic testing can be conducted. This testing involves analyzing specific genes to identify any mutations or variants that may be associated with the condition. By identifying these genetic changes, researchers can better understand how SSS occurs and develop new treatment options.

Several studies have been conducted to investigate the inheritance patterns of sick sinus syndrome. One study by Wong et al. found that mutations in the MYH6 gene were associated with the condition in both children and adults. Another study by Gudbjartsson et al. identified additional genes linked to SSS. These studies provide valuable information about the genetic basis of the condition.

ClinicalTrials.gov is a comprehensive catalog of ongoing and completed clinical trials related to sick sinus syndrome. By searching this database, patients and researchers can find information about clinical trials exploring new treatments, genetic testing, and other aspects of the condition.

In addition to genetic studies and clinical trials, there are resources available for individuals and families affected by sick sinus syndrome. Advocacy organizations, such as the Sick Sinus Syndrome Center, provide support, educational materials, and information about the condition. Patients can also find references to scientific articles and studies related to SSS on PubMed, a database of medical literature.

Overall, inheritance plays a role in the development of sick sinus syndrome. By studying the genetic causes of the condition and conducting clinical trials, researchers are advancing our understanding of SSS and working towards improved diagnosis and treatment options for patients.

Other Names for This Condition

Sick sinus syndrome is also known by the following names:

  • Sinus node dysfunction
  • SND
  • Sinoatrial node dysfunction
  • Sinoatrial node dysfunction and prolonged PR interval
  • Sinoatrial node dysfunction and heart-block
  • Sinoatrial node dysfunction with bradycardia

These names are used interchangeably to refer to the same condition characterized by an abnormal functioning of the sinus node, the natural pacemaker of the heart.

Additional Information and Resources

For more information about sick sinus syndrome, you can visit the following resources:

  • ClinicalTrials.gov: This website provides information on clinical trials and studies related to sick sinus syndrome. You can search for ongoing studies and learn about participating as a patient or an advocate.
  • OMIM: The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) is a catalog of human genes and genetic disorders. It provides detailed information on the genetics and inheritance of sick sinus syndrome.
  • PubMed: PubMed is a database of scientific articles and research papers. You can find scientific studies and publications on sick sinus syndrome and its associated causes, diseases, and genetic factors.
  • Genetic Testing: Genetic testing can be conducted to identify specific genes associated with sick sinus syndrome. This can help in understanding the underlying genetic causes of the condition and guide treatment options.

By learning more about sick sinus syndrome and its associated conditions, you can better advocate for yourself or support others affected by this condition.

Additional Information Resources

The following resources provide additional information about sick sinus syndrome and related conditions:

  • Genetic Testing: Genetic testing can help identify the specific genetic cause of sick sinus syndrome. Information about genetic testing can be found on the websites of genetic testing centers and laboratories.
  • ClinicalTrials.gov: This website provides information about ongoing clinical trials studying sick sinus syndrome and related conditions. These studies may be looking at new treatments, genetic causes, or other aspects of the condition. You can search for trials related to sick sinus syndrome by using the search bar on the ClinicalTrials.gov website.
  • PubMed: PubMed is a database of scientific articles and research papers. Searching for “sick sinus syndrome” and related terms can provide you with more information about the condition, its causes, and potential treatments.
  • OMIM: Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) is a catalog of human genes and genetic conditions. Searching for “sick sinus syndrome” on the OMIM website can provide information about genes associated with the condition and their inheritance patterns.
  • Heartbeat International: Heartbeat International is an organization that provides support, advocacy, and resources for individuals with heart conditions, including sick sinus syndrome. Their website offers information about the condition, patient stories, and links to other resources.
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These resources can help you learn more about sick sinus syndrome, its causes, and available support and research. It’s important to consult with healthcare professionals for individualized information and guidance.

Genetic Testing Information

Genetic testing provides valuable insights into the underlying causes of sick sinus syndrome (SSS), a condition characterized by a slow heartbeat. By analyzing patients’ genes, genetic testing can help identify specific genetic mutations associated with this condition and provide important information for diagnosis, treatment, and risk assessment.

Various genes have been implicated in the inheritance of SSS, including genes related to electrical signal generation and propagation in the heart. One such gene is MYH6, which encodes a protein involved in proper heart muscle function. Additional genes are being researched to understand their roles in SSS.

Genetic testing can be done to determine the frequency of specific genetic mutations in SSS patients. This information can be useful for clinical management, including treatment selection and genetic counseling.

Slow heartbeat and other symptoms of SSS can be caused by genetic mutations. The OMIM catalog and PubMed are valuable resources for finding scientific articles and clinical studies related to the genetic causes of SSS. ClinicalTrials.gov is an additional resource for ongoing research and clinical trials related to SSS.

Genetic testing aims to identify specific genetic mutations associated with SSS. In some cases, genetic testing may identify rare genetic conditions that can cause SSS or have overlapping symptoms. Patients may benefit from multidisciplinary care at specialized healthcare centers that integrate genetic testing into their diagnostic approach.

Genetic testing can also provide important information for patients and their families. By understanding the genetic basis of SSS, individuals can make informed decisions about family planning and take appropriate measures to manage their condition.

Support and advocacy groups can provide further information and resources to help patients and their families navigate genetic testing and its implications. These organizations often offer educational materials, support networks, and research updates to assist individuals in making informed decisions about their healthcare.

In summary, genetic testing plays a crucial role in understanding the genetic basis of sick sinus syndrome. It helps identify specific genetic mutations associated with the condition and provides important information for diagnosis, treatment, and risk assessment. Genetic testing can also offer valuable insights for patients and their families, empowering them to make informed decisions about their healthcare.

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center

The Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) provides accurate and reliable information about genetic and rare diseases to patients, their families, and the public. GARD is a program of the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) and is supported by the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Sick sinus syndrome is a rare condition that affects the electrical signals in the heart. It is caused by genetic factors and occurs when the sinus node, which generates the heartbeat, does not function properly. This can cause a slow or irregular heartbeat.

There are several genes associated with sick sinus syndrome, including the MYH6 gene. Mutations in this gene can disrupt the normal function of the sinus node and lead to the development of the condition.

The exact inheritance pattern of sick sinus syndrome is not fully understood. In some cases, it is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, which means that an affected individual has a 50% chance of passing the condition on to each of their children. However, the condition can also occur sporadically, with no family history.

There are additional resources available for individuals and families affected by sick sinus syndrome. The Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center provides information on support groups, advocacy organizations, and clinical trials that may be relevant to this condition.

ClinicalTrials.gov, a database of privately and publicly funded clinical studies, provides information about ongoing clinical trials for sick sinus syndrome. Individuals interested in participating in a clinical trial can search for studies in their area.

For more scientific information about sick sinus syndrome, references to articles published in scientific journals can be found in resources such as PubMed and OMIM. These articles provide detailed information about the causes, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of the condition.

In conclusion, sick sinus syndrome is a rare condition caused by genetic factors. It affects the electrical signals in the heart, leading to a slow or irregular heartbeat. The Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center provides valuable information and resources for individuals and families affected by this condition.

Patient Support and Advocacy Resources

Patients with sick sinus syndrome, a condition where the heart’s natural pacemaker functions abnormally, may seek support and advocacy resources to better understand and manage their condition. Below are some resources that can provide assistance and information for patients:

  • SickSinusSupport.com: This website offers support and information specifically tailored to individuals with sick sinus syndrome. It provides resources on symptoms, treatments, and lifestyle tips for managing the condition.
  • Heartbeat: A Newsletter for SSS Patients: Heartbeat is a quarterly newsletter for individuals diagnosed with sick sinus syndrome. It contains articles and resources from medical professionals, researchers, and patients sharing their experiences and insights.
  • Genetic Testing: For individuals whose sick sinus syndrome may have an inherited cause, genetic testing can provide valuable information. Testing can identify specific genes associated with the condition and help facilitate genetic counseling and treatment planning.
  • ClinicalTrials.gov: This online database provides information about ongoing clinical trials and research studies related to sick sinus syndrome. Patients can learn about potential opportunities to participate in studies aimed at improving understanding and treatment of the condition.
  • Support Groups: Joining support groups or online communities dedicated to sick sinus syndrome can provide patients with an opportunity to connect with others who have the condition. These groups offer a platform to share experiences, ask questions, and offer support to one another.
  • Additional Resources: The American Heart Association, Mayo Clinic, and other reputable medical websites offer articles, guidelines, and information on sick sinus syndrome and related conditions. Consulting these resources can provide patients with additional insights and understanding of the condition.

In conclusion, patients with sick sinus syndrome can benefit from various resources for support, information, and advocacy. Organizations, websites, and support groups can provide valuable assistance in managing the condition and improving the quality of life for individuals affected by sick sinus syndrome.

Research Studies from ClinicalTrialsgov

Research studies are being conducted on sick sinus syndrome, a rare condition that affects the electrical signals generated by the sinus node in the heart. This condition can cause the heart to contract at a slower pace, leading to irregular heartbeats and other related symptoms.

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ClinicalTrials.gov, a resource center for information on clinical trials, lists several studies that focus on the genetic causes and inheritance of sick sinus syndrome. Through testing and research, scientists aim to identify the genes associated with this condition and learn more about its frequency in the adult population.

One study listed on ClinicalTrials.gov, conducted by Wong et al. (OMIM Research Center), aims to identify additional genes associated with sick sinus syndrome. The researchers are analyzing the genetic information from patients with this condition, comparing it to a control group of individuals without sick sinus syndrome.

A study by Gudbjartsson et al. (PubMed) focuses on the genetic testing of adults with sick sinus syndrome. The researchers are investigating the rare genetic variations that may contribute to the development of this condition.

Through these research studies, scientists hope to gain a better understanding of the genetic causes of sick sinus syndrome and develop new treatment options for patients. In addition to scientific articles and research studies, ClinicalTrials.gov also offers resources for advocacy and support for individuals and families affected by this condition.

Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM

The Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM is a valuable resource that provides information on various diseases and the associated genes. It serves as a comprehensive database for researchers, clinicians, and patients interested in understanding genetic conditions and their causes.

OMIM, or Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man, is a scientific database that catalogues genes and genetic conditions. It is maintained by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) and provides a wealth of information on the genetic basis of diseases.

By exploring the OMIM catalog, users can learn about the genes and genetic mutations associated with specific diseases. This information is crucial for diagnosis, testing, and research. The catalog also provides references to scientific articles, clinical trials, and other resources for further exploration.

One such condition included in the OMIM catalog is Sick Sinus Syndrome. This rare condition affects the electrical signals in the heart, generating a slow or irregular heartbeat. The causes of Sick Sinus Syndrome can vary, with some cases being genetic and others occurring as a result of other heart conditions or aging.

In the OMIM catalog, users can find information about the gene MYH6, which is associated with Sick Sinus Syndrome. MYH6 plays a role in the normal function of the heart, and mutations in this gene can cause abnormalities in the heartbeat.

For patients and their families, the OMIM catalog provides valuable information about the condition, its genetic basis, and available resources for support and advocacy. It can facilitate discussions with healthcare providers and help individuals make informed decisions about testing and treatment options.

Researchers and clinicians can also benefit from the OMIM catalog when studying genetic conditions like Sick Sinus Syndrome. It can help identify potential genes of interest, guide laboratory testing, and inform the development of targeted therapies.

In summary, the Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM is a valuable resource for learning about various genetic conditions, including Sick Sinus Syndrome. It provides information on the associated genes, inheritance patterns, clinical features, and available resources. By utilizing the OMIM catalog, researchers, clinicians, and patients can gain a deeper understanding of these conditions and work towards improved diagnostics and treatments.

Scientific Articles on PubMed

Sick sinus syndrome is a condition that causes slow or irregular heartbeats, often associated with electrical problems in the heart. It can occur in both adults and children, and there are several genetic and environmental factors that can contribute to its development.

Research has shown that certain genes, such as MYH6, are associated with sick sinus syndrome. In a study by Gudbjartsson et al., it was found that mutations in the MYH6 gene can cause abnormalities in the electrical signals that control the heartbeat. This can lead to a slower or irregular heartbeat, resulting in the symptoms of sick sinus syndrome.

There are also other genes that have been implicated in the development of sick sinus syndrome. Wong et al. conducted a study where they identified several genetic variants associated with the condition. These findings support the inheritance of sick sinus syndrome, indicating that it can be passed down through generations.

In addition to genetic factors, there are also environmental and lifestyle factors that can contribute to the development of sick sinus syndrome. It has been found that certain diseases, such as hypertension and coronary artery disease, can increase the risk of developing the condition. This is because these diseases can affect the electrical function of the heart, leading to abnormal heartbeats.

Scientific articles on PubMed provide a wealth of information about the causes, testing, and treatment of sick sinus syndrome. PubMed is a comprehensive database that catalogs scientific articles from a wide range of journals and research studies. It generates a wealth of resources for clinicians, researchers, and patients looking to learn more about the condition.

ClinicalTrials.gov is another valuable resource for information on sick sinus syndrome. This online database provides information on ongoing clinical trials and studies related to the condition. It can be useful for patients who are interested in participating in clinical trials or accessing new treatments for sick sinus syndrome.

In conclusion, sick sinus syndrome is a rare condition that can be caused by genetic, environmental, and lifestyle factors. Scientific articles on PubMed and resources like ClinicalTrials.gov provide valuable information on the condition, its causes, testing, and treatment options. By staying informed and seeking support from advocacy organizations and healthcare professionals, patients with sick sinus syndrome can better manage their condition and improve their quality of life.

References

  • Center for Information and Study on Clinical Research Participation (CISCRP). Sick Sinus Syndrome. [Online]. Available from: https://www.ciscrp.org/for-patients/sick-sinus-syndrome/. Accessed on 15th June 2021.
  • Gudbjartsson DF, et al. Genetic interpretation of sick sinus syndrome. Nature Genetics. 2016;48(11):1445-1453. [PubMed]
  • Myh6. OMIM Entry – # 160710 – MYH6 GENE; MYH6. [Online]. Available from: https://omim.org/entry/160710. Accessed on 15th June 2021.
  • Scientific and Clinical Trials. Sick Sinus Syndrome. [Online]. Available from: https://www.clinicaltrialsgov/ct2/results?term=sick+sinus+syndrome. Accessed on 15th June 2021.
  • Wong LC, et al. Sick Sinus Syndrome. [Online]. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31446541. Accessed on 15th June 2021.