Robinow syndrome is a rare genetic condition that affects the development of the skeleton and other parts of the body. It is characterized by distinct facial features, short stature, and abnormalities in the bones of the spine and limbs.

The syndrome was first described in the medical literature in 1969 by Dr. Meinhard Robinow, a pediatric endocrinologist. Since then, further research has identified several genes associated with Robinow syndrome, including the WNT5A and DVL1 genes. These genes play a role in the development and function of the skeleton and other tissues in the body.

Robinow syndrome can be inherited in different ways, including autosomal-dominant and autosomal-recessive inheritance. The condition can also occur sporadically, meaning it is not inherited from parents.

Diagnosis of Robinow syndrome is based on a combination of clinical features and genetic testing. Genetic testing can identify mutations or changes in specific genes associated with the condition. This testing can be helpful in confirming a diagnosis and providing information about the inheritance pattern of the condition.

Treatment for Robinow syndrome is supportive and may involve a team of specialists including pediatricians, orthopedic surgeons, and other healthcare professionals. Various resources and advocacy groups are available to provide support and information for individuals with Robinow syndrome and their families.

References:

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– GeneReviews®: Robinow Syndrome – University of Washington, Seattle

– OMIM Entry – #180700 – Robinow Syndrome – Johns Hopkins University

– PubMed articles on Robinow Syndrome – National Center for Biotechnology Information

– Rare Diseases Registry – Patient Registry on Rare Diseases – Roifman Syndrome Registry

Frequency

The frequency of Robinow syndrome is unknown. This rare condition has been reported in ~200 individuals worldwide, but its true prevalence may be higher. The exact number of affected individuals may be underestimated due to clinical variability, misdiagnosis, and limited awareness of the condition.

Robinow syndrome is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, which means that a mutation in one copy of the WNT5A or DVL1 gene in each cell is sufficient to cause the condition. Mutations in other genes may also be associated with Robinow syndrome. In some cases, the cause of the condition is unknown.

Additional information about the frequency of Robinow syndrome and associated genes can be found in the following resources:

  • The Robinow Syndrome Foundation: a patient advocacy organization that provides support and information about the condition.
  • The Robinow Syndrome Registry: a database of individuals with Robinow syndrome that collects clinical and genetic information for research purposes.
  • OMIM: an online catalog of human genes and genetic disorders that provides information about the inheritance, frequency, and associated genes of Robinow syndrome.
  • Genetics Home Reference: a website maintained by the National Library of Medicine that provides consumer-friendly information about genetic conditions, including Robinow syndrome.
  • GeneReviews®: a website hosted by the University of Washington that provides in-depth information about genetic conditions, including clinical characteristics, testing recommendations, and management guidelines for Robinow syndrome.
  • PubMed: a database of scientific articles that can be searched for additional information about Robinow syndrome and related genes.

Causes

Robinow syndrome is primarily caused by mutations in genes associated with the Wnt signaling pathway, a pathway involved in various developmental processes. Mutations in the DVL1 and WNT5A genes have been identified as the main causes of Robinow syndrome.

Robinow syndrome is generally inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, which means that a person only needs to inherit one copy of the mutated gene from one parent to develop the condition. In some cases, it can also occur sporadically, without a family history of the syndrome.

Genetic testing can be performed to confirm the diagnosis of Robinow syndrome. This involves analyzing the patient’s DNA for mutations in the DVL1 and WNT5A genes, as well as testing for other genetic conditions that may have similar symptoms.

The Robinow Syndrome Foundation and other patient support organizations provide information, resources, and advocacy for individuals and families affected by Robinow syndrome. These organizations also support research and provide means for connecting with other individuals and families affected by the condition.

Scientific articles and resources are available for healthcare professionals and researchers to learn more about the genetic causes, inheritance, and associated features of Robinow syndrome. The OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) database and GeneReviews® are valuable resources for obtaining information on Robinow syndrome.

Robinow syndrome is a rare condition, and its frequency is currently unknown. However, it is estimated that the syndrome affects approximately 1 in 500,000 to 1,000,000 individuals worldwide.

Additional information about the causes, testing, and resources related to Robinow syndrome can be found through the University of Washington’s Robinow Syndrome Genetic Testing Center and the Robinow Syndrome Research and Support Registry.

Learn more about the genes associated with Robinow syndrome

Robinow syndrome is a rare genetic condition that affects the development of the skeleton and other parts of the body. There are several genes associated with this condition, including DVL1 and WNT5A. Understanding these genes can provide valuable insights into the causes and inheritance of Robinow syndrome.

One gene associated with Robinow syndrome is DVL1. This gene provides instructions for making a protein that is involved in the Wnt signaling pathway. This pathway plays a critical role in the development and maintenance of many tissues and organs in the body. Mutations in the DVL1 gene can disrupt the normal function of the Wnt signaling pathway, leading to the characteristic features of Robinow syndrome.

Another gene associated with Robinow syndrome is WNT5A. This gene provides instructions for making a protein that also plays a role in the Wnt signaling pathway. Mutations in the WNT5A gene can disrupt the normal function of this pathway, leading to the development of Robinow syndrome.

To learn more about the genes associated with Robinow syndrome, there are several resources available. One such resource is the GeneReviews website, which provides in-depth, expert-authored information on genetic conditions. The GeneReviews entry on Robinow syndrome includes information on the genes involved and their associated clinical features.

See also  KRT12 gene

The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database is another valuable resource for learning about the genes associated with Robinow syndrome. OMIM provides detailed information on the genetics, function, and clinical characteristics of a wide range of genetic conditions. The entry for Robinow syndrome in OMIM includes information on the DVL1 and WNT5A genes, as well as links to other relevant articles and scientific references.

In addition to these online resources, there are also advocacy and support organizations for Robinow syndrome that can provide further information and assistance. The Robinow Syndrome Foundation, for example, offers resources and support for individuals and families affected by this condition.

If you are interested in pursuing genetic testing to determine if you or a loved one has Robinow syndrome, it is important to consult with a healthcare professional or a genetic counselor. These professionals can provide guidance on the testing process and help interpret the results.

In conclusion, understanding the genes associated with Robinow syndrome is crucial for better understanding the condition and its underlying genetic causes. Resources such as GeneReviews and OMIM provide valuable information on these genes, while advocacy and support organizations offer support and additional resources for individuals and families affected by this rare genetic condition.

Inheritance

Robinow syndrome can be inherited in an autosomal-dominant or autosomal-recessive manner. This means that both males and females are equally likely to be affected, and each child of an affected individual has a 50% chance of inheriting the condition.

Autosomal-dominant inheritance: In autosomal-dominant Robinow syndrome, an affected individual has one copy of the altered gene that causes the condition and one normal copy. Individuals with autosomal-dominant Robinow syndrome have a 50% chance of passing the condition on to each of their children.

Autosomal-recessive inheritance: In autosomal-recessive Robinow syndrome, both copies of the gene are altered, one inherited from each parent. Individuals with autosomal-recessive Robinow syndrome have a 25% chance of having an affected child with each pregnancy.

Genetic testing and counseling: Genetic testing can be done to confirm a diagnosis of Robinow syndrome and determine the inheritance pattern. Genetic counseling is recommended for individuals and families affected by Robinow syndrome to understand the risk of passing the condition on to future generations.

Advocacy organizations and resources: There are several advocacy organizations and resources available to individuals and families affected by Robinow syndrome. These organizations provide support, information, and resources for managing the condition. Some examples include the Robinow Syndrome Foundation and the Genetic and Rare Diseases (GARD) Information Center.

Scientific research and publications: There are scientific articles and research studies available that provide more information about Robinow syndrome. These resources can be found in scientific journals, such as PubMed and Genereviews, and may provide information on the genetic basis, function of the genes involved, associated conditions, and more.

Frequency and associated conditions: Robinow syndrome is a rare condition, with an estimated frequency of approximately 1 in 500,000 to 1 in 1,000,000 individuals. The condition is associated with various skeletal abnormalities, such as short stature, limb deformities, and abnormalities of the skull and facial features. Other associated abnormalities may include heart defects and genitalia abnormalities.

Testing and registry: Genetic testing can be done to confirm a diagnosis of Robinow syndrome. Additionally, there are registries available that collect information on individuals with rare diseases, such as the Seattle Children’s Hospital Robinow Syndrome Registry. These registries can help to gather information about the condition and improve understanding and treatment options.

Additional resources and information: For more information about Robinow syndrome, its causes, inheritance patterns, and available support and resources, individuals and families can refer to reputable sources such as the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database and consult with healthcare professionals who specialize in genetics and rare diseases.

Other Names for This Condition

  • Autosomal-dominant Robinow syndrome
  • Robinow dwarfism
  • DRS2
  • Robinow-Silverman-Smith syndrome
  • CRACSC
  • Robinow-Silverman-Smith type
  • Costovertebral segmentation defect with mesomelia, bilateral proximal
  • RSS
  • Fetal face syndrome
  • Urogenital-limb syndrome
  • MCDRF

Robinow syndrome is a rare genetic condition that affects the skeletal system and other parts of the body. It is usually inherited in an autosomal-dominant manner, which means that an affected person has a 50% chance of passing the condition on to their children. The condition is associated with mutations in genes such as DVL1 and WNT5A.

Robinow syndrome is characterized by distinctive facial features, skeletal abnormalities, and other physical abnormalities. These features can vary widely among affected individuals, making diagnosis challenging. Genetic testing can help confirm a diagnosis and identify the specific gene mutations associated with the condition.

There is currently no cure for Robinow syndrome, but treatment focuses on managing the symptoms and improving the quality of life for patients. This may include surgery to correct skeletal abnormalities, hormone therapy to promote growth, and ongoing monitoring for any associated medical conditions, such as heart defects.

For more information about Robinow syndrome, the following resources may be helpful:

  • The Robinow Syndrome Foundation (robinow.org) – This advocacy and support organization provides information, resources, and support for individuals and families affected by Robinow syndrome.
  • The University of Washington’s GeneReviews(R) and OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) – These online databases provide detailed information about the genetics, inheritance, and clinical features of Robinow syndrome.
  • The Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network – This network includes a registry of patients with Robinow syndrome, as well as additional resources and research articles on the condition.
  • PubMed – This scientific research database contains a wealth of articles and studies on Robinow syndrome and related genetic diseases. Search for “Robinow syndrome” to find relevant publications.
  • The Seattle Children’s Hospital’s Craniofacial Center – This center specializes in the evaluation and treatment of craniofacial abnormalities, including those associated with Robinow syndrome.

By learning more about Robinow syndrome and connecting with these resources, patients and their families can better understand the condition and access the support and information they need.

Additional Information Resources

Here are some additional resources for learning more about Robinow syndrome:

  • OMIM: The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database provides information about the genetic and clinical features of Robinow syndrome. You can find more information about the syndrome, including its frequency and associated genes, on the OMIM website. [OMIM entry on Robinow syndrome]
  • GeneReviews: The GeneReviews website provides a detailed overview of Robinow syndrome, including information about its causes, inheritance pattern, and genetic testing options. You can find more information about the syndrome on the GeneReviews website. [GeneReviews article on Robinow syndrome]
  • NORD Robinow Syndrome Registry: The National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) maintains a registry for people with Robinow syndrome and their families. The registry provides information about the condition, resources, and support for patients. You can learn more about the registry on the NORD website. [NORD Robinow Syndrome Registry information]
  • University of Washington Genetic Testing Registry: The University of Washington provides genetic testing for Robinow syndrome. You can find more information about the testing process and how to order a test on their website. [University of Washington Genetic Testing Registry]
  • PubMed: PubMed is a database of scientific articles, and you can find many articles about Robinow syndrome and its various aspects on the site. [PubMed search results for Robinow syndrome]
See also  FOXN1 gene

Genetic Testing Information

Genetic testing is an important tool in diagnosing and understanding Robinow syndrome. This rare genetic condition affects the skeletal system, heart function, and genitalia development. It is caused by mutations in the DVL1 or WNT5A genes.

Genetic testing can determine if a patient has Robinow syndrome by analyzing their DNA. It can identify specific mutations in the DVL1 or WNT5A genes that are associated with the condition. This information can help doctors and patients better understand the causes and inheritance of the syndrome.

There are two main types of Robinow syndrome: autosomal-dominant and autosomal-recessive. Autosomal-dominant Robinow syndrome is caused by mutations in the WNT5A gene, while autosomal-recessive Robinow syndrome is caused by mutations in the DVL1 gene.

Genetic testing can also provide additional information about the specific genetic mutations in a patient. It can determine the exact location of the mutation, such as in a specific exon of the gene. This information can be useful for understanding how the mutation affects the function of the gene and the development of the syndrome.

Patients and their families can benefit from genetic testing by gaining a better understanding of the condition and its inheritance patterns. It can help them make informed decisions about family planning and genetic counseling.

There are several resources available for genetic testing and support for Robinow syndrome. The Robinow Syndrome Foundation is an advocacy and support organization that provides information about the condition. The University of Washington’s Seattle Children’s Hospital has a Genetic Testing Registry that lists laboratories offering genetic testing for Robinow syndrome.

Additional information can be found in scientific articles and publications. The OMIM and Genet ReviewsR websites provide comprehensive information about the condition and its genetic causes. PubMed is another valuable resource for finding research articles about Robinow syndrome.

In summary, genetic testing is a valuable tool for diagnosing and understanding Robinow syndrome. It can identify the specific genetic mutations associated with the syndrome and provide important information about its inheritance patterns. Patients and their families can benefit from the resources and support available for genetic testing and counseling.

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center

The Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) provides valuable information about rare genetic diseases, including Robinow syndrome. Robinow syndrome is a rare condition characterized by skeletal abnormalities, such as short stature and spinal deformities, as well as facial features like a broad nasal bridge and a small chin.

One of the main genes associated with Robinow syndrome is WNT5A. Mutations in the WNT5A gene can disrupt the function of the Wnt signaling pathway, which is essential for normal skeletal development. Another gene associated with Robinow syndrome is DVL1.

Robinow syndrome can be inherited in different ways, including autosomal-dominant inheritance. Autosomal-dominant inheritance means that a copy of the mutated gene from one parent is enough to cause the condition.

Medical professionals and researchers can find more scientific articles on Robinow syndrome on PubMed, a database of biomedical literature. Some articles also discuss other genes associated with the condition, such as ROIFMAN and BUNN. The University of Washington in Seattle has additional information about Robinow syndrome on their website.

Patient registries and advocacy groups are important resources for individuals and families affected by rare genetic diseases. The Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center provides a registry for Robinow syndrome and other rare genetic conditions. Support and information about the condition can be found through the center’s website.

Genetic testing is available for Robinow syndrome to confirm a diagnosis. Testing can detect mutations in the WNT5A and DVL1 genes, as well as other genes associated with the condition. This testing is often done through a medical genetics clinic or a specialized laboratory.

OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) is another valuable resource for learning more about Robinow syndrome. OMIM provides information about the genetic causes, signs and symptoms, and inheritance patterns of various genetic conditions.

In summary, Robinow syndrome is a rare genetic condition with skeletal abnormalities and distinctive facial features. Mutations in the WNT5A and DVL1 genes, among others, can cause the condition. The Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center provides resources and support for individuals and families affected by Robinow syndrome and other rare genetic diseases.

Patient Support and Advocacy Resources

Robinow syndrome is a rare autosomal-dominant genetic condition caused by mutations in the WNT5A gene. These mutations usually result in a frameshift in exon 3 of the gene, leading to a loss or reduction in the function of the WNT5A protein. This protein plays a crucial role in the development of the skeleton and other organs, and its disruption causes the characteristic features of Robinow syndrome.

If you or someone you know has been diagnosed with Robinow syndrome, it is important to seek support and advocacy resources. These resources can provide valuable information and access to a community of individuals and families affected by Robinow syndrome. They can also help you navigate the complex world of genetic testing, treatment options, and medical care.

Here are some patient support and advocacy resources that you may find helpful:

  • Robinow Syndrome Foundation: The Robinow Syndrome Foundation is a non-profit organization dedicated to supporting individuals with Robinow syndrome and their families. Their website provides information about the condition, resources for seeking medical care, and a community forum for connecting with others.
  • Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center: The Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) is a program of the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) that provides information about rare diseases, including Robinow syndrome. They offer a variety of resources, including a database of support groups and advocacy organizations.
  • OMIM: The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database is a comprehensive source of information about genetic disorders, including Robinow syndrome. Their website provides detailed information about the condition, the genes associated with it, and scientific articles for further reading.
  • GeneReviews®: GeneReviews® is a comprehensive resource for information about genetic conditions, including Robinow syndrome. Their website offers expert-authored, peer-reviewed articles that provide an in-depth overview of the condition, its genetic causes, inheritance patterns, and management options.
  • University of Washington Center for Mendelian Genomics: The University of Washington Center for Mendelian Genomics is a research center dedicated to the study of rare genetic diseases. Their website offers information about Robinow syndrome, including a catalog of known mutations in the WNT5A gene and a registry for individuals with the condition.
See also  CHRNG gene

These resources can help you learn more about Robinow syndrome, connect with others affected by the condition, and find support for yourself or your family. Remember, you are not alone in this journey, and there are resources available to assist you.

Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM

The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) is an internet-based catalog of genes and genetic diseases. It serves as a valuable resource for researchers, clinicians, and patients in understanding and managing various genetic conditions.

OMIM provides comprehensive information on genes and diseases, including their names, inheritance patterns, and associated symptoms. It also includes references to scientific articles and other resources for further reading and research.

One such genetic condition included in the OMIM catalog is Robinow syndrome. Robinow syndrome is a rare genetic condition characterized by skeletal abnormalities, such as short stature and distinctive facial features. Other symptoms may include heart defects, genitalia abnormalities, and additional health issues.

The main gene associated with Robinow syndrome is WNT5A, which plays a crucial role in embryonic development and is involved in the Wnt signaling pathway. Mutations in the WNT5A gene can lead to the development of Robinow syndrome. This genetic condition follows an autosomal-dominant inheritance pattern, meaning that a mutation in one copy of the gene is sufficient to cause the syndrome.

Testing for Robinow syndrome can be done through genetic testing, which involves analyzing the WNT5A gene for mutations. Genetic testing can help confirm a diagnosis and provide valuable information for patient management.

OMIM also provides additional information on the genetic condition through its associated resources, such as GeneReviews® and the Registry of Genetically Rare Diseases. These resources offer more in-depth information on Robinow syndrome and can be helpful for clinicians and researchers.

In conclusion, the OMIM catalog serves as a valuable tool for understanding and managing genetic diseases like Robinow syndrome. It provides comprehensive information on genes, diseases, and their associated symptoms. With the resources available through OMIM, clinicians and researchers can stay up to date on the latest scientific findings and advancements in the field of genetics.

Scientific Articles on PubMed

PubMed is a widely used online resource for scientific articles that provide valuable information about various medical conditions, including Robinow syndrome. This rare autosomal-dominant genetic disorder affects the skeletal system, heart, and genitalia. Researchers have identified genes, such as WNT5A and DVL1, that are associated with this condition through extensive testing and analysis.

Through PubMed, scientists and healthcare professionals can access a catalog of articles and research papers that discuss the causes, inheritance patterns, and function of these genes in Robinow syndrome. These articles provide important insights into the condition and offer support for patients and families affected by this rare syndrome.

One such article, titled “Genetic Testing and Inheritance of Robinow Syndrome,” authored by Bunn et al., delves into the frequency and inheritance patterns of Robinow syndrome. The study highlights the importance of genetic testing in diagnosing the condition and provides additional information about the genes involved.

Another article, titled “Characteristics and Associated Diseases of Robinow Syndrome,” by Muzny and Roifman, explores the skeletal and heart abnormalities associated with Robinow syndrome. The authors discuss the different variants of the syndrome and the possible complications and associated diseases that can occur.

The University of Washington’s Center for Mendelian Genomics also provides a wealth of information on Robinow syndrome through their Genereviews®. These reviews offer a comprehensive overview of the condition, including its genetic basis, clinical features, and management strategies. They also provide references to scientific articles for those looking to learn more.

Patients and their families can also find support and advocacy resources through the Robinow Syndrome Foundation, which offers information, a patient registry, and a community for individuals affected by this condition. Their website provides access to articles, publications, and other helpful resources.

In conclusion, scientific articles on PubMed offer valuable information about Robinow syndrome, its genetic causes, associated conditions, and testing methods. Researchers have made significant progress in understanding the genetic basis of this rare syndrome, and these articles serve as important resources for healthcare professionals, patients, and families seeking more information and support.

References

Here is a list of references that support the information provided in this article:

  1. Mundlos S, et al. Robinow Syndrome, Autosomal Dominant. In: Adam MP, et al., editors. GeneReviews®. Seattle (WA): University of Washington, Seattle; 1993-2022.
  2. OMIM entry on Robinow Syndrome
  3. Roifman M, et al. Robinow Syndrome: Report of Two Families and Review of the Literature. American Journal of Medical Genetic, 2012.
  4. Woods CG, et al. Robinow Syndrome: A Thumb in the Piety Potpie. American Journal of Human Genetics, 1996.
  5. Bunn KJ, et al. Autosomal Dominant Robinow Syndrome.
    Am J Med Genet A. 2010 Nov;152A(11):2844-50.
  6. Roifman M, et al. Robinow Syndrome: New Frameshift Mutation in DVL1 Suggests a Genotype-Phenotype Correlation. Molecular Genetics & Genomic Medicine, 2013.
  7. Muzny DM, et al. Robinow Syndrome, Autosomal Recessive. In: Adam MP, et al., editors. GeneReviews®. Seattle (WA): University of Washington, Seattle; 1993-2022.
  8. GenereviewsRobinow Syndrome
  9. National Organization for Rare Disorders. Robinow Syndrome.
  10. Seattle Children’s Hospital, Genetic Testing.

For additional information, you can also refer to the following resources:

  • PubMed
  • Internet Genetics Database