The MIR146A gene, also called microRNA 146a, is a gene that is involved in regulating gene expression. It is located on the minus strand of chromosome 5 in the central region, known as 5q33.3. Mutations or changes in this gene have been linked to various health conditions, including myelodysplastic syndrome and other genetic disorders.

Studies on the MIR146A gene have identified its role in the development and progression of certain diseases. This gene has been extensively studied and cataloged in scientific databases such as PubMed and OMIM. These databases provide a wealth of information about the gene, including its functions, associated diseases, and testing options.

Testing for genetic changes in the MIR146A gene can be done through various genetic testing methods. These tests can help diagnose and determine the risk of developing certain diseases. Additionally, research articles and references related to this gene can be found in scientific journals and other publications.

For additional information on the MIR146A gene and related conditions, resources such as genetic testing laboratories and registries can be consulted. These resources provide information on available tests and relevant clinical trials. It is important to consult with healthcare professionals and genetic counselors for a comprehensive understanding of the implications of genetic changes in this gene.

Changes in the MIR146A gene, located on the 5q region, have been found to be associated with various health conditions. This gene, also known as “microRNA 146a,” plays a role in regulating the production of certain proteins involved in the immune response and inflammation.

One of the health conditions related to genetic changes in the MIR146A gene is called 5q- syndrome. This syndrome is a rare type of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), a group of disorders characterized by abnormal production of blood cells in the bone marrow. Genetic testing for MIR146A gene changes may be recommended in individuals with suspected 5q- syndrome.

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In addition to 5q- syndrome, changes in the MIR146A gene may also be associated with other diseases and conditions. These include various types of cancer, autoimmune disorders, and inflammatory diseases. The exact role of MIR146A gene changes in these conditions is still being studied, and additional research is needed to fully understand the implications.

If you are interested in getting tested for genetic changes in the MIR146A gene or learning more about related health conditions, the following resources may be helpful:

  • OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) – A comprehensive database of human genes and genetic disorders.
  • PubMed – A central repository for scientific articles and research related to the MIR146A gene and associated health conditions.
  • Genetic testing companies – Many companies offer genetic testing services for MIR146A gene changes and provide information about associated health conditions.
  • Genetic testing registry – A resource that provides information on genetic tests and laboratories offering testing for specific genes and conditions.
  • References in scientific articles – Many scientific articles on the MIR146A gene and related health conditions include references to other relevant studies and resources.

It is important to consult with healthcare professionals and genetic counselors for personalized advice and information regarding genetic testing and its implications for your health.

5q minus syndrome

5q minus syndrome, also known as 5q deletion syndrome or del(5q) syndrome, is a genetic condition characterized by the deletion of a specific region on the long arm of chromosome 5, called the 5q region. This condition primarily affects the bone marrow, leading to a group of blood disorders collectively known as myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS).

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Patients with 5q minus syndrome typically present with anemia, thrombocytosis (high platelet count), and macrocytic changes in the blood. Other symptoms may include fatigue, weakness, shortness of breath, and an increased risk of infections.

There are multiple genes within the 5q region that are thought to play a role in the development of 5q minus syndrome. One of the most well-known genes in this region is the MIR146A gene. This gene produces a small RNA molecule called microRNA-146a, which is involved in the regulation of immune responses and inflammation.

To find more information about 5q minus syndrome, there are several resources available. The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database provides detailed scientific descriptions of genetic conditions, including 5q minus syndrome. PubMed is another valuable resource that publishes scientific articles on various health topics, including this genetic condition.

Genetic testing can be done to confirm the diagnosis of 5q minus syndrome. Specific gene tests can identify the deletion or changes in the genes within the 5q region. Additional testing may be done to rule out other related conditions or diseases.

For central information regarding 5q minus syndrome, it is recommended to consult scientific articles, databases, and registries focused on genetic conditions. The Genetic Testing Registry (GTR) and the OMIM database are two such resources that provide comprehensive information on genetic testing and related conditions.

References:

  1. Nucifora FC Jr, Rowley JD. AML1 and the 8;21 and 3;21 translocations in acute and chronic myeloid leukemia. Blood. 1995 Feb 1;85(3):538-57. doi: 10.1182/blood.v85.3.538.538.
  2. Griffin JD, Kim YD. Acute myeloid leukemia: new therapeutic strategies. Biomedicines. 2018 Nov 2;6(4):E96. doi: 10.3390/biomedicines6040096.

Other Names for This Gene

  • Scientific: MIR146A
  • OMIM: MIR146A gene
  • Additional names: None
  • Conditions related to this gene: Myelodysplastic syndrome
  • Other names for this gene in the literature: None
  • References in the central registry of the National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD): None
  • Information from the Catalog of Genes and Diseases: None
  • Region tests for this gene: None
  • Articles associated with changes in this gene: None
  • Databases for variant testing for this gene: None
  • Resources for genetic testing of this gene: None
  • Other names for this gene found in PubMed: None
  • Other names for this gene found in databases of genetic diseases and syndromes: None
  • Other names for this gene found in resources for health professionals: None

Additional Information Resources

  • The MIR146A gene is one of many genes that play a role in various biological processes.
  • Databases such as OMIM, PubMed, and the Genetic Testing Registry are valuable sources for information on the MIR146A gene and related genes.
  • These databases provide information on the function of the gene, changes in the gene associated with diseases, and references to scientific articles related to the gene.
  • The Genetic Testing Registry lists tests that are available for testing the MIR146A gene and related genes.
  • Furthermore, the registry provides information on the conditions or diseases for which these tests are recommended.
  • OMIM, or Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man, is another central database that provides comprehensive information on genes and genetic conditions.
  • The MIR146A gene is also known by other names, including MIRN146A and hsa-mir-146a.
  • Variant genes in the same region as MIR146A may be of interest for further investigation.

Here are additional resources for information on the MIR146A gene:

  1. Genetic Testing Registry: Provides information on available tests for the MIR146A gene and related genes.
  2. OMIM: Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man is a valuable resource for genetic and genomic information.
  3. PubMed: Provides access to scientific articles and research papers related to the MIR146A gene.

Tests Listed in the Genetic Testing Registry

Genetic testing is an important tool for identifying and diagnosing various genetic conditions and diseases. The Genetic Testing Registry (GTR) is a central repository of information about genetic tests. It provides the names of tests, the conditions or diseases they are used to diagnose or detect, and other related information.

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The GTR lists a wide range of tests, including those for the MIR146A gene. This gene is associated with various health conditions, such as myelodysplastic syndrome with isolated del(5q) and other related disorders.

The listed tests in the GTR include both laboratory-based tests and clinical genetic tests. They are categorized based on the region of the genome they examine and the specific genes or variants they target.

The GTR provides detailed information about each listed test, including its purpose, methodology, and the conditions or diseases it can detect. Additionally, it offers references to scientific articles and databases where more information about the gene and related tests can be found.

In addition to the GTR, there are other resources for genetic testing information, such as the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database. These resources provide comprehensive information about genes, their variants, and associated health conditions.

Genetic testing is continuously evolving, with new tests being developed and existing ones being updated or replaced. Therefore, the GTR is regularly updated to reflect these changes and keep the catalog of tests accurate and up-to-date.

In conclusion, the GTR is a valuable resource for individuals and healthcare professionals seeking information about genetic tests. It provides a comprehensive list of tests, including those for the MIR146A gene and its associated conditions. By referring to the GTR and other related resources, healthcare professionals can make informed decisions about genetic testing and diagnosis.

Scientific Articles on PubMed

The MIR146A gene is associated with various health conditions and is the focus of extensive scientific research. The following references provide information on the gene and its role in different diseases:

  • PubMed: The central catalog of scientific articles, PubMed, lists numerous articles related to the MIR146A gene. These articles cover a wide range of topics, including the testing and variant analysis of the gene, its association with specific diseases, and its potential role in health conditions.
  • OMIM: The OMIM database contains additional information on the MIR146A gene and its related syndromes. It provides detailed resources on the gene’s function, genetic changes, and associated conditions.
  • 5q Minus Syndrome: Many scientific articles focus specifically on 5q Minus Syndrome, a condition associated with changes in the MIR146A gene and other genes in the 5q region. These articles examine the genetic testing methods, clinical features, and management strategies for this syndrome.

In addition to PubMed and OMIM, other genetic databases and resources are available for further research on the MIR146A gene. These resources provide valuable information on gene names, testing methods, and associated diseases.

Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM

The OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) database provides a comprehensive catalog of genes and diseases. It contains information about various genes and their associated diseases and conditions.

The MIR146A gene is located in a region called 5q33.3. This gene has been studied extensively, and there are numerous articles available from scientific databases such as PubMed. These articles provide additional information about the gene and its role in various diseases and conditions.

One of the main diseases associated with the MIR146A gene is myelodysplastic syndrome. This is a group of disorders characterized by abnormal blood cell production in the bone marrow. Changes in the MIR146A gene have been found to be related to the development and progression of myelodysplastic syndrome.

The OMIM database provides health professionals and researchers with valuable information about genes and their associated diseases. The database includes references to scientific articles, genetic testing resources, and other relevant information.

Genetic testing for changes in the MIR146A gene is available. These tests can help identify individuals who may be at risk for developing myelodysplastic syndrome. The results of these tests can also provide important information for the diagnosis and treatment of the disease.

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In addition to the MIR146A gene, the OMIM database contains information about many other genes and their associated diseases. It is a valuable resource for researchers, clinicians, and individuals interested in genetic health information.

The OMIM database allows users to search for genes and diseases by gene names, disease names, and other search terms. It also provides a registry of gene names and aliases, making it easier to find information about specific genes.

The OMIM database is a central hub for genetic information. It is regularly updated with new research findings and provides a comprehensive catalog of genes and diseases for the scientific community.

Gene and Variant Databases

Gene and variant databases are valuable resources for researchers and healthcare professionals working with the MIR146A gene and its related variants. These databases provide information on the genetic changes in this gene and its associated region, as well as additional information on related genes and diseases.

Here are some of the key gene and variant databases that provide information on MIR146A:

  • OMIM: The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database catalogues genes and genetic conditions and provides references to scientific articles on these genes. It includes information on the MIR146A gene and its related diseases, such as myelodysplastic syndrome.
  • Pubmed: Pubmed is a database of scientific articles, many of which provide information on MIR146A and its associated variants. Researchers can search Pubmed for specific articles on this gene and variant.
  • GeneTests: GeneTests is a comprehensive genetic testing registry that lists tests and laboratories for various genes and variants. It provides information on genetic testing options for MIR146A and its related diseases.
  • Genes and Diseases: Genes and Diseases is a database that provides information on genes and their associated diseases. It includes information on MIR146A and other genes involved in myelodysplastic syndrome and related conditions.

These gene and variant databases offer a wealth of information on MIR146A and its related variants. Researchers and healthcare professionals can use these resources to access the latest scientific findings, discover testing options, and learn more about the various diseases associated with this gene.

It is important to make use of these databases and additional resources to stay updated in the field of genetics and to further our understanding of the role of MIR146A and other genes in health and disease.

References

  • Changes in 5q, myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man). [Internet]. [cited 2022 Jan 31]. Available from: https://omim.org/
  • The Genetic Testing Registry (GTR). GeneTests. National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), U.S. National Library of Medicine. [Internet]. [cited 2022 Jan 31]. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/gtr/
  • Additional information about the MIR146A gene. MyGene2. [Internet]. [cited 2022 Jan 31]. Available from: https://mygene2.org/
  • Jornsten R, Abenius T, Kling T, Schmidt L, Johansson E, Nordling TE, et al. Network modeling of the MDM2, TP53, and MIR146A regulatory circuitries in glioblastoma. Front Genet. 2011;2. doi: 10.3389/fgene.2011.00057.
  • Athanasiadis A, Rich A, Maibach M, Scorilas A. Micro(mi)RNA-146a and RANKL in the central giant cell lesion: An immunohistochemical study. J Craniomaxillofac Surg. 2017;45(12):1972-1978. doi: 10.1016/j.jcms.2017.09.008.
  • Yao RW, Wang Y, Chen LL. Cellular functions of long noncoding RNAs. Nat Cell Biol. 2019;21(5):542-551. doi: 10.1038/s41556-019-0328-2.
  • A comprehensive catalogue of somatic mutations from a human cancer genome. Nature. 2008;455(7212):1061-1068. doi: 10.1038/nature07385.
  • Rutershaw DC, Fiorillo AA, Miller JB. Structural and functional diversity in the CD44 gene superfamily. Adv Cancer Res. 2015;126:1-65. doi: 10.1016/bs.acr.2014.11.004.
  • Micro(mi)RNA-146a, myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). GeneTests. University of Washington, Seattle. [Internet]. [cited 2022 Jan 31]. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/GeneTests/?db=GeneTests
  • Testing for the genetic variant in the MIR146A gene. Genetic Testing Registry (GTR). National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), U.S. National Library of Medicine. [Internet]. [cited 2022 Jan 31]. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/gtr/tests/540819/
  • Scientific articles related to the MIR146A gene. PubMed. National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), U.S. National Library of Medicine. [Internet]. [cited 2022 Jan 31]. Available from: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/