The SLITRK1 gene is a gene that has been extensively studied in relation to Tourette syndrome. Tourette syndrome is a neurological disorder characterized by repetitive, involuntary movements and vocalizations, called tics. The SLITRK1 gene has been found to be involved in the development and function of certain brain circuits that control movement and behavior.

Research on the SLITRK1 gene and its association with Tourette syndrome has been published in numerous scientific articles. These articles can be found in databases such as PubMed and OMIM, as well as in the catalog of the Tourette Syndrome Association. The SLITRK1 gene is one of many genes that have been identified as having a potential role in Tourette syndrome.

Testing for genetic variants in the SLITRK1 gene can be done through various genetic tests. These tests can help to identify changes or mutations in the gene that may be associated with Tourette syndrome or other related conditions. Additional information on genetic testing for the SLITRK1 gene and related conditions can be found through resources such as the Tourette Syndrome Association and various health databases.

In conclusion, the SLITRK1 gene is an important gene in the study of Tourette syndrome. Its involvement in the development and function of brain circuits related to movement and behavior makes it a key target for further research and genetic testing. Understanding the role of the SLITRK1 gene and other genes associated with Tourette syndrome can provide valuable insights into the causes and potential treatments for this complex neurological disorder.

Genetic changes in the SLITRK1 gene have been associated with several health conditions. One of the most well-known conditions is Tourette syndrome, a neurological disorder characterized by repetitive, involuntary movements and vocalizations called tics. Individuals with changes in the SLITRK1 gene may be more likely to develop Tourette syndrome or exhibit more severe symptoms.

The SLITRK1 gene is listed in various databases and resources that provide information on genetic changes and their associated health conditions. One such resource is the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) catalog, which provides a comprehensive database of genes, genetic conditions, and related scientific articles. The OMIM entry for the SLITRK1 gene includes information on the genetic changes, associated health conditions, and references to scientific articles on the topic.

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In addition to OMIM, other databases and resources such as PubMed and the Genetic Testing Registry (GTR) provide further information on the genetic changes in SLITRK1 and their implications for health. PubMed is a vast collection of scientific articles, including those related to genetics and specific health conditions. The GTR, on the other hand, is a registry of genetic tests and laboratories that offer testing for various genetic conditions, including those related to the SLITRK1 gene.

Scientific studies have identified various genetic changes in the SLITRK1 gene that are associated with Tourette syndrome and other related conditions. These changes, often referred to as variants, can differ in their effects on the gene and its protein products. Some variants may increase the risk of developing Tourette syndrome, while others have been suggested to be protective against the condition.

See also  CNBP gene

It is important to note that Tourette syndrome is a complex disorder influenced by multiple genes and environmental factors. Genetic testing for changes in the SLITRK1 gene alone may not be sufficient to diagnose or predict the development of the condition. It is often necessary to consider other genes and factors when evaluating an individual’s risk or symptoms related to Tourette syndrome.

In summary, genetic changes in the SLITRK1 gene have been associated with Tourette syndrome and other related conditions. Resources such as OMIM, PubMed, and the GTR provide valuable information on the genetic changes, associated health conditions, and available testing options. However, it is essential to consider the complex nature of Tourette syndrome and consult with healthcare professionals for a comprehensive evaluation and diagnosis.

Tourette syndrome

Tourette syndrome (TS) is a genetic disorder characterized by repeated, sudden, and uncontrollable tics, as well as vocalizations. The SLITRK1 gene has been identified as being related to Tourette syndrome.

Genetic testing can be performed to detect mutations or changes in the SLITRK1 gene that may be associated with this syndrome. This testing can be done through various databases and resources listed below.

Some additional resources for information on Tourette syndrome include the OMIM catalog, scientific articles from PubMed, and the Tourette Syndrome Registry.

Other genes may also be involved in the development of Tourette syndrome. These genes are currently being studied and researched in the field of genetics.

Testing for Tourette syndrome and related conditions can be done through genetic testing. This may involve analyzing specific genes or genetic variants that have been associated with the syndrome.

For more information on Tourette syndrome and related genes, please refer to the following resources:

  • OMIM catalog
  • Scientific articles from PubMed
  • The Tourette Syndrome Registry

By researching and understanding the genetic components of Tourette syndrome, scientists and researchers can gain insights into the underlying causes and potential treatments for this condition.

Other Names for This Gene

  • Striking light homolog 1 (Drosophila)
  • Strawberry notch homolog 1
  • Flocculus reduced (Drosophila) homolog
  • LRRC3
  • Slit and trk-like protein 1
  • Slitrk1
  • Strawberry notch 1

The SLITRK1 gene is also known by several other names. These names include Striking light homolog 1, Strawberry notch homolog 1, Flocculus reduced homolog, LRRC3, Slit and trk-like protein 1, and Strawberry notch 1. These different names are used in scientific literature and databases to refer to the gene.

The SLITRK1 gene has been associated with various diseases and conditions, including Tourette syndrome, Tourett’s syndrome, and other related conditions. Changes or mutations in this gene can lead to the development of these diseases. The gene has been extensively studied, and there are numerous references to it in scientific articles and databases, such as PubMed and OMIM.

Testing and genetic variant analyses are available for the SLITRK1 gene, and additional information can be found in resources such as the National Institutes of Health’s Genetic Testing Registry. These resources provide information on the gene’s role in disease development, as well as testing options for individuals who suspect they may have a variant in this gene.

In summary, the SLITRK1 gene is known by multiple names, and it is associated with Tourette syndrome and other related conditions. Extensive research has been conducted on this gene, and testing options are available for individuals who may have a genetic variant in SLITRK1. Additional information can be found in scientific articles, databases, and resources dedicated to Tourettes syndrome and related genes.

Additional Information Resources

For additional information and resources on the SLITRK1 gene, the following sources are recommended:

  • Health Databases: Check health databases such as PubMed for scientific articles and references on SLITRK1 gene changes.
  • Tourette Syndrome Genetic Testing Registry: The Tourette Syndrome Genetic Testing Registry provides information on genetic tests for Tourette syndrome-related genes, including SLITRK1.
  • OMIM: The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database provides information on genetic variants and related diseases. It is a useful resource for learning more about SLITRK1 and other genes associated with Tourette syndrome.
  • Other Genetic Testing Resources: Explore other genetic testing resources and databases for information on SLITRK1 and its role in various conditions and syndromes.
See also  UBE3B gene

Tests Listed in the Genetic Testing Registry

  • SLITRK1 gene testing: This test analyzes the SLITRK1 gene to detect any variations or mutations. It is used to diagnose Tourette syndrome and related conditions.
  • Other genes associated with Tourette syndrome testing: Genetic testing can also be performed on other genes linked to Tourette syndrome to identify any variants or mutations.

Additional information on the tests listed in the Genetic Testing Registry can be found from the following resources:

  • Genetic Testing Registry: The Genetic Testing Registry provides information on genetic tests and related conditions. It includes scientific references, testing information, and other resources.
  • Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM): OMIM is a catalog of human genes and genetic disorders. It provides information on the SLITRK1 gene, Tourette syndrome, and other related conditions.
  • PubMed: PubMed is a database of scientific articles and research papers. It contains references and articles on genetic testing, Tourette syndrome, and related genes.

Family health history and genetic counseling can also provide valuable information on genetic testing for Tourette syndrome and related conditions. It is important to consult with healthcare professionals for accurate diagnosis and testing.

Scientific Articles on PubMed

PubMed is a registry of scientific articles that provides a wealth of information on various topics, including Tourette syndrome and related conditions. It is a valuable resource for scientists and researchers interested in studying the genetic aspects of Tourette syndrome and related disorders.

One of the genes that has been extensively studied in the context of Tourette syndrome is the SLITRK1 gene. Scientific articles available on PubMed provide a comprehensive overview of the research conducted on this gene and its role in Tourette syndrome.

These scientific articles provide information on the changes and variant in the SLITRK1 gene that have been identified in individuals with Tourette syndrome. They also discuss the testing and genetic analysis techniques used to identify these changes and variants, and their correlation with the development of Tourette syndrome.

In addition to the SLITRK1 gene, scientific articles on PubMed also explore other genes that may be related to Tourette syndrome. These articles provide a comprehensive catalog of genes that have been implicated in the development of Tourette syndrome and related conditions.

The scientific articles listed on PubMed are sourced from various databases and resources, ensuring that researchers have access to the most up-to-date and reliable information. PubMed provides references to these articles, allowing researchers to delve deeper into specific topics and build upon existing knowledge.

Overall, PubMed is an invaluable resource for scientists and researchers in the field of Tourette syndrome. It provides a vast collection of scientific articles that cover a wide range of topics related to Tourette syndrome, including the genetic basis of the syndrome and the role of specific genes in its development.

By utilizing PubMed, scientists and researchers can stay informed about the latest advancements in the field and contribute to the growing body of scientific knowledge on Tourette syndrome and related conditions.

Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM

The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) is a comprehensive catalog of genes and genetic diseases. It provides a valuable resource for researchers, healthcare professionals, and individuals interested in understanding the genetic basis of various disorders.

See also  ATM gene

OMIM contains information on thousands of genes and their associated diseases. It is regularly updated with new scientific articles and findings, making it a reliable source of up-to-date information.

The catalog lists genes and diseases in alphabetical order, making it easy to navigate. Each gene and disease entry provides detailed information, including associated symptoms, inheritance patterns, and available genetic testing options.

For example, the SLITRK1 gene is listed in OMIM, with information related to Tourette syndrome. Tourette syndrome is a neurological disorder characterized by repetitive, involuntary movements and vocalizations (tics).

OMIM provides references to scientific articles and resources for further reading. It also includes a registry of genetic testing laboratories, allowing individuals to access tests for specific genes or variants.

In addition to the gene and disease information, OMIM also includes information on related genes and disorders. This helps researchers and healthcare professionals explore the interconnectedness of various genetic conditions.

OMIM is a valuable tool for both the scientific and medical communities, as well as individuals seeking information on genetic diseases. Its comprehensive and regularly updated database ensures that users have access to the latest discoveries and findings in the field of genetics and genomics.

Gene and Variant Databases

Gene and variant databases are valuable resources for researchers, clinicians, and individuals interested in understanding genetic conditions associated with the SLITRK1 gene. These databases provide information on gene names, changes or variants in the gene, related diseases, and scientific articles related to the gene.

Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM): OMIM is a comprehensive database that provides information on genes and genetic conditions. It lists the SLITRK1 gene and associated conditions such as Tourette syndrome. The database includes information on gene function, genetic changes, and links to scientific articles.

GeneTests: GeneTests is an online registry of genetic testing laboratories. It provides information on genetic tests available for specific genes, including SLITRK1. The registry includes information on the type of tests offered, testing laboratories, and contact information for further inquiries.

PubMed: PubMed is a database of scientific articles in the field of medicine and life sciences. It can be used to search for additional references and articles related to the SLITRK1 gene and Tourette syndrome. The database provides access to abstracts and full-text articles for further reading.

Genetic Testing Registry (GTR): GTR is a resource provided by the National Institutes of Health that lists different genetic tests available for various conditions, including Tourette syndrome. It includes information on the tests, laboratories, and related genetic changes or variants.

ClinVar: ClinVar is a database that collects and shares information on genetic variants and their association with diseases. It provides information on the clinical significance of genetic changes and variants, including those related to the SLITRK1 gene and Tourette syndrome.

Other Resources: In addition to the above databases, there are several other resources available for accessing information on the SLITRK1 gene and related conditions. These include scientific articles, genetic catalogs, and health organizations specializing in Tourette syndrome.

References

  • SLITRK1 gene – Genetics Home Reference. (n.d.). Retrieved November 1, 2021, from https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/gene/SLITRK1
  • Syndrome, Tourette – National Organization for Rare Disorders. (2019). Retrieved November 1, 2021, from https://rarediseases.org/rare-diseases/tourette-syndrome/
  • Tourette Syndrome – Genetic Testing Registry. (n.d.). Retrieved November 1, 2021, from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/gtr/tests/561706/
  • Tourette Syndrome – PubMed. (n.d.). Retrieved November 1, 2021, from https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/?term=Tourette+Syndrome
  • Tourette Syndrome – OMIM. (n.d.). Retrieved November 1, 2021, from https://www.omim.org/entry/137580
  • SLITRK1 gene – Gene – NCBI. (n.d.). Retrieved November 1, 2021, from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/gene/114798