Cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency is a rare genetic condition that affects both men and women. It is also known by other names such as POR deficiency and combined P450 oxidase deficiency. This condition is caused by mutations in the POR gene, which codes for the cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase enzyme.

Cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase is an essential enzyme that plays a crucial role in the development and functioning of several organs and systems in the body. Mutations in the POR gene lead to a deficiency of this enzyme, resulting in a wide range of symptoms and disorders.

The symptoms and severity of cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency can vary widely. Some individuals may have mild or moderate symptoms, while others may have more severe presentations. Common symptoms include disordered sexual development, ambiguous genitalia, hirsutism (excessive hair growth), and skeletal abnormalities.

Cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, meaning that both copies of the POR gene must be mutated for the condition to be present. Genetic testing can be used to diagnose the condition and identify the specific mutations. Additional testing may be done to assess the severity of the condition and evaluate associated disorders.

There is currently no cure for cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency, but management can help in minimizing the symptoms and improving the quality of life. Supportive care, hormone replacement therapy, and surgical interventions may be recommended based on individual needs.

For more information about cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency, you can refer to articles and resources available from the OMIM Catalog of Genetic Diseases, PubMed, and advocacy organizations such as the Cytochrome P450 Oxidoreductase Deficiency Support Center. Scientific studies and references can also provide additional insight into this rare condition.

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Frequency

Cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency is a rare genetic condition with an estimated frequency of 1 in 1 million individuals worldwide. It can occur in both males and females, but the exact incidence is not well-defined. The condition has been reported in various ethnic populations, including Caucasian, African, Asian, and Hispanic.

The frequency of cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency may be underestimated due to its variable clinical presentation and the lack of awareness among healthcare professionals. Additional research and testing are needed to determine its true prevalence.

According to the National Institutes of Health, cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. This means that an affected individual must inherit two copies of the mutated gene, one from each parent, to develop the condition. Carriers of a single copy of the mutated gene are usually asymptomatic.

Symptoms of cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency can vary widely and may include ambiguous genitalia, disordered sexual development, skeletal abnormalities, and hirsutism (excessive hair growth). Some individuals may also experience infertility or have difficulty conceiving.

The condition is often diagnosed through genetic testing, which can identify mutations in the cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase gene. This testing is usually done in specialized laboratories or genetic testing centers.

It is important for individuals with cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency and their families to seek support and information from advocacy groups, such as the Cytochrome P450 Oxidoreductase Deficiency Support and Advocacy Center. These organizations can provide resources, support, and information about the condition and available treatment options.

For more scientific information about cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency, interested individuals can refer to articles published in scientific journals. PubMed, a database of scientific articles, is a useful resource for finding relevant research on this topic.

In addition to cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency, there are other genetic disorders associated with disordered sexual development. These include 17-beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 3 deficiency, 17-alpha-hydroxylase deficiency, and aromatase deficiency, among others. These conditions may have overlapping symptoms and similar genetic inheritance patterns, making accurate diagnosis and genetic testing essential.

References:

  • Huang, N., et al. (2005). Inactivating Mutations of Cytochrome P450 Oxidoreductase in Antley-Bixler Syndrome. The Journal of Clinical Investigation, 115(8), 2120–2127.
  • Miller, W. L. (2013). Cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency. In GeneReviews((R)). University of Washington, Seattle. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK9968/
  • OMIM. (2021). Cytochrome P450 Oxidoreductase Deficiency. Retrieved from https://www.omim.org/entry/613571

Causes

The causes of cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency are not fully understood. This condition is believed to be caused by mutations in the POR gene, which provides instructions for making the cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase enzyme. Mutations in this gene can lead to a decrease in enzyme activity and disrupt the function of various other enzymes involved in steroid hormone synthesis and metabolism.

Approximately 40 different mutations in the POR gene have been identified in individuals with cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency. These mutations can result in the production of an unstable or nonfunctional enzyme, leading to the characteristic features and symptoms of the condition.

Cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. This means that affected individuals inherit two copies of the mutated gene, one from each parent. Parents of an individual with cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency typically carry one copy of the mutated gene, but do not show signs or symptoms of the condition themselves. Carriers of a single copy of the mutated gene are referred to as heterozygotes.

The condition can also be caused by de novo mutations, which are not inherited from a person’s parents and occur for the first time in the affected individual.

In addition to the known genetic causes, some cases of cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency may have other, as yet unidentified causes.

Learn more about the gene associated with Cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency

Cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency is a rare genetic disorder that affects multiple organ systems. It is usually caused by mutations in the POR gene, which provides instructions for making the cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase enzyme. This enzyme plays a key role in the metabolism of various substances in the body, including the production of steroids and other important molecules.

See also  Genetic Conditions S

Patients with cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency typically present with a wide range of symptoms, including moderate to severe impairment of steroid hormone production. The exact inheritance pattern of the condition is not fully understood, but it appears to be autosomal recessive, meaning that both copies of the gene must be mutated for the syndrome to occur. However, some studies suggest that there may be additional genetic factors that can modify the severity and presentation of the disorder.

For patients and families affected by cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency, it is essential to have access to resources and support. There are advocacy groups and patient support organizations that can provide information, guidance, and emotional support. Additionally, there are specialized centers that focus on the diagnosis and management of rare diseases, including cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency.

Genetic testing is usually recommended for individuals suspected of having cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency. This testing can identify mutations in the POR gene and help confirm the diagnosis. In addition, additional testing may be necessary to evaluate the function of the cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase enzyme and its impact on steroid hormone production.

More information about the causes, symptoms, and management of cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency can be found in the OMIM catalog, a comprehensive online resource for genetic diseases. PubMed, a database of scientific articles, can provide access to research studies and case reports on this condition and its associated genes. The Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) is also a valuable resource for learning more about cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency and other rare diseases.

In conclusion, cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency is a rare genetic condition that affects the development and function of multiple organ systems. The syndrome is usually caused by mutations in the POR gene, which leads to a disruption in steroid hormone production. Genetic testing, combined with studies and resources from OMIM, PubMed, and advocacy organizations, can provide essential support and information for patients and families affected by this rare disorder.

Inheritance

Cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency (also known as POR deficiency) is a rare genetic disorder that is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. This means that both copies of the gene responsible for the disorder must be mutated for the condition to be present.

Information about the genes associated with cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency, including their names and functions, can be found in databases such as OMIM and Genet. These resources provide support for genetic testing and can help healthcare professionals determine the precise cause of the patient’s symptoms.

Inheritance of this condition can result in a range of moderate to severe disorders, including skeletal and sexual developmental abnormalities, as well as ambiguous genitalia in some cases. Scientific studies, such as those published on PubMed, have shed light on the causes and frequency of these disorders.

One such study by Huang and Miller (Clin Genet. 2018) found that mutations in the POR gene were associated with disordered sexual development and hirsutism in women. Additional studies have also identified other causes of these disorders, further expanding our understanding of the condition.

Genetic testing plays a crucial role in diagnosing cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency and determining its inheritance pattern. Testing can help identify mutations in the POR gene and provide valuable information for genetic counseling and family planning.

  • Miller Children’s & Women’s Hospital: Cytochrome P450 Oxidoreductase Deficiency
  • Cytochrome P450 Oxidoreductase Deficiency Advocacy and Support: CPORD Support
  • OMIM Catalog of Human Genes and Genetic Disorders: OMIM
  • Genet Journal: Genet
Resources for support and information:

Overall, cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency is a rare condition with a complex inheritance pattern. Genetic testing and the support of advocacy groups and scientific resources are crucial in understanding and managing this condition.

Other Names for This Condition

  • Genetic deficiency of cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase
  • Cytochrome p450 oxidoreductase deficiency
  • ORD
  • CYPOR deficiency
  • Gene deficiency of cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase
  • CYPOR

Other names for this condition include genetic deficiency of cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase, cytochrome p450 oxidoreductase deficiency, ORD, CYPOR deficiency, and gene deficiency of cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase. It is a rare genetic disorder characterized by a deficiency of the cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase enzyme, which is essential for the metabolism of certain drugs, hormones, and toxins in the body.

Patients with cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency may present with a wide range of symptoms, including ambiguous genitalia, disordered skeletal development, hirsutism in women, and other apparent causes of sex hormone imbalance. The condition is usually inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, meaning that both copies of the gene must be mutated for the condition to be present.

Genetic studies have identified mutations in the POR gene as the cause of cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency. Additional research is ongoing to learn more about the frequency of this condition and its associated signs and symptoms. Testing for cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency may be available through specialized laboratories and can be done by sequencing the POR gene.

Support groups and advocacy organizations can provide additional information and resources for patients and families affected by cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency. The OMIM and PubMed databases are valuable sources of scientific articles and references for further reading on this rare condition.

Additional Information Resources

  • The Cytochrome P450 Oxidoreductase Deficiency Support and Advocacy Network (CPXN) is a combined effort of patient advocacy groups, clinicians, and scientists to provide support and information for individuals affected by this rare disorder. They have a website that offers resources and a forum for patients, families, and healthcare professionals to connect and share information. The CPXN also organizes conferences and workshops to promote education and awareness about the syndrome.
  • The OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) database provides comprehensive information on the genetic causes of diseases. It includes a detailed entry for Cytochrome P450 Oxidoreductase Deficiency, with references to scientific articles and other resources.
  • The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) provides a database called PubMed, which is a valuable resource for finding scientific articles related to Cytochrome P450 Oxidoreductase Deficiency. Searching for keywords like “cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency” or “P450OR deficiency” will yield a list of relevant publications.
  • The skeletal Dysplasia Management Consortium (SDMC) is a center that specializes in the diagnosis and management of rare skeletal disorders, including those associated with Cytochrome P450 Oxidoreductase Deficiency. They offer clinical services, genetic testing, and resources for patients and healthcare professionals.
  • The Developmental Genes and Disease Research Group at the Miller School of Medicine in the University of Miami focuses on understanding the genetic basis of developmental disorders. They have conducted extensive research on Cytochrome P450 Oxidoreductase Deficiency and offer resources and information on their website.
See also  Trisomy 18

Additional resources and information on Cytochrome P450 Oxidoreductase Deficiency can be found through these organizations and websites. It is essential for patients, families, and healthcare professionals to learn about this rare genetic condition and its associated diseases to provide appropriate support and care.

Genetic Testing Information

Genetic testing can play a crucial role in the diagnosis and management of Cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency (ORD). By identifying specific gene mutations associated with this condition, genetic testing can provide important information about the underlying cause of the disorder and help guide treatment decisions.

Studies have shown that mutations in the POR gene are the primary cause of ORD. These mutations can disrupt the normal function of the Cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase enzyme, leading to a range of symptoms and complications.

ORD is a rare genetic disorder, with an estimated frequency of around 1 in 1 million births. It is usually inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, meaning that both parents must carry a copy of the mutated gene for their child to be affected. However, some cases may be caused by de novo mutations, which occur spontaneously in the affected individual and are not inherited from their parents.

Patients with ORD often present with disordered sexual development and genital abnormalities. In males, this can include undescended testes, hypospadias, and infertility. Females may experience ambiguous genitalia, primary amenorrhea, and infertility. Additional symptoms can include skeletal abnormalities, hirsutism, and adrenal dysfunction.

Genetic testing for ORD can be performed to confirm a diagnosis and identify specific gene mutations. This testing may involve sequencing the POR gene to detect mutations or using other techniques such as deletion/duplication analysis or biochemical assays.

There are several resources available for patients and families seeking more information about ORD and genetic testing. The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database provides detailed information about the disorder, including its clinical features, inheritance pattern, and associated genes. The Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) also offers resources and support for individuals affected by rare disorders.

In addition to genetic testing, other diagnostic methods may be used to evaluate patients with suspected ORD. These can include hormone testing, imaging studies, and adrenal function tests.

It is important for healthcare providers and genetic counselors to stay informed about the latest research and advancements in the understanding of ORD. Scientific articles and references from PubMed can provide valuable information and insights into the condition.

Genetic testing and counseling are essential for patients and families affected by ORD. They can provide valuable information about the inheritance pattern, recurrence risk, and available treatment options. Genetic testing can also help in identifying other causes of similar disorders and ensuring accurate diagnosis.

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center

The Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) provides information on genetic and rare diseases for both healthcare professionals and the general public. GARD is a combined effort of two agencies – the Office of Rare Diseases Research (ORDR) and the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI).

One rare genetic condition that GARD provides information about is Cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency. This condition is caused by mutations in the POR gene, which provides instructions for making the cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase enzyme. Mutations in this gene can result in a moderate to severe deficiency of the enzyme.

Cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency affects the production of several hormones, including those involved in sexual development. As a result, this condition can cause both ambiguous genitalia and other sexual abnormalities. In addition, it may be associated with skeletal malformations and other disorders.

Testing for Cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency typically involves genetic testing to identify mutations in the POR gene. Additional testing may be done to evaluate the specific effects of the enzyme deficiency on hormone levels and identify any associated disorders.

Treatment for Cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency is focused on managing the specific symptoms and complications of the condition. This may include hormonal therapy to address sexual abnormalities and skeletal abnormalities.

References:

  1. Huang N, Pandey AV, Agrawal V, Miller WL. GeneReviews®: Cytochrome P450 Oxidoreductase Deficiency. 2010 Apr 22 [Updated 2018 Jun 28]. In: Adam MP, Ardinger HH, Pagon RA, et al., editors. GeneReviews®. Seattle (WA): University of Washington, Seattle; 1993-2021. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK222267/.
  2. Huang N, Pandey AV, Agrawal V, Miller WL. Cytochrome P450 Oxidoreductase Deficiency. In: Adam MP, Ardinger HH, Pagon RA, et al., editors. GeneReviews®. Seattle (WA): University of Washington, Seattle; 1993-2021. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK222267/.

For more information and resources on Cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency, you can visit the following websites:

  • Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center – Provides information about the condition, its symptoms, causes, inheritance, and more. Additionally, you can find advocacy and support resources.
  • Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) – Contains essential scientific information about the genes and genetic disorders associated with Cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency.
  • PubMed – Offers scientific articles and studies related to Cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency for further learning and research.

Patient Support and Advocacy Resources

Patients diagnosed with Cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency can benefit from the support and resources offered by various patient advocacy organizations. These organizations aim to provide information, raise awareness, and offer support to individuals and families affected by this rare genetic condition.

Clinical Resources

  • Combined Pituitary Hormone Deficiency Resource Center: Learn more about combined pituitary hormone deficiency, which is often associated with Cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency. Visit their website to access valuable resources and support.
  • Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center: Find valuable resources, research articles, and information about rare diseases. Visit their website to learn more about Cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency and related conditions.
  • Human Gene Mutation Database (HGMD): Access the HGMD database to explore the genetic mutations and their associated diseases. Learn more here.
  • OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man): Discover the latest research and scientific information about Cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency. Visit OMIM for detailed genetic information and related syndromes.
See also  CRB1 gene

Patient Advocacy Organizations

  • Cytochrome P450 Oxidoreductase Deficiency Advocacy Group: This group provides support to patients, families, and healthcare professionals through education, advocacy, and community outreach. Visit their website to access their resources and join their community.
  • Genetic and Rare Diseases (GARD) Information Center: GARD offers resources, support, and advocacy for patients with rare genetic diseases. Explore their resources here.
  • Global Genes: Global Genes is a leading rare disease patient advocacy organization that provides support and resources for patients, families, and caregivers. Learn more about their mission here.

These resources can offer valuable information and support to patients and families affected by Cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency. By staying informed, seeking support, and advocating for their needs, individuals with this condition can lead healthier and more fulfilling lives. It is essential to consult with healthcare professionals and genetic counselors for accurate diagnosis, testing, and guidance.

Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM

The Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM is a comprehensive resource that provides information about various genetic disorders. It contains detailed information about the genes associated with these diseases and the clinical features and symptoms of each disorder.

One of the genetic disorders listed in the catalog is Cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency (also known as Miller Syndrome). This condition is caused by mutations in the CYB5R3 gene, which encodes the cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase enzyme. The deficiency of this enzyme leads to the development of various skeletal and other developmental abnormalities.

Patients with Cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency may present with ambiguous genitalia, moderate to severe developmental delay, intellectual disability, hirsutism, and other features. The exact manifestation of the syndrome can vary widely among individuals.

Support for the diagnosis of Cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency can be obtained through genetic testing, which can identify mutations in the CYB5R3 gene. Genetic testing is usually performed in specialized genetic testing centers.

The frequency of Cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency is unknown, but it is considered a rare condition. More scientific studies and articles about this syndrome can be found on PubMed, which is a comprehensive database of scientific articles.

For more information about Cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency and other genetic disorders, the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database provides detailed descriptions, references, and other resources.

References:

  1. Pandey, A., et al. “Cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency caused by R457H mutation in POR gene in Chinese.” J Pediatr Genet. 2020 Mar;9(1):45-48. doi: 10.1055/s-0039-1696673. PMID: 32051881.
  2. Huang, N., et al. “Identification and functional characterization of cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase gene mutations in five Chinese patients with Antley-Bixler syndrome.” J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2005 May;90(5):2608-15. doi: 10.1210/jc.2004-1692. PMID: 15713701.
  3. GeneReviews [Internet]. Seattle (WA): University of Washington, Seattle; 1993-. Cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency. Updated 2019 May 16. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK99706/

Scientific Articles on PubMed

PubMed is a valuable resource for scientific articles related to Cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency. This genetic condition is also known as POR deficiency and is characterized by combined deficiencies of multiple enzymes involved in steroidogenic pathways.

Studies have shown that POR deficiency can present with a range of symptoms, including hirsutism, ambiguous genitalia, and skeletal abnormalities. Patient testing for cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency can be done to confirm the diagnosis.

There are several articles available on PubMed that provide more information about the condition. These articles discuss the genetic inheritance, clinical presentation, and testing methods for cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency. Some additional resources include the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) catalog and the Genetic Testing Registry.

One study, conducted by Huang et al., focused on the phenotype and genotype of women with cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency. The researchers found that the condition often presents with sexual development disorders and hirsutism. The study also identified several novel mutations in the POR gene.

Another article by Pandey et al. explored the clinical and genetic characteristics of patients with cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency. The researchers highlighted the importance of testing and diagnosis in patients with apparent rare diseases and emphasized the need for support and advocacy for those affected.

In addition to cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency, there are other causes of disorders of sexual development. Miller et al. discussed additional genes associated with these conditions. They identified several genes that are involved in sexual development and noted that mutations in these genes can result in a variety of phenotypes.

Overall, PubMed is an essential resource for learning more about cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency and related conditions. The articles available provide valuable information about the genetics, clinical presentation, and testing methods for these rare genetic diseases. The information obtained from PubMed can support clinicians in making accurate diagnoses and providing appropriate care to affected individuals.

References

  • Huang, N., Pandey, A. V., Agrawal, V., Reardon, W., Lapunzina, P. D., Mowat, D., … & Miller, W. L. (2005). Diversity and function of mutations in p450 oxidoreductase in patients with Antley-Bixler syndrome and disordered steroidogenesis. The Journal of clinical endocrinology & metabolism, 90(1), 100-109.
  • Huang, N., Agrawal, V., Giacomini, K. M., Miller, W. L. (2011). Genetics of P450 oxidoreductase: sequence variation in individuals of European and African ancestry, and a comprehensive catalog of missense variants. Pharmacogenetics and genomics, 21(4), 240-249.
  • OMIM. (2022). Cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency. Retrieved from https://www.omim.org/entry/613571.
  • Pandey, A. V., Kempna, P., Hofer, G., & Mullis, P. E. (2007). Human P450 oxidoreductase deficiency. The Lancet. 369(9567), 1968-1976.
  • Huang, N., & Miller, W. L. (2013). Loss of function of P450 oxidoreductase in humans: prevalence in Japan and activities of naturally occurring mutations in purified recombinant proteins. The Journal of clinical endocrinology & metabolism, 98(8), E1300-E1307.
  • Genetics Home Reference. (2022). Cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency. Retrieved from https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/cytochrome-p450-oxidoreductase-deficiency.
  • Pandey, A.V., Flück, C.E., N°ørgård, M. et al. (2004). Impact of mutations affecting the cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase gene on human steroidogenesis. Pharmacogenet Genomics, 14, 1–15.
  • Pandey, A. V., Flück, C. E., Mullis, P. E. (2004). Altered heme catabolism by heme oxygenase-1 caused by mutations in human NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase. Biochemical and biophysical research communications, 318(3), 677-681.
  • Huang, N., & Miller, W. L. (2016). Loss of function of cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase in human disease: Clinical interpretations and challenges. Molecular and cellular endocrinology, 441, 353-361.