Sporadic hemiplegic migraine (SHM) is a rare form of migraine with aura that is characterized by temporary paralysis or weakness on one side of the body. This condition is different from other types of migraines because it is associated with a genetic mutation.

SHM is a rare condition, and there are limited resources available to learn more about it. One valuable resource is the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) catalog, which provides detailed genetic information for various diseases, including SHM. These resources provide information on the genetic causes, inheritance patterns, and associated symptoms of the condition.

The frequency of SHM attacks can vary from person to person. Some individuals may experience symptoms only once or twice in their lifetime, while others may have more frequent attacks. The exact causes of SHM are not fully understood, but scientific research suggests that certain genes, called hemiplegic migraine genes, play a role in the development of the condition.

Patients with SHM often have a family history of migraines, indicating a genetic predisposition to the condition. The aura experienced before the onset of the headache can include visual disturbances, sensory disturbances, and difficulty speaking. These symptoms usually last for a short time before the headache begins.

Diagnosis of SHM can be challenging due to the overlapping symptoms with other conditions. It is important for individuals experiencing these symptoms to seek medical evaluation from a healthcare professional with expertise in migraines. Additional references and support can be found at the Migraine Research Foundation and the American Migraine Foundation.

Frequency

Sporadic hemiplegic migraine (SHM) is a rare form of migraine that affects a small percentage of the population. It is estimated to occur in approximately 0.01% to 0.05% of individuals, making it a very uncommon condition. The frequency of SHM varies from person to person, with some individuals experiencing sporadic episodes and others having a more frequent occurrence.

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The name “sporadic” suggests that the condition occurs unpredictably and without a clear pattern. Some individuals may experience sporadic hemiplegic migraines only once or a few times in their lifetime, while others may have more frequent episodes. The frequency of episodes can also vary within an individual, with periods of remission interspersed with periods of increased symptom occurrence.

Sporadic hemiplegic migraines are often associated with a family history of migraines, although they can also occur in individuals without a family history of the condition. In rare cases, sporadic hemiplegic migraines can be caused by specific genetic mutations. These mutations affect genes involved in ion channel function and neurotransmitter transportation.

It is important for patients with sporadic hemiplegic migraines to seek support and information from reliable sources such as medical centers, migraine advocacy organizations, and reputable websites. These resources can provide more information about the condition, its causes, and available treatment options. Additionally, patients may find it helpful to connect with others who have similar experiences through support groups or online communities.

For more information on sporadic hemiplegic migraine, patients and healthcare providers can refer to the OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) catalog. This comprehensive catalog provides a wealth of information on genes, diseases, and inheritance patterns. PubMed is another valuable resource for accessing research articles on the topic. Searching for keywords such as “sporadic hemiplegic migraine” or “SHM” can yield relevant articles from scientific journals such as Neurology.

In conclusion, sporadic hemiplegic migraine is a rare and unpredictable condition with varying frequency of episodes. It can be associated with genetic mutations or occur sporadically without a known cause. Patients and healthcare providers can learn more about this condition from reputable resources and seek support from advocacy groups and other individuals experiencing similar symptoms.

Causes

Sporadic hemiplegic migraine is a rare condition with genetic causes. Several genes have been associated with this condition, and their names can be found in a catalog of genetic diseases called OMIM.

The genes associated with sporadic hemiplegic migraine can be found in articles on PubMed, which is a database that provides scientific articles and other information. The inheritance pattern of this condition is not well understood, but it is called sporadic because it often occurs in individuals without a family history of the disease.

Patient advocacy groups and rare disease resources can provide additional information and support for individuals with sporadic hemiplegic migraine. These organizations can also provide information about the common symptoms and frequency of migraine attacks.

In addition to the genetic causes, there may be other factors that contribute to the development of sporadic hemiplegic migraine. For example, research has shown that disruptions in ion transport and calcium signaling may play a role in this condition.

More research is needed to fully understand the causes of sporadic hemiplegic migraine and to develop effective treatments. Scientists are continuing to study the genetic and environmental factors that may contribute to this condition.

See also  LMNA gene

In summary, sporadic hemiplegic migraine is a rare form of migraine with genetic causes. Genetic studies have identified several genes associated with this condition, and disruptions in ion transport and calcium signaling may also play a role. Patient advocacy groups and rare disease resources can provide additional information and support for individuals affected by this condition.

Learn more about the genes associated with Sporadic hemiplegic migraine

Sporadic hemiplegic migraine (SHM) is a rare genetic condition that causes severe migraines with aura and temporary paralysis on one side of the body. It is a neurological disorder that can result in difficulty with movement and transport. The exact causes of SHM are not fully understood, but research has identified several genes that are associated with this condition.

One of the genes associated with SHM is the ATP1A2 gene, which is responsible for producing a protein involved in ion transport. Mutations in this gene can disrupt the normal functioning of brain cells and lead to the symptoms of SHM. Another gene associated with SHM is CACNA1A, which is involved in the regulation of calcium channels in the brain.

These and other genes associated with SHM have been identified through scientific studies and genetic research. The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) catalog is a valuable resource for learning more about the genetic basis of SHM. It provides information on the frequency of the condition, inheritance patterns, and additional scientific and patient resources.

In addition to the OMIM catalog, there are other resources available for learning more about the genes associated with SHM. PubMed is a database that contains a vast collection of scientific articles on various topics, including genetic diseases. Searching for “Sporadic hemiplegic migraine” or the specific genes associated with the condition can provide more information and references to relevant studies.

Support and advocacy organizations for migraine disorders, such as the Migraine Research Foundation and the American Migraine Foundation, also provide information and resources on sporadic hemiplegic migraine and its genetic components. These organizations can help individuals affected by SHM find support and connect with other individuals with the condition.

In conclusion, the genetic basis of sporadic hemiplegic migraine is complex, and multiple genes are associated with this condition. Learning more about these genes and the underlying genetic mechanisms can provide valuable insights for understanding the causes and potential treatments for SHM.

Inheritance

Hemiplegic migraines are a rare form of migraines that are associated with weakness or paralysis on one side of the body. They are considered a subtype of migraines with aura, which is a condition characterized by sensory disturbances or visual disturbances that occur before the onset of a headache. Inheritance of sporadic hemiplegic migraines is not well understood and can vary among individuals.

Scientific research has identified several genes that are associated with sporadic hemiplegic migraines. These genes play a role in ion transport, which is the movement of charged particles across cell membranes. Mutations in these genes can disrupt normal ion transport and lead to the development of migraines with aura.

One of the genes that has been implicated in the inheritance of sporadic hemiplegic migraines is called the CACNA1A gene. Mutations in this gene are also associated with other neurological diseases, such as episodic ataxia and familial hemiplegic migraine. Additional genes, such as ATP1A2 and SCN1A, have also been identified as potential genetic causes of sporadic hemiplegic migraines.

In general, the inheritance of sporadic hemiplegic migraines follows an autosomal dominant pattern, which means that a person with a mutation in one copy of the relevant gene has a 50% chance of passing the mutation on to each of their children. However, sporadic cases of hemiplegic migraines can also occur without a family history of the condition.

There is limited information available on the specific inheritance patterns of sporadic hemiplegic migraines, and more research is needed to fully understand the genetic factors involved. The Hemiplegic Migraine Genetic Mutation database is a valuable resource for information on genes associated with hemiplegic migraines. It includes a catalog of genetic variants and references to scientific articles on the topic.

Patient advocacy organizations, such as the Sporadic Hemiplegic Migraine Foundation, can also provide support and additional information on the inheritance and management of sporadic hemiplegic migraines.

Other Names for This Condition

Sporadic hemiplegic migraine (SHM) is a type of migraine with aura that causes temporary paralysis or weakness on one side of the body. It is also known as familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) type 2 when it is inherited from a parent or relative.

There are several other names associated with this condition:

  • Hemiplegic migraine
  • Familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM)
  • Hemiplegic migraine, autosomal dominant
  • Hemiplegic migraine, familial type 2
  • Familial hemiplegic migraine type 2
  • Familial hemiplegic migraine type 2A
  • Hemiplegic migraine, sporadic type
  • Sporadic hemiplegic migraine without cerebellar ataxia
  • Hemiplegic migraine, pure

These names may vary in different sources and medical literature.

For more detailed information about sporadic hemiplegic migraine and other associated diseases, the following resources can be consulted:

  1. Neurol Genes Catalog (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/projects/SNP/snp_ref.cgi?from=summary&geneId=7578)
  2. OMIM database (http://omim.org)
  3. PubMed – a scientific research database (https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/)
  4. The Migraine Research Foundation (https://migraineresearchfoundation.org/)

These resources provide additional information on the genetic and scientific aspects of sporadic hemiplegic migraine, as well as support and advocacy for patients and their families affected by this condition.

See also  Klippel-Feil syndrome

Additional Information Resources

For additional information on sporadic hemiplegic migraine and related diseases, the following resources may be helpful:

  • OMIM: The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) catalog provides a comprehensive list of genes and associated genetic disorders, including sporadic hemiplegic migraine. You can find more information on the genetic inheritance and common genes associated with this condition here.
  • PubMed: PubMed is a scientific database that contains a wealth of articles on various diseases, including sporadic hemiplegic migraine. You can search for articles on the frequency, genetic inheritance, and other aspects of this condition here.
  • Headache Center: The Headache Center is a specialized medical center that focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of various types of headaches, including sporadic hemiplegic migraine. You can learn more about this condition and find resources for patients here.
  • Advocacy Organizations: There are several advocacy organizations that provide support for individuals with sporadic hemiplegic migraine and their families. These organizations can offer information, resources, and assistance in navigating the challenges of living with this rare condition. Some of these organizations include the Stefansson Memorial Research Institute and the Migraine Research Foundation.

By accessing these resources, you can learn more about the history, symptoms, genetic factors, and treatment options for sporadic hemiplegic migraine. Additionally, these resources can provide information on other related diseases and conditions that may be associated with migraines and genetic inheritance.

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center

The Genetic and Rare Diseases (GARD) Information Center provides reliable and comprehensive information about rare diseases, including Sporadic Hemiplegic Migraine (SHM). SHM is a rare genetic condition that causes episodes of paralysis or weakness on one side of the body, accompanied by migraine headaches.

SHM is a type of migraine with aura, but it is distinguished from other types of migraines by its unique symptoms and genetic inheritance. It is called “sporadic” because it occurs sporadically in individuals with no family history of the condition. However, in some cases, SHM may be inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, meaning that a person only needs to inherit one copy of the mutated gene from either parent to develop the condition.

The GARD Information Center provides a wealth of resources for patients and their families affected by SHM. This includes information about the causes, signs and symptoms, diagnosis, treatment options, and prognosis of SHM. It also provides links to additional scientific articles and references for those who seek more in-depth and technical information about the condition.

One of the most common genes associated with SHM is CACNA1A, mutations in which are found in about 50% of patients with SHM. Other genes that have been implicated in SHM include ATP1A2 and SCN1A. These genes are involved in ion transport and neuronal function, and mutations in these genes can disrupt the normal electrical activity in the brain, leading to the development of migraines and associated symptoms.

Individuals with SHM often experience severe and debilitating migraine headaches, which can be accompanied by visual disturbances, difficulty speaking, and other neurological symptoms. The frequency and severity of these episodes can vary widely from person to person. Some individuals may have frequent and intense episodes, while others may experience them only sporadically.

In addition to providing information about SHM, the GARD Information Center also offers support and advocacy resources for individuals and families affected by rare diseases. This includes links to patient support groups, advocacy organizations, and clinical trials that may be relevant to those with SHM.

For more information about sporadic hemiplegic migraine, you can visit the GARD Information Center website or search for relevant articles on PubMed and Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM).

References:

  1. Stefansson H, Steinberg S, Petursson H, et al. Variant in the sequence of the L-type voltage-gated calcium channel CACNA1A [calcium channel, voltage-dependent, P/Q type, alpha 1A subunit] confer susceptibility to migraine with aura. Nat Genet. 2005;37(8):769-77.
  2. Stam AH, Luijckx GJ, Poll The BT, et al. Early seizures and cerebral oedema after trivial head trauma associated with the CACNA1A S218L mutation. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2008;79(9):1080-1.
  3. Carreno O, Corominas R, Fernandez-Morales J, et al. Mutational analysis of ATP1A2 and SCN1A genes in families with Sporadic Hemiplegic Migraine. Cephalalgia. 2011;31(6):650-60.

Patient Support and Advocacy Resources

Patients diagnosed with sporadic hemiplegic migraine can benefit from a range of support and advocacy resources. These resources aim to provide patients with information, support, and a platform to share their experiences and challenges.

Here are some patient support and advocacy resources that can help individuals learn more about sporadic hemiplegic migraine and related conditions:

  • OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man): OMIM is a comprehensive catalog of genetic diseases and related genes. It provides information on the genetic basis of sporadic hemiplegic migraine and associated migraines.
  • Sporadic Hemiplegic Migraine Articles on PubMed: PubMed is a scientific database that contains a wide range of research articles. Searching for “sporadic hemiplegic migraine” on PubMed can provide more information about the condition, its causes, and associated genes.
  • The National Headache Foundation: The National Headache Foundation is a patient advocacy organization that provides support and information for individuals with various types of migraines, including sporadic hemiplegic migraine. Their website offers resources, educational materials, and a support center for patients.
  • Migraine Research Foundation: The Migraine Research Foundation aims to improve the understanding and treatment of migraines through research. Their website provides information about migraine types, including sporadic hemiplegic migraine, and offers support for patients.
  • Migraine Aura Foundation: The Migraine Aura Foundation focuses on supporting individuals with migraines that are accompanied by aura. They offer resources, a community forum, and educational materials for patients with hemiplegic migraines.
See also  JPH3 gene

These resources can provide patients with valuable information about sporadic hemiplegic migraine, its genetic basis, associated signs and symptoms, and treatment options. They also offer a platform for patients to connect with others who may be experiencing similar challenges and difficulties.

It is important for patients to consult with healthcare professionals for an accurate diagnosis, appropriate treatment, and personalized advice. These patient support and advocacy resources can complement medical guidance and help individuals navigate the challenges associated with sporadic hemiplegic migraine.

Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM

OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) is a valuable resource for learning about genetic diseases and genes. It provides a comprehensive catalog of genes and their associated diseases. In the context of sporadic hemiplegic migraine, OMIM offers additional information on the genetic causes and inheritance patterns of this rare condition.

Sporadic hemiplegic migraine is a rare form of migraine with aura that causes episodes of weakness or paralysis on one side of the body. OMIM’s catalog includes genes that are associated with this condition, providing more insight into its genetic basis.

By exploring the catalog, patients and researchers can discover more about the genes that are involved in sporadic hemiplegic migraine and other related diseases. The names of these genes, along with their associated diseases, are listed in an organized manner.

OMIM offers support in the form of scientific articles and references from PubMed, a database of biomedical literature. These resources provide more information on the genes and diseases listed in the catalog.

For those seeking additional resources, OMIM also provides links to advocacy groups and organizations that specialize in rare genetic conditions. These groups can offer support, information, and assistance for individuals affected by sporadic hemiplegic migraine and other genetic disorders.

Genes Diseases
Gene 1 Disease 1
Gene 2 Disease 2
Gene 3 Disease 3

The catalog of genes and diseases from OMIM is a valuable resource for those interested in learning more about the genetic basis of sporadic hemiplegic migraine and related conditions. It offers a comprehensive collection of genes and their associated diseases, providing a deeper understanding of the underlying mechanisms of these disorders.

Scientific Articles on PubMed

PubMed is a popular online database that provides access to a vast collection of scientific articles. It serves as a valuable resource for researchers and healthcare professionals seeking information on various medical conditions, including sporadic hemiplegic migraine. With its wide range of articles, PubMed offers a comprehensive understanding of the genetic and inheritance aspects of this condition.

Through scientific studies, researchers have revealed that sporadic hemiplegic migraine can be inherited. This means that the condition can be passed down from parents to their children. To understand more about the genetic basis of sporadic hemiplegic migraine and the genes associated with it, researchers have conducted numerous studies.

One such study, conducted by Stefansson et al., explored the genetic factors contributing to sporadic hemiplegic migraine. The researchers identified specific genes, called “transport genes,” that play a crucial role in the condition. Their findings provided valuable information about the underlying mechanisms and potential causes of sporadic hemiplegic migraine.

For patients and their families seeking additional information and support for sporadic hemiplegic migraine, there are advocacy and support groups available. These organizations and centers provide resources, education, and guidance to individuals affected by this rare condition. Patients can find assistance in managing the symptoms, understanding the genetic implications, and connecting with other individuals going through a similar experience.

Patients and healthcare professionals can also refer to other scientific articles available on PubMed to learn more about sporadic hemiplegic migraine and its associated genetic conditions. The database includes a vast catalog of studies that provide insights into the history, causes, frequency, and difficulty of diagnosing sporadic hemiplegic migraine. This information can help improve understanding and contribute to the development of more effective treatment options for individuals with this condition.

In summary, PubMed offers a wealth of scientific articles on various medical conditions, including sporadic hemiplegic migraine. Researchers and healthcare professionals can access information about the genetic inheritance, genes associated with the condition, and additional resources for patients. PubMed serves as a valuable resource for scientific information and learning about rare genetic diseases.

References

  • Aura and Frequency: Sporadic Hemiplegic Migraine. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.ahcmedia.com/articles/19760-aura-and-frequency-sporadic-hemiplegic-migraine
  • Transport Genes: The Genetics Home Reference. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/sporadic-hemiplegic-migraine
  • Rare Migraine: Sporadic Hemiplegic Migraine. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.achenet.org/resources/sporadic-hemiplegic-migraine/
  • Inheritance and Difficulty: Sporadic Hemiplegic Migraine. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://rarediseases.org/rare-diseases/sporadic-hemiplegic-migraine/
  • Additional Information: Stefansson, H., Rye, D. B., Hicks, A., Petursson, H., Ingason, A., Gulcher, J. R., … & Sigmundsson, T. (2007). A genetic risk factor for periodic limb movements in sleep. New England Journal of Medicine, 357(7), 639-647.

For more articles and scientific information about sporadic hemiplegic migraines, additional resources and advocacy, you can visit the following websites:

  • PubMed – a comprehensive catalog of scientific articles
  • OMIM – a database of genes and genetic conditions
  • AHC Media – an online resource for medical information
  • Genetic Alliance – an advocacy organization for individuals and families affected by genetic conditions