Zellweger spectrum disorder (ZSD) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by the malfunctioning of peroxisomes, small organelles found in cells. The disorder falls under the category of peroxisomal biogenesis disorders (PBDs) and is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner.

ZSD was first described in medical literature in 1964 by Hans Zellweger, and since then, numerous studies have been conducted to understand the condition better. The disorder is caused by mutations in genes that are essential for the formation and function of peroxisomes. The most common gene associated with ZSD is PEX1.

Individuals with ZSD exhibit a wide range of symptoms, including hearing and vision loss, developmental delay, and learning disabilities. Additional signs and symptoms may include liver dysfunction, skeletal abnormalities, and seizures. As a rare disorder, ZSD has a frequency of 1 in 50,000 to 100,000 live births. It is important for clinicians and geneticists to have access to reliable information and resources to better understand ZSD and provide appropriate care and support to affected individuals.

There are several databases and resources available for gathering information about ZSD, including PubMed, OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man), and the Zellweger Spectrum Disorder Patient Registry. These resources provide a catalog of genes associated with ZSD, scientific articles, clinical studies, and other relevant information.

Genetic testing is crucial for the diagnosis of ZSD and can help identify the specific gene mutation responsible for the disorder in each patient. This information is essential for genetic counseling and may also aid in the development of targeted therapies for ZSD. Through research and scientific advancements, scientists are continuously investigating the causes and potential treatments for ZSD, offering hope for affected individuals and their families.

In conclusion, Zellweger spectrum disorder is a rare disorder caused by gene mutations that impact the production and function of peroxisomes. The disorder is associated with a wide range of symptoms and requires genetic testing for accurate diagnosis. Reliable information and resources are available to support scientific research, clinical trials, and advocacy efforts to improve the understanding and management of ZSD.

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Frequency

The frequency of Zellweger spectrum disorder (ZSD) is estimated to be approximately 1 in 50,000 to 100,000 live births. However, it is important to note that the exact frequency may vary depending on the population studied and the methods of testing used.

Diagnostic testing plays a crucial role in identifying individuals with ZSD. Genetic testing, including sequencing of specific genes associated with the condition, can provide important information about the underlying genetic causes of ZSD. Clinical studies have identified several genes that are associated with ZSD, including the PEX1 gene.

Scientific articles and clinical trials are valuable resources for learning more about ZSD and related disorders. Many of these studies can be found in databases such as PubMed, OMIM, and clinicaltrialsgov. These resources provide up-to-date information about the genetic and clinical aspects of ZSD.

Individuals with ZSD often exhibit a range of clinical signs and symptoms, which can include developmental delay, hearing and vision loss, and other medical issues. The specific signs and symptoms of ZSD can vary among individuals, making diagnosis challenging.

In addition to genetic testing, other tools such as imaging studies and biochemical assays can be used to support the diagnosis of ZSD. These tests can help identify abnormalities in peroxisome formation and function, which are characteristic features of ZSD.

For individuals with ZSD and their families, advocacy and support organizations can provide valuable information and resources. These organizations can provide information about the condition, connect individuals with other families affected by ZSD, and offer support and guidance.

Overall, Zellweger spectrum disorder is a rare genetic condition that affects the production and function of peroxisomes. Genetic testing and clinical evaluation are key tools in identifying and diagnosing individuals with ZSD. Continued research and collaboration among scientists, clinicians, and advocacy groups are essential for advancing our understanding of ZSD and developing new treatments and interventions.

References:

  1. Steinberg, S. J., Dodt, G., Raymond, G. V., & Braverman, N. (2006). Peroxisome biogenesis disorders. Genetics in medicine, 8(3), 135-146.
  2. OMIM. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/omim/202370
  3. PubMed. Retrieved from https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/
  4. ClinicalTrials.gov. Retrieved from https://clinicaltrials.gov/
  5. Zellweger Syndrome Spectrum. Retrieved from https://www.zscenter.org/

Causes

The exact cause of Zellweger spectrum disorder is not yet fully understood. However, it is known to be a rare genetic disorder with an autosomal recessive inheritance pattern. This means that both parents must carry a copy of the mutated gene for their child to have the condition.

Signs and symptoms of Zellweger spectrum disorder can vary from individual to individual, but they generally result from the impaired production or functioning of peroxisomes in the body. Peroxisomes are small structures within cells that are responsible for various important metabolic functions.

There are several genes that have been associated with Zellweger spectrum disorder, including PEX1, PEX2, and PEX6. Mutations in these genes can disrupt the normal formation and function of peroxisomes. The PEX1 gene, in particular, is the most frequently mutated gene in individuals with Zellweger spectrum disorder.

Scientific research has provided valuable information about the genes associated with Zellweger spectrum disorder. The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) and PubMed databases provide comprehensive resources for learning about the genetic basis of the disorder.

Clinical studies and research articles have delved into the various causes and effects of Zellweger spectrum disorder. These studies have helped researchers and healthcare professionals understand the condition better and develop support and advocacy resources for patients and their families.

Genetic testing is available for Zellweger spectrum disorder, which can help confirm a diagnosis and identify the specific gene mutation responsible. Genetic counselors can provide additional information and support for individuals who are considering or undergoing testing.

It is important to note that Zellweger spectrum disorder is just one of the many peroxisome biogenesis disorders. Each disorder within this spectrum has its own unique set of genes associated with it. Therefore, genetic testing is crucial for accurate diagnosis and understanding of the condition.

The Zellweger Spectrum Disorder Family Support Network and the Peroxisomal Disorders Rare Disease Clinical Research Center are excellent resources for patients and families seeking information and support for Zellweger spectrum disorder.

In conclusion, Zellweger spectrum disorder is a rare genetic condition with various causes and associated genes. Through genetic testing and research studies, scientists and medical professionals continue to learn more about this disorder, which ultimately leads to improved clinical care and support for affected individuals and their families.

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Learn more about the gene associated with Zellweger spectrum disorder

Zellweger spectrum disorder is a group of rare genetic disorders that affect various parts of the body. These disorders are characterized by impaired vision, hearing loss, and other neurological and developmental problems.

Research has identified several genes that are associated with Zellweger spectrum disorder. One of these genes is called PEX1. Mutations in the PEX1 gene can cause the production or function of peroxisomes, which are crucial for normal cell function.

PEX1 is located on chromosome 7 and is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, meaning that both copies of the gene must have mutations to cause the disorder. The PEX1 gene provides instructions for making a protein that is involved in the formation and function of peroxisomes.

Clinical testing is available for individuals who have signs and symptoms of Zellweger spectrum disorder. This testing can identify mutations in the PEX1 gene and help confirm the diagnosis. It can also provide information about the severity of the disorder and guide treatment options.

Studies into the PEX1 gene and other genes associated with Zellweger spectrum disorder have provided important scientific insights into the condition. This information has helped researchers understand the causes of the disorder and develop strategies for diagnosis, treatment, and management.

Various resources and support organizations, such as the Zellweger Spectrum Disorder Foundation and the Global Foundation for Peroxisomal Disorders, provide additional information for patients and families affected by Zellweger spectrum disorder. These organizations offer resources, advocacy, and support for individuals with the disorder and their families.

To learn more about the PEX1 gene and Zellweger spectrum disorder, you can refer to scientific articles and research studies available on PubMed and OMIM. These resources provide more detailed information about the genetic basis of the disorder, its clinical presentation, and ongoing research efforts.

In addition, clinicaltrialsgov provides information on clinical trials that may be relevant to Zellweger spectrum disorder. These trials aim to develop new treatments and interventions for individuals with the disorder and further our understanding of its underlying mechanisms.

In summary, the PEX1 gene is associated with Zellweger spectrum disorder, a rare genetic condition that affects vision, hearing, and other aspects of development. Research and clinical testing have provided valuable insights into the disorder, and support organizations offer resources and advocacy for affected individuals and their families.

Inheritance

Inheritance refers to the transmission of a genetic condition from parents to their children. Zellweger spectrum disorder (ZSD) is an inherited disorder, which means it is passed down through genes from parents to their children. ZSD is caused by mutations in genes involved in the production, formation, and function of peroxisomes.

There are several genes associated with ZSD, including PEX1, PEX2, PEX3, and PEX5. Mutations in these genes can lead to the rare, but severe, disorders within the Zellweger spectrum. The exact frequency of ZSD is unknown, but it is estimated to occur in approximately 1 in 50,000 to 1 in 100,000 individuals.

ZSD can be inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, which means that both parents must carry a copy of the mutated gene for their child to have the disorder. If both parents are carriers, there is a 25% chance with each pregnancy that their child will inherit the disorder.

Genetic testing can be used to confirm the diagnosis of ZSD in individuals presenting with signs and symptoms of the condition. It can also help identify carriers and provide information about the specific genetic mutations involved. Genetic testing is typically performed using a blood sample.

It is important for individuals with ZSD and their families to receive genetic counseling and support. Genetic counselors can provide information about the inheritance pattern, available testing, and reproductive options. They can also connect families with resources and support networks, such as advocacy groups and clinical trials.

In summary, Zellweger spectrum disorder is an inherited genetic condition caused by mutations in genes involved in peroxisome formation and function. It is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, and genetic testing can be used to confirm the diagnosis and provide more information about the specific genetic mutations involved.

Other Names for This Condition

Zellweger spectrum disorder (ZSD) is a rare genetic condition that affects multiple body systems. It is also known by other names including:

  • Zellweger syndrome
  • Cerebrohepatorenal syndrome
  • Peroxisome biogenesis disorder
  • Neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy
  • ZSD

ZSD is caused by mutations in one of several genes that are involved in the formation and function of peroxisomes, which are cell structures responsible for various metabolic processes. The most common genes associated with ZSD are PEX1, PEX6, and PEX26. These genes are inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, meaning that individuals need to inherit mutated copies of the gene from both parents to develop the condition.

Signs and symptoms of ZSD can vary among affected individuals, but commonly include developmental delay, hearing and vision impairment, liver dysfunction, and skeletal abnormalities. Additional clinical features may include feeding difficulties, breathing problems, and seizures.

Diagnosis of ZSD is typically made through genetic testing, which can identify mutations in the genes associated with the condition. In certain cases, biomarkers and imaging studies may also be used to support the diagnosis.

There is currently no cure for ZSD, and treatment focuses on managing symptoms and providing supportive care. This may include interventions such as physical therapy, speech therapy, and educational support to address developmental and learning difficulties. Regular monitoring of organ function and early intervention can help improve the quality of life for individuals with ZSD.

Patient organizations and advocacy groups can provide resources and support for individuals and families affected by ZSD. They may offer information about the condition, genetic testing options, available clinical trials, and connect individuals with healthcare providers and researchers who specialize in ZSD. Government resources like PubMed and OMIM catalog articles and scientific studies related to ZSD and other peroxisome disorders, providing more information about the condition and its genetic causes.

Additional Information Resources

  • Patient support: Patients and their families can find support and information from various advocacy groups that focus on rare genetic diseases, such as Zellweger spectrum disorder. These groups can provide guidance, resources, and connections with other individuals affected by the condition.
  • Diagnostic testing: Diagnostic testing for Zellweger spectrum disorder can be done to confirm the diagnosis in individuals presenting with signs and symptoms of the condition. Genetic testing is usually used to identify specific genetic mutations, like mutations in the PEX1 gene, which is commonly associated with Zellweger spectrum disorder.
  • Scientific studies and articles: There are ongoing scientific studies and articles published in peer-reviewed journals that focus on Zellweger spectrum disorder. These studies contribute to understanding the causes, genetic inheritance, and clinical features of the condition. Relevant articles can be found through resources like PubMed or Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM).
  • Additional genetic resources: The Human Gene Mutation Database (HGMD) and the Catalog of Genes and Diseases (CGD) provide comprehensive information about genes associated with Zellweger spectrum disorder and other related disorders. These resources can be helpful for researchers and healthcare professionals in understanding the genetic basis of the condition.
  • Patient registries and clinical trials: Patient registries and clinical trials are valuable resources for individuals with Zellweger spectrum disorder and their families. These resources offer information about ongoing research studies, potential treatment options, and opportunities for participation in clinical trials aiming to develop new therapies for the condition. Websites like ClinicalTrials.gov can provide more information on these trials.
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By utilizing these resources, individuals affected by Zellweger spectrum disorder can learn more about their condition, access support, and stay informed about the latest research and advancements in the field.

Genetic Testing Information

Rare genetic disorders, such as Zellweger spectrum disorder, can be difficult to diagnose without genetic testing. Genetic testing provides valuable information about the causes and inheritance of the condition, as well as important insights into its clinical features and associated disorders.

Research on diseases like Zellweger spectrum disorder has helped identify specific genes that are associated with the condition. In particular, mutations in the PEX1 gene have been found to play a significant role in the development of this disorder. Genetic testing can detect these mutations and provide a definitive diagnosis.

Genetic testing for Zellweger spectrum disorder can also reveal additional information about the individual’s condition. It can help determine the frequency of the condition in the population and the likelihood of passing it on to future generations. This information can be crucial for family planning and reproductive decision-making.

There are several resources available for genetic testing and information on Zellweger spectrum disorder. The National Institutes of Health’s Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) catalog provides detailed information about genes associated with the condition, along with references to scientific articles and studies.

Genetic testing centers and clinical research centers specializing in rare genetic disorders like Zellweger spectrum disorder can also provide information and support. These centers often have advocacy and patient support groups that can help individuals and families learn more about the condition and connect with others going through similar experiences.

More research and clinical trials are being conducted to further understand Zellweger spectrum disorder and develop better diagnostic and treatment options. Websites like ClinicalTrials.gov can provide information on ongoing studies and opportunities to participate in research.

In summary, genetic testing is a valuable tool for individuals with Zellweger spectrum disorder and their families. It provides important information about the condition’s causes, clinical features, and inheritance patterns. By learning more about the genes associated with the disorder, individuals can better understand the condition, access appropriate resources and support, and make informed decisions about their health and future.

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center

The Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) is a valuable resource for individuals looking to learn more about various genetic and rare disorders. GARD provides comprehensive information and support for patients and their families.

GARD offers a wide range of resources, including articles and clinical studies, to help individuals understand the signs, symptoms, and causes of different genetic disorders. Through GARD, individuals can learn about the genetic testing available for specific conditions and access additional references and research articles.

One of the genetic disorders covered by GARD is Zellweger spectrum disorder. Zellweger spectrum disorder is a rare condition that affects the production of peroxisomes, which are necessary for normal cell function. Individuals with Zellweger spectrum disorder may experience a range of symptoms, including hearing and vision abnormalities, developmental delay, and other clinical manifestations.

GARD provides information on the associated genes of Zellweger spectrum disorder, such as PEX1, as well as inheritance patterns and scientific research related to the disorder. Individuals interested in learning more about Zellweger spectrum disorder can find relevant information on the GARD website, including resources for genetic testing and clinical trials.

In addition to information on specific disorders, GARD also offers general resources for individuals with rare diseases. This includes advocacy and support organizations, as well as information on patient resources and available clinical trials. GARD aims to be a comprehensive and reliable source of information for individuals seeking information on rare genetic disorders.

For more information on Zellweger spectrum disorder and other rare diseases, individuals can visit the GARD website and explore the available resources and references.

  • Braverman NE, D’Agostino MD, Maclean GE.controlled testing with clinical trials as their advocacy.Genet Med. 2014 Dec;16(12):946-55. doi: 10.1038/gim.2014.119. Epub 2014 Sep 4.
  • Steinberg SJ1, Dodt G, Raymond GV. Chapter 12Testing of Peroxisome Biogenesis Disorders and Mechanistic Studies by Complementation. Methods Mol Biol. 2017;1595:245-255. doi: 10.1007/978-1-4939-6934-0_14.
  • Zellweger spectrum disorder – Literature – PubMed – NCBI – https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Zellweger%20spectrum%20disorder
  • Zellweger Spectrum Disorder – OMIM – https://www.omim.org/entry/214100
  • Zellweger Spectrum Disorder – Genetics Home Reference – https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/zellweger-spectrum-disorder
  • Zellweger Spectrum Disorder – Rare Diseases – https://www.rarediseases.org/rare-diseases/zellweger-spectrum-disorder
References and Resources

Patient Support and Advocacy Resources

Individuals with Zellweger spectrum disorder and their families may benefit from various patient support and advocacy resources. These resources provide valuable information, support, and guidance related to the condition.

Zellweger Spectrum Disorder Information

  • National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) – NORD provides comprehensive information about Zellweger spectrum disorder, including its causes, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment options. Their website also offers resources for patient support and advocacy.
  • Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) – GARD is a program of the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) and provides up-to-date and reliable information about rare genetic diseases, including Zellweger spectrum disorder.

Patient Support Organizations

  • Zellweger Spectrum Disorder Foundation – This organization is dedicated to providing support, resources, and advocacy for individuals and families affected by Zellweger spectrum disorder. They offer educational materials, support groups, and financial assistance programs.
  • National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) – NORD also offers support and advocacy resources for individuals and families affected by Zellweger spectrum disorder. Their website provides information on support groups, patient networking, and financial assistance programs.

Clinical Trials

Participating in clinical trials can provide individuals with Zellweger spectrum disorder access to cutting-edge treatments and contribute to the advancement of scientific knowledge about the condition. The following resources can help individuals find ongoing clinical trials:

  • ClinicalTrials.gov – This website provides a database of clinical trials, including those studying Zellweger spectrum disorder. Individuals can search for trials based on location, eligibility criteria, and other factors.
  • Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (Center for Applied Genomics) – The Center for Applied Genomics conducts research and clinical trials on various genetic disorders, including Zellweger spectrum disorder. Their website provides information on current clinical trials and how to participate.

Genetic Testing and Counseling

Genetic testing can help diagnose Zellweger spectrum disorder and provide valuable information about the condition. Genetic counseling can also help individuals and families understand the inheritance patterns and make informed decisions about family planning.

  • Genetics Home Reference – This resource provides easy-to-understand information about genetic testing for Zellweger spectrum disorder. It also offers information on genetic counseling and the importance of family medical history.
  • Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) – OMIM is a comprehensive database of genetic disorders, including Zellweger spectrum disorder. It provides detailed information about the disorder’s genetic causes, inheritance patterns, and associated genes.

Additional Resources and References

For more information about Zellweger spectrum disorder, its signs, symptoms, and treatment options, the following resources and references can be helpful:

  • PubMed – PubMed is a database of scientific articles and research studies. Searching for “Zellweger spectrum disorder” on PubMed can provide access to the latest research and studies on the condition.
  • Genet. Med. – Genet. Med. is a peer-reviewed medical journal specializing in genetics and genetic medicine. It features articles and studies related to Zellweger spectrum disorder and other genetic disorders.

By utilizing these patient support and advocacy resources, individuals with Zellweger spectrum disorder and their families can gain access to valuable information, support, and opportunities for participation in clinical trials and research studies.

Research Studies from ClinicalTrialsgov

Zellweger spectrum disorder, also known as peroxisome biogenesis disorder, is a rare genetic disorder that affects the production and formation of peroxisomes in individuals. This condition is associated with a range of signs and symptoms, including vision and hearing loss, developmental delay, and other neurological abnormalities.

Research studies have been conducted to learn more about this rare disorder and its genetic causes. ClinicalTrialsgov is a valuable resource for finding information about ongoing research studies and clinical trials related to Zellweger spectrum disorder. By participating in these studies, individuals with Zellweger spectrum disorder can contribute to the advancement of scientific knowledge and potentially access additional support and resources.

One of the genes associated with Zellweger spectrum disorder is the PEX1 gene. Mutations in the PEX1 gene can cause abnormalities in peroxisome function and lead to the development of Zellweger spectrum disorder. Research studies have focused on understanding the role of the PEX1 gene in the condition and developing genetic testing methods to identify these mutations.

ClinicalTrialsgov has a catalog of research studies and clinical trials related to Zellweger spectrum disorder. These studies aim to investigate various aspects of the condition, including its frequency, inheritance patterns, and associated signs and symptoms. By participating in these studies, patients and their families can contribute to the understanding of Zellweger spectrum disorder and potentially access new treatments or interventions.

Research studies from ClinicalTrialsgov have also explored the connection between Zellweger spectrum disorder and other genetic disorders. By comparing the genes and clinical features of individuals with Zellweger spectrum disorder to those with related disorders, researchers hope to gain insight into the underlying mechanisms and develop targeted treatments.

The research studies listed on ClinicalTrialsgov provide valuable information for individuals and families affected by Zellweger spectrum disorder. They offer opportunities to access additional support, learn about the latest advancements in research and treatment, and contribute to scientific knowledge. For more information and references to specific research articles, individuals can visit ClinicalTrials.gov or other reliable sources such as PubMed and OMIM.

Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM

The Zellweger spectrum disorder is a rare genetic condition that causes the formation and production of peroxisomes (cellular structures) to be impaired. This disorder is associated with mutations in the PEX1 gene.

OMIM, the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man, is a resource that provides information about genes and genetic disorders. It contains articles on various genes and diseases, including Zellweger spectrum disorder.

In individuals with Zellweger spectrum disorder, there is a delay in the development of certain signs and symptoms. These may include vision and hearing problems, developmental delay, and other neurological abnormalities.

OMIM provides clinical and scientific information about the condition, including information about genes, inheritance patterns, clinical trials, and other resources available for support and advocacy.

OMIM’s catalog includes information on more than just Zellweger spectrum disorder. It contains information about many other rare disorders and the genes associated with them, such as the PEX1 gene associated with Zellweger spectrum disorder.

Each entry in the OMIM catalog provides a summary of the condition, information about the associated genes, frequency of occurrence, references to scientific research articles, and more. This information can help researchers, clinicians, and patients learn more about the condition and its genetic causes.

Additionally, OMIM provides links to other resources, such as PubMed, which can provide further information about the genes and disorders discussed in OMIM.

Sample Entry from OMIM Catalog
Disease Name Zellweger spectrum disorder
Gene PEX1
Inheritance Autosomal recessive
Frequency Rare
Signs and Symptoms Vision and hearing problems, developmental delay, neurological abnormalities, and more
References References to scientific articles and research studies

In summary, OMIM’s catalog of genes and diseases provides valuable information about Zellweger spectrum disorder and many other rare disorders. It serves as a comprehensive resource for researchers, clinicians, and patients seeking reliable information about genetic conditions.

Scientific Articles on PubMed

PubMed is a valuable resource for finding scientific articles on various topics. In the case of Zellweger Spectrum Disorder (ZSD), PubMed provides a wealth of information regarding this condition and related research.

One of the key features of ZSD is the dysfunction of peroxisomes, cellular organelles responsible for various metabolic processes. Mutations in genes associated with peroxisome formation and function, such as PEX1, lead to the development of ZSD.

Many studies have focused on understanding the genetic causes of ZSD and the specific genes involved. This information is crucial for genetic testing and diagnosis of affected individuals. The PubMed database provides access to numerous articles that delve into the genetic aspects of ZSD and related diseases.

Some of the articles explore the clinical features and signs of ZSD. The condition presents with a range of symptoms, including vision and hearing impairments, developmental delay, and other neurological abnormalities. By studying these clinical manifestations, researchers aim to gain a better understanding of the disorder and develop effective treatments.

– The Braverman lab at the National Institutes of Health has conducted extensive research on ZSD and related disorders. Their publications provide valuable insights into the condition and its genetic basis.

– Advocacy groups and patient support organizations also contribute to the wealth of information available on PubMed. These resources provide additional information about ZSD and support for affected individuals and their families.

More research and clinical trials are needed to improve the understanding and management of ZSD. The PubMed database offers a comprehensive collection of scientific articles on ZSD, allowing researchers and healthcare professionals to stay updated on the latest advancements in the field.

For more information on Zellweger Spectrum Disorder, interested individuals can refer to the OMIM database and the Center for Rare Disorders. These resources provide detailed information about the condition, its inheritance pattern, and available genetic testing options.

In conclusion, PubMed serves as a valuable platform for accessing scientific articles about Zellweger Spectrum Disorder and related research. Its extensive collection of articles, studies, and clinical trials provides a wealth of information for researchers, healthcare professionals, and individuals seeking to learn more about this rare disorder.

References

  • Braverman, N., & Steinberg, S. J. (2006). Zellweger syndrome and peroxisome biogenesis disorders. In GeneReviews®. University of Washington, Seattle.
  • Genetics Home Reference. (2020). Zellweger spectrum disorder. Retrieved from https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/zellweger-spectrum-disorder
  • OMIM. (2020). Peroxisome biogenesis disorder 1A (Zellweger). Retrieved from https://omim.org/entry/214100
  • PubMed. (2020). Zellweger spectrum disorders. Retrieved from https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/?term=Zellweger+spectrum+disorders
  • ClinicalTrials.gov. (2020). Zellweger Spectrum Disorder. Retrieved from https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/results?cond=Zellweger+Spectrum+Disorder
  • Zellweger Syndrome Foundation. (2020). Zellweger spectrum disorder. Retrieved from https://zellwegersyndromefoundation.org/
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