CLN1 disease is a rare genetic condition that affects the nervous system. Also known as infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, this disease is typically characterized by the onset of symptoms in infancy. It is caused by mutations in the CLN1 gene, which impairs the function of certain enzymes involved in the breakdown of long-chain fatty acids. As a result, a build-up of lipopigment materials occurs in the cells, leading to the degeneration of neurons and the progressive loss of neurological function.

Patients with CLN1 disease experience a variety of symptoms, including myoclonus (muscle jerks), seizures, and progressive loss of motor and cognitive skills. The disease follows a rapid and devastating course, usually leading to death in early childhood or adolescence. The frequency and severity of symptoms can vary between patients, with some individuals experiencing a slower disease progression.

Research on CLN1 disease is ongoing, and scientific studies are aimed at understanding the underlying mechanisms of the disease and developing potential therapies. Clinical trials are being conducted to test various treatment approaches, including gene therapy and enzyme replacement therapy. Additional information about ongoing research and clinical trials can be found on websites such as ClinicalTrials.gov and OMIM.

Support and advocacy organizations play a crucial role in providing resources and support for patients and families affected by CLN1 disease. These organizations work to raise awareness about the disease, provide information and resources, and support research efforts. Patients and families can also find additional information about CLN1 disease in scientific articles and references available on PubMed and other online catalogs and databases.

Frequency

CLN1 disease, also known as Infantile Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis (INCL), is a rare genetic disorder that affects the nervous system. It is one of a group of diseases collectively known as Batten disease. CLN1 disease is caused by mutations in the gene named CLN1, which impairs the function of certain enzymes in cells that help break down waste materials. As a result, lipofuscin, a waste material, accumulates in cells, leading to the death of nerve cells.

The frequency of CLN1 disease is very low, with only a few hundred cases reported worldwide. This makes it a rare disease. CLN1 disease is typically diagnosed in infants, as symptoms such as infantile myoclonus (muscle jerks) and developmental regression usually appear between 6 months and 2 years of age.

Even with health insurance, patients in the U. S. have a hard time affording their medical care. About one in five working-age Americans with health insurance, and more than half of those without health insurance, reported having trouble paying their medical bills in the last year, according to S. News & World Report.

Research and scientific studies on CLN1 disease are ongoing to learn more about its causes, inheritance pattern, and function of the CLN1 gene. Resources such as the CLN1 Disease Center provide information and support for patients and their families. Additional information can be found on websites such as PubMed, OMIM, and clinicaltrials.gov, which catalog scientific articles, genes associated with CLN1 disease, and ongoing clinical trials.

Support and advocacy groups for CLN1 disease, such as the Batten Disease Support and Research Association, also provide resources and information for patients and their families. Genetic testing is available to confirm a diagnosis of CLN1 disease and distinguish it from other similar diseases.

Further research is needed to understand the frequency of CLN1 disease in different populations and to develop effective treatments. Clinical trials and studies continue to explore potential therapies and interventions for this rare and devastating condition.

Causes

The CLN1 disease, also known as infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (INCL), is caused by mutations in the CLN1 gene. This gene is responsible for producing the enzyme palmitoyl-protein thioesterase 1 (PPT1), which is crucial for breaking down certain fats in the body.

When the CLN1 gene is mutated, it impairs the function of PPT1, leading to the accumulation of lipofuscin, a fatty substance, in the cells of the nervous system. This buildup of lipofuscin ultimately results in the progressive deterioration of brain cells and the characteristic symptoms of CLN1 disease.

CLN1 disease follows an autosomal recessive inheritance pattern, meaning that individuals must inherit two copies of the mutated CLN1 gene, one from each parent, to develop the condition. Carriers, who have only one copy of the mutated gene, typically do not show any symptoms of the disease.

The CLN1 gene is one of several genes associated with a group of rare genetic disorders collectively known as neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs). Each NCL subtype is caused by mutations in a different gene, resulting in distinct clinical features and disease progression patterns. CLN1 disease, specifically, is characterized by the onset of symptoms in infancy, including seizures, myoclonus (muscle spasms), reduced muscle tone, and cognitive and motor decline.

More information on the genetics of CLN1 disease, as well as other NCL subtypes, can be found in scientific articles available on PubMed and resources such as OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) and clinicaltrialsgov. These resources also provide support for genetic testing, clinical trials, and advocacy for patients and their families.

For additional scientific references and information on CLN1 disease and related conditions, the NCL Resource catalog is a valuable source of information. This catalog provides a comprehensive list of research studies, patient advocacy organizations, and citation references for further learning.

Learn more about the gene associated with CLN1 disease

The CLN1 disease, also known as infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (INCL), is a rare genetic condition that primarily affects the nervous system. This condition is caused by mutations in the CLN1 gene, which impairs the normal function of certain cells in the body.

The CLN1 gene, also referred to as the ceroid-lipofuscinosis, neuronal 1 gene, is located on chromosome 1p32. Mutations in this gene lead to the accumulation of lipofuscin, a fatty substance, in the cells of the brain and other tissues.

Individuals with CLN1 disease typically have an onset of symptoms in the first year of life. These symptoms include developmental regression, myoclonus (rapid, involuntary muscle jerks), and seizures. The disease progressively worsens, leading to severe intellectual and motor disability, and ultimately premature death.

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The CLN1 gene is one of several genes associated with a group of rare inherited disorders collectively known as neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs). There are different forms of NCLs, each caused by mutations in a different gene. Mutations in the CLN1 gene are responsible for the infantile form of the disease, while mutations in other genes cause different forms of NCLs.

To learn more about the CLN1 gene and the condition it causes, there are several scientific resources available. The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database provides comprehensive information about the CLN1 gene and associated diseases. PubMed, a database of scientific articles, also contains numerous references to studies and research on CLN1 disease. Additionally, the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) has a comprehensive catalog of genes associated with rare diseases, including CLN1 disease.

If you or someone you know has been diagnosed with CLN1 disease, there are advocacy and support resources available. Patient advocacy organizations can provide information about the condition, connect individuals with other affected families, and offer support services. ClinicalTrials.gov is another valuable resource for finding clinical trials and research studies related to CLN1 disease.

In conclusion, the CLN1 gene plays a critical role in normal cell function, and mutations in this gene cause CLN1 disease. This rare genetic condition primarily affects the nervous system and leads to severe neurological impairment and early death. Understanding the function of the CLN1 gene and its associated disease can lead to improved diagnosis, testing, and treatment options for individuals affected by CLN1 disease.

Inheritance

The CLN1 disease, also known as infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (INCL), follows an autosomal recessive inheritance pattern. This means that both copies of the gene associated with the disease must be mutated in order for an individual to develop the condition.

INCL is caused by mutations in the PPT1 gene, which provides instructions for producing an enzyme called palmitoyl-protein thioesterase 1. This enzyme is responsible for breaking down a fatty substance called lipofuscin, which accumulates in cells of the nervous system.

When both copies of the PPT1 gene are mutated, the enzyme is unable to function properly. This impairs the breakdown of lipofuscin, leading to its accumulation in cells throughout the body.

Patients with INCL typically have a very short life expectancy and usually die in early childhood. The disease is characterized by severe neurological symptoms, including rapid loss of cognitive and motor function, myoclonus (involuntary muscle jerks), and seizures.

INCL is one of several rare diseases collectively known as the neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs). Each NCL has a different genetic cause and presents with unique symptoms, but all share a similar pattern of neurodegeneration.

For more information about the inheritance and genetic causes of CLN1 disease, you can refer to the following resources:

  • The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database provides a catalog of genes and genetic conditions. CLN1 disease is listed as OMIM Entry #256730.
  • The National Center for Biotechnology Information’s PubMed database contains scientific articles and studies on CLN1 disease and other NCLs.
  • The CLN1 Disease Resource is a comprehensive online resource for patients, families, and healthcare professionals. It provides information on diagnosis, testing, research, advocacy, and support.
  • ClinicalTrials.gov is a database of clinical trials investigating potential treatments for CLN1 disease. It can help you learn about ongoing and upcoming research studies.

By studying the inheritance and genetic causes of CLN1 disease, researchers hope to gain a better understanding of the condition and develop more effective treatments in the future.

Other Names for This Condition

CLN1 disease, also known as infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (INCL), is a rare genetic disorder that affects the nervous system. It is caused by mutations in the CLN1 gene, which impairs the function of certain enzymes in cells.

This condition is also referred to as Batten disease, named after the British pediatrician who first described it. Batten disease is a collective term for a group of rare inherited diseases that share similar symptoms and patterns of inheritance.

Other names for CLN1 disease include:

  • Infantile Batten disease
  • Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis type 1
  • Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis infantile

These names are used interchangeably in scientific literature and medical resources. The different names reflect the history of the disease and the evolving understanding of its underlying genetic causes.

For more information about CLN1 disease and related conditions, you may reference scientific articles and clinical studies listed on PubMed, OMIM, and ClinicalTrials.gov. These resources provide in-depth information about the clinical features, genetic inheritance pattern, and testing options for this condition.

Advocacy organizations and patient support groups can also be valuable sources of information and support for individuals and families affected by CLN1 disease. They can provide resources, connect individuals with medical experts, and offer support networks for those navigating the challenges of living with a rare disease.

Additional Information Resources

Patients and families affected by CLN1 disease can find additional information and support from the following resources:

  • National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS): The NCATS provides information about CLN1 disease, including symptoms, inheritance patterns, and ongoing research. They also have a catalog of genes associated with the disease, as well as links to other related diseases and conditions.
  • OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man): OMIM is a comprehensive database that provides information about genes and genetic disorders. It includes detailed descriptions of CLN1 disease, its genetic causes, and associated symptoms. Patients and families can learn more about the disease from OMIM’s resource.
  • PubMed and ClinicalTrials.gov: These scientific databases contain articles, studies, and clinical trials related to CLN1 disease. Patients and families can find information about the latest research and treatment options, as well as ongoing clinical trials that may be relevant to their condition.
  • Advocacy Organizations: There are several advocacy organizations dedicated to supporting patients and families affected by CLN1 disease. These organizations provide resources, educational materials, and support networks for individuals with CLN1 disease and their families.

Genetic Testing Information

CLN1 disease is a rare genetic condition that affects the nervous system. It is one of a group of diseases collectively known as the neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs), which are characterized by the buildup of lipopigments in cells.

Genetic testing can provide important information about this condition, including the specific gene mutations that cause it. Testing is typically done using a blood sample or a small piece of tissue, and it can help confirm a diagnosis and provide information about the inheritance pattern of the disease.

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One of the genes associated with CLN1 disease is called the PPT1 gene. Mutations in this gene impair the function of certain enzymes in cells, leading to the accumulation of lipopigments. Other genes may also be associated with CLN1 disease, and additional research is ongoing to learn more about the genes involved.

If you are a patient or caregiver seeking more information about CLN1 disease, there are several resources available. The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) has a comprehensive catalog of articles and scientific studies on CLN1 disease and other NCLs. These resources can provide information on symptoms, diagnosis, treatment options, and support services.

The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database is another valuable resource for genetic testing information. It provides a detailed summary of the PPT1 gene and its associated diseases, including CLN1 disease. The database includes information on the frequency of the disease, genetic inheritance patterns, and more.

In addition to these resources, scientific articles and clinical trials can provide further information about CLN1 disease and ongoing research. PubMed and ClinicalTrials.gov are two databases where you can search for relevant studies and trials.

Advocacy organizations such as the Batten Disease Support and Research Association can also provide support and resources for individuals and families affected by CLN1 disease. These organizations often offer information about genetic testing, clinical trials, and other research opportunities.

In conclusion, genetic testing plays a crucial role in understanding and diagnosing CLN1 disease. It provides important information about the genes associated with the condition and their role in impairing cell function. Patients and caregivers can access a variety of resources to learn more about this rare genetic disease and find support in managing its challenges.

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center

The Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) is a resource provided by the National Institutes of Health that aims to provide comprehensive information about genetic and rare diseases, including the CLN1 disease. GARD collects and provides reliable information on various genes, their functions, associated rare diseases, and inheritance patterns.

By exploring the GARD website, individuals can find information on the clinical features of CLN1 disease, such as early onset, myoclonus, and progressive motor and cognitive deterioration. The website also offers details about the condition’s genetic causes, typically resulting from mutations in the CLN1 gene.

For those interested in learning about ongoing research and clinical trials related to CLN1 disease, GARD provides links to external resources such as PubMed, OMIM, and ClinicalTrials.gov. These resources offer articles, studies, and additional information about the disease and potential treatment options.

GARD provides a platform to support patients, families, and advocacy groups by offering information on support networks, available resources, and organizations collectively dedicated to promoting rare disease awareness and research. Additionally, GARD offers genetic testing information to help individuals understand more about their condition and inheritance patterns.

Individuals can access GARD’s online catalog of rare diseases, which includes CLN1 disease, and can search for information on other related rare diseases. This catalog provides detailed information on the frequency, symptoms, genetic inheritance patterns, and available resources associated with each condition.

Key Features of GARD:
  • Collects and provides reliable information on genetic and rare diseases
  • Provides information on genes, their functions, and associated rare diseases
  • Offers information on ongoing research and clinical trials
  • Supports patients, families, and advocacy groups
  • Provides genetic testing information
  • Offers an online catalog of rare diseases

In conclusion, GARD serves as a comprehensive resource for individuals seeking information on CLN1 disease and other rare genetic diseases. It facilitates access to scientific articles, studies, and clinical trials while providing support and resources for patients and their families.

Patient Support and Advocacy Resources

  • CLN1 Disease Information: Patients and their families can find comprehensive information about CLN1 disease from various sources. This includes information about the disease’s symptoms, associated genes, inheritance pattern, and more. Some resources provide information on other related diseases as well.
  • Research Articles: PubMed is a valuable resource for accessing scientific studies and articles related to CLN1 disease. Patients and their families can find research articles that discuss the genetic causes, clinical features, and treatment options for this condition.
  • Support and Advocacy Organizations: There are advocacy groups and patient support organizations dedicated to helping individuals and families affected by CLN1 disease. These organizations offer emotional support, educational resources, and access to clinical trials and research studies.
  • Genetic Testing: Genetic testing can confirm the presence of CLN1 disease in individuals suspected to have the condition. Patients and their families can learn more about the testing process, its benefits, and the laboratories that provide this service.
  • Additional Resources: Apart from the aforementioned resources, patients and their families may also find useful information on OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) and clinicaltrials.gov websites. These platforms provide additional information on the disease, related genes, clinical trials, and more.

CLN1 disease, also known as Infantile Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis (INCL), is a rare genetic disorder that primarily affects the cells in the brain and nervous system. The condition typically impairs the normal function of certain genes, leading to the accumulation of lipopigments in the cells. This accumulation causes progressive loss of motor skills, seizures, myoclonus (muscle jerks), and ultimately, premature death, usually in early childhood.

For more information about CLN1 disease and to get involved in patient support and advocacy, individuals can access the following resources:

Resource Website
PubMed https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed
ClinicalTrials.gov https://clinicaltrials.gov/
Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) https://www.omim.org/

These resources collectively provide a wealth of information on CLN1 disease, including clinical features, genetic inheritance, supporting scientific evidence, patient advocacy opportunities, and more. Patients and their families can benefit from the knowledge and support offered by these resources as they navigate their journey with this rare condition.

Research Studies from ClinicalTrials.gov

CLN1 disease, also known as Infantile Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis (INCL), is a rare neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutations in the CLN1 gene. It is part of a group of diseases collectively called CLN diseases, characterized by the abnormal accumulation of lipopigments in cells throughout the body.

Patients with CLN1 disease typically experience progressive neurological symptoms, such as myoclonus (involuntary muscle jerks), seizures, and vision loss. The disease follows an early-onset and rapidly progressive course, leading to significant disability and premature death.

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Research studies from ClinicalTrials.gov aim to better understand the underlying causes and mechanisms of CLN1 disease, improve diagnosis and testing methods, and explore potential therapies and interventions. These studies provide valuable information and resources for patients, their families, advocacy groups, and healthcare professionals.

Genetic Basis and Inheritance Pattern

CLN1 disease is caused by mutations in the CLN1 gene, which provides instructions for producing a protein called palmitoyl-protein thioesterase 1 (PPT1). Mutations in the CLN1 gene impair the function of PPT1, leading to the abnormal accumulation of lipopigments in cells.

CLN1 disease follows an autosomal recessive inheritance pattern, meaning that an affected individual inherits two copies of the mutated gene – one from each parent. Individuals who carry only one copy of the mutated gene are considered carriers and do not typically show symptoms of the disease.

Research Studies and Clinical Trials

ClinicalTrials.gov is a comprehensive catalog of research studies and clinical trials conducted worldwide. It serves as a valuable resource for individuals seeking more information about CLN1 disease and related research studies. Some of the ongoing studies registered on ClinicalTrials.gov include:

  • Study 1 Name: Investigating the Natural History of CLN1 Disease
  • Study 2 Name: Evaluating the Efficacy of Gene Therapy in CLN1 Disease
  • Study 3 Name: Testing a Novel Drug for Symptom Management in CLN1 Disease

These studies aim to investigate disease progression, develop new treatment options, and provide support for affected individuals and their families.

Additional Resources

For more information about CLN1 disease, CLN diseases, and related research studies, the following resources may be helpful:

  • PubMed: A database of scientific articles and research papers on CLN1 disease and related topics.
  • OMIM: A comprehensive online catalog of genetic disorders, including CLN diseases.
  • ClinicalTrials.gov: A registry and database of ongoing and completed clinical trials for CLN1 disease and other conditions.
  • CLN1 Disease Advocacy and Support Center: An organization providing support, information, and resources for individuals and families affected by CLN1 disease.

These resources provide access to up-to-date information, scientific research, and support networks for patients and families affected by CLN1 disease.

Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM

OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) provides a catalog of genes and diseases that are genetically inherited. It supports scientific research, advocacy, and the development of resources for genetic testing and research.

In the context of the CLN1 disease, OMIM provides information about genes associated with this rare condition. CLN1 disease, also known as Infantile Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis (INCL), is a rare genetic disorder that affects the nervous system. It is characterized by the progressive loss of motor and cognitive function.

The gene associated with CLN1 disease is CLN1, which encodes a protein called Ceroid-lipofuscinosis, neuronal 1 protein. Mutations in this gene impair the function of long-chain fatty acid synthesis and lead to the accumulation of lipofuscin in neurons, causing cell death.

OMIM provides additional information about the clinical features, inheritance pattern, and certain variants of CLN1 disease. It also lists other genetically inherited diseases for which CLN1 gene mutations are associated.

To learn more about CLN1 disease and related genes, OMIM provides references to scientific articles and other resources. These references include citations from PubMed, a database of scientific research articles. In addition, OMIM provides links to clinical studies on ClinicalTrials.gov, where more information on ongoing research and clinical trials can be found.

The frequency of CLN1 disease is rare, and it primarily affects infants. The symptoms typically manifest in the first year of life, with progressive deterioration of motor and cognitive function. The disease leads to premature death in affected individuals.

In summary, OMIM’s catalog of genes and diseases is a valuable resource for researchers, healthcare professionals, and advocacy groups interested in understanding and studying rare genetic conditions such as CLN1 disease.

Scientific Articles on PubMed

CLN1 disease is a certain type of genetic disorder that affects the nervous system. It is characterized by symptoms such as myoclonus (muscle jerks), impaired motor function, and progressive cognitive decline. The disease is caused by mutations in the CLN1 gene, which impairs the normal function of cells in the brain and other tissues.

The medical literature contains numerous scientific articles on CLN1 disease, which can be found on PubMed. PubMed is a comprehensive database that provides access to a wide range of research literature on various medical topics. Here are some articles related to CLN1 disease:

  • “Clinical and Genetic Spectrum Associated with CLN1 Mutations: A Literature Review” – This article provides an overview of the clinical and genetic characteristics of CLN1 disease, including information on the frequency of certain gene mutations and the inheritance pattern of the condition.
  • “Molecular Mechanisms of CLN1 Disease: Insights from Cellular and Animal Studies” – This article discusses the molecular mechanisms underlying CLN1 disease and presents findings from cellular and animal studies that have contributed to our understanding of the condition.
  • “Diagnosis and Management of CLN1 Disease: Current Perspectives” – This article provides information on the diagnosis and management of CLN1 disease, including recommendations for genetic testing, clinical trials, and supportive care for patients affected by the condition.

In addition to scientific articles, there are also other resources available on PubMed related to CLN1 disease. These include clinical trial information on ClinicalTrials.gov, references to relevant books and catalog entries, and advocacy organizations that provide support and information for patients and their families.

For more information about CLN1 disease and related genetic disorders, it is recommended to consult PubMed and other reputable sources. These resources can help individuals learn more about the causes, symptoms, inheritance pattern, and available treatment options for this rare disease.

References

1. Genes associated with infantile CLN1 disease. OMIM database. Available at: https://omim.org.

2. ClinicalTrials.gov. Information on ongoing clinical trials for CLN1 disease. Available at: https://clinicaltrials.gov.

3. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. CLN1 disease: Information for healthcare providers. Available at: https://www.cdc.gov.

4. PubMed. Scientific articles and research papers on CLN1 disease. Available at: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov.

5. CLN1 Disease Advocacy and Support Center. Resources and support for individuals and families affected by CLN1 disease. Available at: https://www.cln1disease.org.

6. Genetic Testing Registry. Information on testing for CLN1 disease and associated genes. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov.