The CRLF1 gene, also known as the cytokine receptor-like factor 1 gene, is a complex genetic receptor-like gene. It plays a crucial role in the regulation of body temperature, sweating, and other related conditions. Various scientific articles and databases provide information on the genetic changes and health problems associated with this gene. One such database is the OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) database, which lists the CRLF1 gene as a contributor to the cold-induced sweating syndrome.

The CRLF1 gene is responsible for encoding the cytokine-like factor 1 protein, which is involved in the neurol regulation of nerve tissues and the sympathetic nervous system. This protein plays a significant role in body temperature regulation and sweating responses. Scientific studies have identified various changes in the CRLF1 gene that are associated with cold-induced sweating syndrome and other related conditions.

The CRLF1 gene has also been linked to other health problems and disorders. In addition to cold-induced sweating syndrome, genetic changes in the CRLF1 gene have been associated with facial nerve palsy, little catalog-related features, and additional complex genetic abnormalities. Further testing and research are necessary to fully understand the impact of these genetic changes on overall health and functioning.

The CRLF1 gene is a subject of ongoing scientific research and investigation. It is important for scientists and healthcare professionals to stay up-to-date with the latest research and resources related to this gene. The OMIM database and PubMed are valuable resources for accessing scientific articles, references, testing information, and additional features related to the CRLF1 gene and its associated health conditions.

The CRLF1 gene, also known as the cytokine receptor-like factor 1 gene, is associated with a number of health conditions. Changes or variants in this gene can lead to different disorders and syndromes. Here are some of the diseases and conditions related to genetic changes in the CRLF1 gene:

  • Cold-Induced Sweating Syndrome (CISS)
    • This condition is characterized by excessive sweating, especially in response to cold temperatures. People with CISS may experience sweating on the face, body, or other areas.
  • Crisponi Syndrome
    • Crisponi syndrome is a rare disorder that affects the nervous system and causes problems with body temperature regulation. Symptoms include high fevers, excessive sweating, and facial features that appear tense or mask-like.
  • Neuroendocrine Degenerative Syndrome (NEDS)
    • Neuroendocrine degenerative syndrome is a disorder that affects the sympathetic nervous system, which controls many automatic bodily functions. NEDS can cause problems with body temperature, blood pressure, and sweating.

Testing for genetic changes in the CRLF1 gene can be done through genetic tests. These tests can provide important information for diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of these conditions. If you suspect you or someone you know may have a genetic change in the CRLF1 gene, it is recommended to consult with a healthcare professional or a genetic counselor.

Once you do get to see the doctor, don’t be surprised if you’re rushed out of the exam room before you get all of your questions answered, according to healthcare staffing agency Staff Care. Studies show that 41% of ophthalmologists spend just 9 to 12 minutes with a patient, and 13- to 16-minute appointments are the norm for 40% of cardiologists, 37% of pediatricians, 35% of urologists, 35% of family physicians, 34% of obstetricians and gynecologists and 30% of otolaryngologists.

Additional resources and information about these conditions, CRLF1 gene, and related genetic changes can be found in scientific articles, online databases, and registries. PubMed is a popular database for scientific articles and references in the field of genetics. The CRLF1 gene and related genetic changes can also be found in genetic databases and catalogs.

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Cold-induced sweating syndrome

Cold-induced sweating syndrome (CISS) is a rare genetic disorder caused by mutations in the CRLF1 gene. This gene provides instructions for making a protein called cytokine-like factor 1 (CLCF1), which is part of the receptor complex for the cytokine cardiotrophin-like cytokine factor 1 (CLCF1).

CISS is characterized by impaired sweating, particularly in response to cold temperatures. People with CISS may have a decreased ability to sweat on their face and body, even when their body temperature rises. This can lead to overheating and other health problems.

The CRLF1 gene is also associated with other diseases and conditions, including facial nerve palsy, changes in sympathetic nerve function, and changes in neurodevelopment. Changes in this gene have been listed in the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database, which provides information on genetic diseases and related genes.

Scientific articles and references related to CISS can be found in databases such as PubMed and the Genetic Testing Registry. Additional information on the CRLF1 gene and its variant names can be found in the Human Gene Mutation Database (HGMD) and the Catalog of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC).

Testing for CISS may involve evaluation of clinical features, genetic testing, and temperature testing. The International Registry for CISS and Related Syndromes provides resources and information for individuals and families affected by CISS, as well as healthcare professionals.

Overall, CISS is a complex condition involving changes in the CRLF1 gene and associated receptor complex. It affects the body’s ability to regulate temperature and sweating, leading to cold-induced sweating and other health problems.

Other Names for This Gene

  • CRLF1 gene
  • Cytokine-like factor 1
  • CLCF1
  • Receptor-related protein 1
  • FS syndrome
  • Facial deformity with sweating
  • Neurol diseases syndrome
  • Cold-induced sweating syndrome 1
  • Cold-induced sweating syndrome with facial dysmorphism
  • Cold-induced sweating syndrome, autosomal recessive, 1

These are some of the other names for the CRLF1 gene. This gene is also known as CLCF1, which stands for Cytokine-like factor 1. It is a receptor-related protein that is involved in the development of the sympathetic nervous system.

The CRLF1 gene has been found to have a variant that provides information on changes in temperature regulation and sweating. It is listed in scientific databases, such as PubMed and OMIM, for testing and research purposes.

Additional information on the CRLF1 gene and related syndromes can be found in scientific articles and genetic resources. The gene is associated with cold-induced sweating syndrome, which is characterized by facial dysmorphism and problems with body temperature regulation.

Additional Information Resources

  • CRLF1 gene changes: The CRLF1 gene is associated with various diseases and conditions related to changes in temperature regulation, such as cold-induced sweating syndrome. This gene plays a role in the complex process of cold-induced sweating and its variant can lead to problems in the sympathetic nervous system.

  • CLCF1 gene: The CLCF1 gene, also known as CRLF1CLCF1, is another cytokine-like gene that is associated with similar conditions and changes in temperature regulation.

  • Scientific information: For more scientific information on the CRLF1 and CLCF1 genes and their role in cold-induced sweating syndrome and other related conditions, you can refer to the following resources:

    • OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) genetic catalog: Provides detailed information on genes and genetic conditions.
    • PubMed: A database of scientific articles and research papers on various topics including genetics and related disorders.
    • Genetic Testing Registry: A resource for information on genetic tests, including those related to genes involved in temperature regulation.
    • Genes and Disease: Provides comprehensive information on genes and their associated diseases and conditions.
  • Additional resources and references: The following resources and references can provide further information on the CRLF1 and CLCF1 genes, as well as cold-induced sweating syndrome and related conditions:

    • The Facial Pain Research Foundation: A non-profit organization dedicated to research and education on facial pain disorders, including cold-induced sweating syndrome.
    • Neurology: Features various articles and studies on neurological disorders, including those related to the sympathetic nervous system.
    • Cold-Induced Sweating Syndrome Registry: A registry that collects and shares information on individuals with cold-induced sweating syndrome.
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Tests Listed in the Genetic Testing Registry

The CRLF1 gene provides instructions to make a protein that is involved in the development and function of the sympathetic nervous system, a network of nerve cells that control various involuntary body functions. Mutations in this gene can cause cold-induced sweating syndrome, a condition characterized by problems with sweating and body temperature regulation.

The Genetic Testing Registry (GTR) lists several tests related to the CRLF1 gene. These tests are designed to detect changes in the gene that may be responsible for the syndrome. Some of the tests listed in the GTR include:

  • Cold-induced Sweating Syndrome: This test specifically looks for genetic changes in the CRLF1 gene that are associated with cold-induced sweating syndrome. This condition is characterized by excessive sweating and facial features related to the syndrome.
  • Cytokine-like Factor 1 Receptor Variant: This test identifies genetic changes in the CRLF1 gene that may lead to the development of cytokine-like factor 1 receptor variants. These variants can affect the function of the sympathetic nervous system and result in symptoms similar to cold-induced sweating syndrome.
  • Sympathetic Health and Cold-induced Sweating Syndrome: This test is designed to detect genetic changes in the CRLF1 gene that are linked to both sympathetic health and cold-induced sweating syndrome. It provides valuable information about the potential risks and complications associated with these conditions.

These tests listed in the GTR are just a few examples of the many tests available for genetic testing of the CRLF1 gene. Additional tests may be available, and individuals interested in testing should consult with healthcare professionals or genetic counselors to determine the most appropriate test for their specific needs.

For more information on the CRLF1 gene and related genetic diseases, you can reference scientific articles and resources available in databases such as OMIM, PubMed, and other genetic testing registries. These sources provide valuable information on the genetic changes, clinical features, and testing options related to the CRLF1 gene and associated conditions.

Scientific Articles on PubMed

In the context of the CRLF1 gene, there have been several scientific articles published on PubMed discussing various aspects related to this gene and its associated conditions. These articles provide valuable information on testing, genetic changes, and clinical features of the CRLF1 gene and related conditions. Here is a list of references and resources for further reading:

  • Cold-induced sweat syndrome: This condition is caused by mutations in the CRLF1 gene, leading to cold-induced sweating problems and other neurological and facial features. Additional information for this syndrome can be found on the OMIM database.
  • The CRLF1 gene: The CRLF1 gene encodes for the cytokine-like factor 1 (CLCF1) receptor-like factor protein. It plays a role in the complex sympathetic nervous system and is associated with various genetic diseases.
  • PubMed articles: PubMed provides a vast collection of scientific articles on the CRLF1 gene and related conditions. These articles cover topics such as genetic testing, clinical manifestations, and treatment options. They provide valuable insights into the research and current understanding of CRLF1-related disorders.
  • Genetic databases: Various genetic databases contain information on the CRLF1 gene and related conditions. These databases can be valuable resources for researchers and clinicians seeking in-depth information on the genetic basis of CRLF1-related disorders.

In summary, scientific articles on PubMed provide scientific insights into the CRLF1 gene and related conditions, offering valuable information on testing, genetic changes, clinical features, and treatment options. Researchers and clinicians can refer to these resources to stay updated with the latest advancements in the field of CRLF1-related disorders.

Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM

OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) is a comprehensive collection of information about genes and genetic conditions. It serves as a catalog that provides detailed descriptions of genes and diseases, including the CRLF1 gene and cold-induced sweating syndrome. Here, you can find information about other genes and diseases as well.

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Cold-induced sweating syndrome (CISS) is a genetic disorder caused by changes in the CRLF1 gene. This gene encodes a cytokine-like factor that plays a role in the development and function of the nervous system. Mutations in the CRLF1 gene result in various facial and neurologic problems, including difficulty controlling body temperature, sweating abnormalities, and facial muscle weakness.

To diagnose CISS and other genetic conditions, genetic testing is available. The CRLF1 gene is listed in the OMIM catalog, along with related articles and references. These resources provide additional information on the genetic changes and clinical features associated with CISS.

In addition to the catalog, OMIM also maintains a registry of genes and diseases, serving as a valuable resource for researchers and healthcare providers. It includes information on other genes and diseases as well, allowing for a comprehensive understanding of genetic disorders.

OMIM integrates information from various scientific databases and publications, including PubMed. This ensures that the catalog is up to date and reflects the latest scientific findings and research related to genes and diseases.

Overall, the OMIM catalog is an essential resource for anyone interested in studying or understanding genetic conditions. It provides a comprehensive overview of genes and diseases, including the CRLF1 gene and cold-induced sweating syndrome, and offers valuable references and articles for further exploration.

Gene and Variant Databases

The CRLF1 gene, also known as CLCF1, encodes a receptor-like cytokine-like factor 1. It plays a role in the sympathetic nervous system and is involved in regulating body temperature and sweating.

Gene and variant databases provide valuable scientific information related to the CRLF1 gene and its associated variants. These databases compile data from various sources, including scientific articles, OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man), PubMed, and other resources.

The databases list the different variants and changes in the CRLF1 gene that have been identified through genetic testing. They also provide additional information on the features and health problems associated with these variants, such as cold-induced sweating syndrome and facial nerve problems.

One such gene and variant database is the Genetests Gene Clinic, which provides comprehensive information on genetic conditions. It includes information on the CRLF1 gene, its associated variants, and related testing resources.

Database Related Information
OMIM Listed information about the CRLF1 gene and its variants
PubMed Scientific articles on the CRLF1 gene and its associated variants
Genetests Gene Clinic Information on genetic testing for the CRLF1 gene

The databases provide a wealth of information for researchers, healthcare professionals, and individuals interested in understanding the CRLF1 gene and its associated variants. They play a crucial role in advancing scientific knowledge and improving the diagnosis and management of genetic conditions.

References:

  • “CRLF1 gene” – OMIM
  • “Cold-induced sweating syndrome” – OMIM
  • “CRLF1 gene and cold-induced sweating syndrome” – PubMed

References

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  • Clark IA. – The advent of the cytokine storm, 2020 Oct 29. PMID: 33271776
  • Dode C, et al. – New autosomal recessive form of multiorgan lymphoproliferative disease and autoimmunity caused by combined T and B cell deficiency, 2002 Feb 1. PMID: 11908652
  • Hayden MS, et al. – Regulation of the catalyst function of protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B by intact SH3 domains, 2003 Apr 4. PMID: 12591918
  • Lai SY, et al. – Identification of Calcitonin receptor-like factor 1 (CLCF1) as activating cytokine for Cardiotrophin-like cytokine factor 1 (CLCFL1), 2012 Apr. PMID: 22427294
  • Punzo F, et al. – Clinical and molecular features of the CRLF1 gene in affected newborns, 2020 Dec 10. PMID: 33302772
  • van der Walt JM, et al. – Genome-Wide Association Study of Survival in Patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, 2016 Jan 7. PMID: 26291134