Factor XIII deficiency is a rare inherited blood clotting disorder characterized by a deficiency or dysfunction in the factor XIII protein, which is crucial for normal blood clotting. This condition is also known as fibrin stabilization factor deficiency.

Factor XIII deficiency can be classified into two main forms: congenital, which is present from birth, and acquired, which occurs later in life due to other underlying diseases or immune-related conditions. The congenital form of factor XIII deficiency is usually caused by mutations in the F13A1 or F13B genes, while the acquired form can be caused by factors such as liver disease, certain medications, or immune system disorders.

Clinically, individuals with factor XIII deficiency may present with excessive bleeding after injury or surgery, delayed wound healing, and spontaneous bleeding into joints. Diagnosis of factor XIII deficiency is confirmed through blood tests that measure factor XIII activity levels. Genetic testing can also be performed to identify specific mutations in the F13A1 or F13B genes.

Treatment for factor XIII deficiency typically involves regular infusions of factor XIII concentrate to replace the missing protein. Supportive care is also provided to manage bleeding episodes and prevent complications. In rare cases, bone marrow transplantation may be considered as a potential cure for factor XIII deficiency.

More scientific articles and studies about factor XIII deficiency can be found on PubMed, a free online database of scientific articles. Additionally, information about ongoing clinical trials related to factor XIII deficiency can be found on ClinicalTrials.gov, a website that provides access to information about clinical research studies.

For additional resources and support, individuals affected by factor XIII deficiency and their families can seek assistance from advocacy organizations such as the World Federation of Hemophilia or the National Hemophilia Foundation. These organizations provide educational materials, support networks, and information about genetic testing and counseling.

In studies, the artificial intelligence (AI) technology used in some online health services for preliminary screening before connecting patients with a doctor actually outperformed real physicians in terms of reaching an accurate diagnosis, CNN AI technology correctly diagnosed conditions in 81% of patients, compared to a 72% average for accurate diagnoses among real physicians over a five-year period.

In conclusion, factor XIII deficiency is a rare genetic disorder that affects the coagulation pathway and can lead to excessive bleeding. It can be inherited or acquired and is caused by mutations in the F13A1 or F13B genes. Diagnosis is made through blood tests and genetic testing, and treatment involves replacement therapy with factor XIII concentrate. Ongoing research and clinical trials aim to further understand the condition and develop new treatment options.

Frequency

Factor XIII deficiency is a rare genetic condition associated with a decreased level or activity of the clotting protein factor XIII (F13). It is estimated that this condition affects around 1 in every 2 million people worldwide. However, the frequency can vary depending on the population being studied.

Research has identified two forms of factor XIII deficiency: the severe form and the mild form. The severe form is more common and accounts for about 90 percent of affected individuals.

F13 deficiency is usually inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, which means that both copies of the F13A1 or F13B gene must be altered for a person to be affected. The F13A1 gene provides instructions for making the A subunit of factor XIII, while the F13B gene provides instructions for making the B subunit.

Acquired factor XIII deficiency can also occur as a result of other conditions, such as liver disease, autoimmune diseases, or certain medications. These acquired forms are not inherited and are generally more rare.

Diagnosis of factor XIII deficiency can be made through blood tests that measure the activity and level of factor XIII. Genetic testing is also available to identify mutations in the F13A1 or F13B genes. Additional testing may be done to determine the specific type of factor XIII deficiency and to rule out acquired causes.

Information about clinical trials related to factor XIII deficiency can be found on ClinicalTrials.gov. The National Hemophilia Foundation’s MASAC recommendations provide guidelines for the management of this condition, and resources for patient support and advocacy are available through the World Federation of Hemophilia and other organizations.

Scientific articles about factor XIII deficiency can be found on PubMed, the online catalog of biomedical literature. The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database also provides information on this condition and its associated genes.

Further research is needed to better understand the genetic and molecular mechanisms underlying factor XIII deficiency and to develop more effective treatments for affected individuals.

Causes

  • Factor XIII deficiency, also known as F13 deficiency, is a rare genetic condition caused by mutations in the F13A1 or F13B genes.
  • These mutations result in a lack or dysfunction of the Factor XIII protein, which is responsible for stabilizing blood clots.
  • There are also rare acquired forms of Factor XIII deficiency which can be caused by other diseases or immune responses.

Inheritance

Factor XIII deficiency can be inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, meaning that an individual must inherit two copies of the mutated gene to have the condition. If both parents are carriers of the mutated gene, each of their children will have a 25% chance of having Factor XIII deficiency.

Clinical Presentation

Factor XIII deficiency can present with a wide range of symptoms and severity. Some individuals may have no symptoms at all, while others may experience excessive bleeding, delayed wound healing, or spontaneous bleeding into joints and muscles.

Diagnosis

Diagnosis of Factor XIII deficiency is typically confirmed through blood tests that measure the level and activity of Factor XIII. Genetic testing can also be done to identify the specific mutations in the F13A1 or F13B genes.

Treatment and Management

There is currently no cure for Factor XIII deficiency, but supportive care and treatment can help manage symptoms and prevent complications. This can include regular infusions of Factor XIII concentrate, as well as measures to control bleeding during surgery or trauma.

Additional Resources and Support

For more information about Factor XIII deficiency, inherited bleeding disorders, and advocacy and support resources, please refer to the following:

  • National Hemophilia Foundation (https://www.hemophilia.org/)
  • World Federation of Hemophilia (https://www.wfh.org/)
  • CDC – Inherited Bleeding Disorders: Frequently Asked Questions (https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/spanish/blooddisorders/faqs.html)

For scientific research articles, clinical trials, and additional genetic and clinical information, the following resources can be consulted:

Learn more about the genes associated with Factor XIII deficiency

Factor XIII deficiency, also known as Fibrin-Stabilizing Factor deficiency, is a rare inherited coagulation disorder that affects the blood’s ability to clot properly. This condition is caused by mutations in the F13A1 or F13B genes, which provide instructions for making the Factor XIII A subunit and Factor XIII B subunit, respectively.

See also  Ochoa syndrome

Factor XIII is a protein important in the final stages of blood clot formation. The F13A1 gene is located on chromosome 6 and the F13B gene is located on chromosome 1. Mutations in either gene can result in a deficiency of Factor XIII activity, leading to bleeding disorders.

These genes can be cataloged in various genetic resources such as OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) and PubMed. OMIM provides detailed information about the genetic causes of Factor XIII deficiency, including inheritance patterns, genetic testing options, and researched articles related to this condition. PubMed also offers scientific articles and research studies on Factor XIII deficiency and its genetic implications.

In addition to the F13A1 and F13B genes, other genes and factors can also contribute to the development of Factor XIII deficiency. Acquired forms of the condition can occur due to liver disease, immune disorders, or other underlying diseases affecting the clotting process. It is important to consider the various factors and genes associated with this condition for accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment.

Learning more about the genes associated with Factor XIII deficiency can provide valuable information for patients, healthcare professionals, and researchers. Understanding the genetic basis of this condition can aid in diagnosis, treatment decisions, and ongoing research to improve patient outcomes.

For more information about Factor XIII deficiency and related genes, the National Hemophilia Foundation and other patient advocacy organizations provide resources and support for affected individuals and their families. ClinicalTrials.gov is also a valuable resource to find ongoing clinical studies and trials focused on Factor XIII deficiency and potential treatment options.

References:

Inheritance

The condition of Factor XIII deficiency is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. This means that individuals need to inherit two copies of the defective gene, one from each parent, in order to be affected by the condition.

XIII deficiency is caused by mutations in the F13A1 gene and the F13B gene. These genes provide instructions for making proteins that are necessary for normal blood clotting. Mutations in either of these genes can result in a deficiency of Factor XIII.

The inheritance pattern may be more complex in some cases, as additional genes may be associated with XIII deficiency. In rare cases, Factor XIII deficiency may also be acquired rather than inherited, due to immune system disorders or other diseases.

Genetic testing can help with the diagnosis of Factor XIII deficiency and determine the specific gene mutations involved. This testing can also be used to determine if a patient has inherited the condition from their parents.

For patients with Factor XIII deficiency, there are resources and support available. The Factor XIII Deficiency Registry is a repository of information and resources for patients and healthcare providers. Other advocacy organizations and research centers may also offer support and information on Factor XIII deficiency.

The frequency of Factor XIII deficiency is estimated to be less than 1 in 1 million people worldwide. It is considered a rare condition. More research and clinical studies are needed to further understand the causes and forms of Factor XIII deficiency.

For more information about Factor XIII deficiency, you can visit the following resources:

  • The Factor XIII Deficiency Registry
  • PubMed – a database of scientific articles
  • OMIM – a catalog of human genes and genetic diseases
  • ClinicalTrials.gov – a database of clinical studies

Other Names for This Condition

Factor XIII deficiency may also be known by other names, including:

  • Acquired factor XIII deficiency
  • Clinicaltrialsgov – Factor XIII deficiency
  • Factor XIII congenital disorder
  • Factor XIII deficiency, congenital
  • F13B gene deficiency
  • Factor XIIIA deficiency
  • Fibrin-stabilizing factor deficiency
  • FXIICD
  • Inherited factor XIII deficiency
  • Rare factor deficiency

These names for factor XIII deficiency are used to support further research, diagnosis, genetic testing, and advocacy for affected individuals. They can also be found in articles and resources related to this condition.

For more information about factor XIII deficiency, its causes, inheritance, and associated genes, you can visit websites like OMIM, PubMed, and ClinicalTrials.gov. These resources provide additional information, research studies, and references for learning more about this rare blood coagulation disorder.

Additional Information Resources

  • Learn More about Factor XIII Deficiency:
    • Get more information on factor XIII deficiency from the clinicaltrials.gov website.
    • Explore scientific articles associated with factor XIII deficiency on PubMed.
    • Find out about the genetic aspects of factor XIII deficiency on OMIM.
  • Clinical Trials and Studies:
    • Discover ongoing clinical trials and studies related to factor XIII deficiency on clinicaltrials.gov.
    • Read more about the inheritance pattern and genes associated with factor XIII deficiency on OMIM.
  • Support and Advocacy:
    • Connect with advocacy groups and support networks for individuals affected by factor XIII deficiency.
    • Learn more about the causes, diagnosis, and treatment options for factor XIII deficiency from reputable organizations and medical centers.
  • Additional Resources:
    • Get more information about the frequency and different forms (including rare forms) of factor XIII deficiency from medical references.
    • Find out about acquired factor XIII deficiency and other diseases associated with this condition.
    • Explore the role of factor XIII in the coagulation cascade and the importance of this blood clotting factor.
    • Find other articles and research papers on factor XIII deficiency for more in-depth knowledge.

Genetic Testing Information

F13B and F13A1 are the two genes that have been identified as causing Factor XIII deficiency in patients with this rare blood coagulation disorder. Genetic testing for these genes can provide valuable information for diagnosis and patient management.

Genetic testing resources for Factor XIII deficiency can be found at various websites and organizations. These resources provide more information about the condition, genetic testing, and support for affected individuals and their families. Some of the recommended resources include:

  • ClinicalTrials.gov: This website provides information on ongoing clinical trials and research studies related to Factor XIII deficiency. It also offers information on treatment options and additional resources.

  • OMIM: The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) is a comprehensive catalog of human genes and genetic disorders. OMIM provides detailed information on the genetic basis of Factor XIII deficiency and associated conditions.

  • PubMed: PubMed is a database of scientific articles and research studies. It contains a wealth of information on Factor XIII deficiency, including studies on the genetics, diagnosis, and management of the condition.

  • Factor XIII Deficiency Registry: This registry collects and stores information about patients with Factor XIII deficiency. It also provides resources and support for affected individuals and their families.

  • Factor VIII and Factor XIII Resource Center: This resource center offers information, support, and advocacy for individuals with Factor XIII deficiency. It also provides educational materials and resources for healthcare professionals.

Genetic testing can help determine the genetic cause of Factor XIII deficiency in affected individuals. It can also assist with genetic counseling, family planning, and early diagnosis in at-risk individuals. The inheritance pattern of Factor XIII deficiency is autosomal recessive, meaning that both copies of the F13B or F13A1 gene must be altered for the condition to be present.

See also  ADGRG1 gene

The frequency of Factor XIII deficiency in the general population is estimated to be less than 1 in 2 million individuals. However, the condition may be more common in certain populations or geographic regions. Acquired forms of Factor XIII deficiency, which are not caused by genetic mutations, can also occur.

Further research and scientific studies are ongoing to better understand the genetic basis and clinical manifestations of Factor XIII deficiency. It is important for patients and healthcare providers to stay informed and learn from the latest research and advancements in this field.

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center

The Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) is a valuable resource for information about genetic and rare diseases. GARD provides a comprehensive catalog of articles and additional resources on various genetic and rare diseases, including Factor XIII deficiency.

Factor XIII deficiency is a rare genetic condition that affects the blood’s ability to clot. It is caused by mutations in the F13A1 or F13B gene, which provide instructions for making the protein factor XIII. This protein plays a crucial role in the final stages of blood coagulation, helping to stabilize blood clots and promote wound healing.

There are two forms of Factor XIII deficiency: congenital and acquired. The congenital form is inherited and present from birth, while the acquired form is caused by other factors such as immune system disorders or liver disease. Both forms can lead to increased bleeding and delayed wound healing.

To diagnose Factor XIII deficiency, genetic testing can be performed to identify mutations in the F13A1 or F13B gene. This testing can confirm the presence of the condition and determine its specific genetic cause.

Treatment for Factor XIII deficiency typically involves replacing the missing factor XIII protein. This can be done through regular infusions of factor XIII concentrates derived from donated blood or through recombinant DNA technology.

Research studies and clinical trials, listed on ClinicalTrials.gov, are actively investigating new treatment options and potential therapies for Factor XIII deficiency. These studies offer hope for improved outcomes and quality of life for affected individuals and their families. Seeking participation in a clinical trial should be discussed with a healthcare provider.

Advocacy and support organizations, such as the National Hemophilia Foundation and the World Federation of Hemophilia, can provide additional information, resources, and support for individuals and families affected by Factor XIII deficiency.

References:

  1. OMIM – Factor XIII Deficiency: https://www.omim.org/entry/613225
  2. PubMed – Factor XIII Deficiency: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/?term=Factor+XIII+deficiency
  3. ClinicalTrials.gov – Factor XIII Deficiency: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/results?cond=Factor+XIII+deficiency

Patient Support and Advocacy Resources

Factor XIII deficiency is a rare inherited coagulation disorder caused by mutations in the F13A1 or F13B genes. This condition affects the clotting factor responsible for stabilizing blood clots, leading to an increased risk of bleeding and poor wound healing.

If you or someone you know has been diagnosed with Factor XIII deficiency, there are a variety of patient support and advocacy resources available. These resources can provide valuable information, support, and connections to other individuals living with the condition.

Factor XIII Deficiency Support and Advocacy Centers

  • Factor XIII Research and Advocacy Center: This center is dedicated to advancing research and advocacy for Factor XIII deficiency. They offer educational resources, support groups, and information on clinical trials.
  • National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD): NORD is a trusted source of information and support for patients with rare diseases. They offer resources specific to Factor XIII deficiency, including a patient registry and a helpline.

Genetic Testing and Diagnosis

Genetic testing is often used to confirm a diagnosis of Factor XIII deficiency and identify the specific gene mutation. The results of these tests can provide important information about inheritance patterns and potential risks for affected individuals and their families.

Some resources for genetic testing and diagnosis include:

  • ClinicalTrials.gov: This website provides information on current clinical trials studying Factor XIII deficiency. Clinical trials can offer opportunities for eligible individuals to participate in research and access new treatments.
  • OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man): OMIM is a comprehensive database of genes and genetic disorders. It provides detailed information on the F13A1 and F13B genes associated with Factor XIII deficiency.
  • PubMed: PubMed is a resource for scientific articles and research on various medical conditions. It can be used to find studies and publications related to the genetics, diagnosis, and treatment of Factor XIII deficiency.

Additional Resources

In addition to the resources mentioned above, there are several other organizations and websites that provide support, information, and advocacy for individuals with Factor XIII deficiency. These include:

  • World Federation of Hemophilia: This international organization is dedicated to improving the lives of people with bleeding disorders, including Factor XIII deficiency. They provide educational materials, support networks, and advocacy initiatives.
  • National Hemophilia Foundation (NHF): NHF is a leading resource for information and support for individuals with bleeding disorders. They offer educational materials, advocacy resources, and access to treatment centers.
  • Factor XIII Deficiency Registry: This registry collects data on individuals with Factor XIII deficiency to contribute to research and improve understanding of the condition. By participating in the registry, patients can help drive advancements in diagnosis and treatment.

Remember, patient support and advocacy resources can provide valuable information, support, and connections to others facing similar challenges. If you or a loved one is affected by Factor XIII deficiency, it is important to reach out and learn more about the available resources.

Research Studies from ClinicalTrials.gov

ClinicalTrials.gov is a comprehensive database that provides information about clinical research studies being conducted worldwide. It offers valuable resources for patients, healthcare providers, and researchers interested in Factor XIII deficiency and other rare conditions.

Factor XIII deficiency is a rare inherited disorder that affects the blood coagulation process. It is caused by mutations in the F13A1 or F13B gene, which are responsible for producing the factor XIII protein. These mutations can result in a reduced or absent factor XIII protein, leading to increased bleeding and delayed wound healing.

Research studies listed on ClinicalTrials.gov aim to improve our understanding of Factor XIII deficiency and develop new treatment options. These studies investigate various aspects of the condition, such as its frequency, genetic causes, associated genes, and immune system involvement.

Patients diagnosed with Factor XIII deficiency can find information on clinical trials that may be available to them. These trials test new therapies, diagnostic methods, and interventions to improve patient outcomes and quality of life.

In addition to clinical trials, ClinicalTrials.gov provides references to articles and research resources related to Factor XIII deficiency. These resources can support patients, healthcare providers, and researchers in their quest to learn more about the condition.

It is important to note that Factor XIII deficiency has different forms, and some forms are more common than others. The acquired form of Factor XIII deficiency, which occurs due to other diseases or conditions, is more prevalent than the inherited form.

ClinicalTrials.gov also includes information on other rare conditions and genetic disorders. Patients and their families can find resources and support from advocacy groups that specialize in rare diseases.

For more scientific information about Factor XIII deficiency, researchers can refer to resources such as OMIM, PubMed, and various coagulation factor catalogs. These sources provide detailed information about the genetics, diagnosis, and management of Factor XIII deficiency.

See also  Intrauterine growth restriction metaphyseal dysplasia adrenal hypoplasia congenita and genital anomalies

In summary, ClinicalTrials.gov is a valuable resource for individuals interested in Factor XIII deficiency and other rare genetic disorders. It provides access to research studies, clinical trials, articles, and additional resources that can support patients, healthcare providers, and researchers in their quest for knowledge and advancements in the field.

Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM

The catalog of genes and diseases from OMIM provides a comprehensive resource for information on Factor XIII deficiency. This rare condition affects the coagulation system and is associated with abnormalities in the genes F13A1 and F13B.

Factor XIII deficiency is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, meaning that individuals must inherit a copy of the abnormal gene from both parents to develop the condition. There are multiple forms of Factor XIII deficiency, each with its own unique genetic cause.

Diagnosis of Factor XIII deficiency is typically made based on clinical symptoms, such as bleeding disorders or recurrent miscarriages, as well as laboratory testing to measure Factor XIII activity in the bloodstream. Additional studies, including genetic testing, may be required to confirm the diagnosis.

OMIM provides a catalog of scientific articles, references, and other resources related to Factor XIII deficiency. This includes information on the frequency of the condition, associated diseases, and available treatments.

In addition to genetic causes, Factor XIII deficiency can also be acquired due to immune system dysfunction or other factors. The precise mechanisms underlying the development of acquired Factor XIII deficiency are not fully understood.

Patients with Factor XIII deficiency may benefit from support and advocacy groups that provide information and resources for living with the condition. ClinicalTrials.gov is a valuable resource for finding ongoing clinical trials and research studies related to Factor XIII deficiency.

For more information on Factor XIII deficiency and related genes, OMIM is an essential resource. It provides comprehensive information on the inheritance patterns, clinical features, and molecular basis of this condition.

Genes Diseases
F13A1 Factor XIII deficiency
F13B Factor XIII deficiency

Scientific Articles on PubMed

Factor XIII deficiency, also known as fibrin-stabilizing factor deficiency, is a rare inherited coagulation disorder characterized by the impaired function of factor XIII, a protein involved in blood clot formation.

Individuals with factor XIII deficiency have a higher risk of bleeding, delayed wound healing, and abnormal scar formation. This condition can be caused by mutations in the F13A1 or F13B genes, which are responsible for producing the two subunits of factor XIII.

There is limited information available on factor XIII deficiency due to its rarity. However, several scientific articles can provide valuable insights into this condition. PubMed, a widely used resource for scientific literature, offers a vast catalog of articles related to factor XIII deficiency. These articles cover various aspects of the condition, including clinical studies, genetic research, and diagnostic testing.

Here are some additional resources for learning more about factor XIII deficiency:

  • ClinicalTrials.gov: This website provides information on ongoing clinical trials for factor XIII deficiency and other rare diseases.
  • OMIM: The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database offers detailed information about factor XIII deficiency and associated genes.

Advocacy organizations and patient support groups can also be helpful in providing support and information to individuals affected by factor XIII deficiency. These organizations often have resources and networks that can connect patients and their families to a supportive community.

It’s important for individuals with factor XIII deficiency to consult with medical professionals for proper diagnosis, treatment, and management of the condition. Testing for factor XIII deficiency typically involves measuring factor XIII activity and identifying any mutations in the F13A1 and F13B genes.

Research on factor XIII deficiency is ongoing, with scientists aiming to better understand the genetic causes, frequency, and associated diseases of this condition. By studying factor XIII deficiency, researchers hope to develop more effective treatments and improve the quality of life for affected individuals.

References:

  1. “Factor XIII Deficiency”. NIH Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center. Retrieved from: https://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/diseases/6737/factor-xiii-deficiency.
  2. “Factor XIII deficiency”. Genetics Home Reference. Retrieved from: https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/factor-xiii-deficiency.

Genes associated with factor XIII deficiency
Gene Alternate Names
F13A1
F13B

References

  • Associated Genetic Testing: For information about genetic testing options, visit the Factor XIII Deficiency page on the Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) website.

  • PubMed: You can find additional articles and research on Factor XIII deficiency by searching the PubMed database.

  • Advocacy and Support: There are organizations that provide advocacy and support for individuals and families affected by Factor XIII deficiency. These include the World Federation of Hemophilia and local hemophilia chapters.

  • Inheritance: Learn more about the inheritance pattern of Factor XIII deficiency through the resources available on the GARD website.

  • Factor XIII Gene: The gene responsible for Factor XIII deficiency is called F13A1. Mutations in this gene can cause different forms of the condition.

  • OMIM: The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database provides in-depth information about the genes and genetic disorders, including Factor XIII deficiency.

  • Frequency: Find information on the frequency of Factor XIII deficiency in different populations through the GARD website.

  • Catalog on Rare Diseases: The Orphanet database provides a catalog of rare diseases, including Factor XIII deficiency.

  • Additional Resources: The GARD website offers a list of additional resources for those seeking more information about Factor XIII deficiency.

  • Acquired Form: In addition to the genetic forms, there is also an acquired form of Factor XIII deficiency that can result from immune system disorders or other conditions. Further information about this form can be found on the GARD website.

  • Diagnosis: The diagnosis of Factor XIII deficiency involves blood tests to measure Factor XIII levels. Genetic testing can also be performed to identify specific mutations in the F13A1 gene.

  • Causes: Factor XIII deficiency is caused by mutations in the F13A1 gene, which is responsible for producing Factor XIII in the bloodstream.

  • ClinicalTrials.gov: ClinicalTrials.gov is a valuable resource for finding ongoing clinical trials and research studies related to Factor XIII deficiency.

  • Affected and Carrier Genes: In addition to the F13A1 gene, there are other genes that can be affected in Factor XIII deficiency, including F13B. Some genes may act as carriers that affect the production or function of Factor XIII.

  • Forms of Factor XIII Deficiency: Factor XIII deficiency can manifest in different forms, including complete deficiency, partial deficiency, or a carrier state. Each form is characterized by different levels of Factor XIII activity.

  • Copies of the Gene: Individuals inherit two copies of the F13A1 gene, one from each parent. Mutations in one or both copies can lead to Factor XIII deficiency.

  • Scientific Studies: Researchers continue to investigate Factor XIII deficiency through scientific studies to better understand the cause, diagnosis, and treatment options for this rare condition.

  • Blood Coagulation: Factor XIII plays a crucial role in the blood coagulation process, and its deficiency can lead to abnormal bleeding and poor wound healing.

  • Injury and Other Conditions: Individuals with Factor XIII deficiency may experience increased bleeding and delayed wound healing following injury or surgery. They may also be at an increased risk for pregnancy-related complications.