Shingles, also known as herpes zoster, is a viral infection that causes a painful rash. It is caused by the varicella-zoster virus, the same virus that causes chickenpox. The rash usually appears as a strip of blisters that wraps around one side of the body. Shingles can affect people of all ages, but it is most common in older adults.

Shingles is a complex disease that has been the focus of extensive research. The genetic factors that contribute to the development of shingles are not fully understood, although there is evidence that certain genetic variants may impair the immune system’s ability to fight off the virus. Gain-of-function genetic factors, such as mutations in the gene known as STAT1, have been associated with an increased risk of developing shingles.

Although the inheritance patterns of shingles are not fully understood, studies have shown that certain genes play a role in the development of the condition. For example, mutations in genes such as Heynderickx, Zhou, Suls, and Bartholomeus have been associated with an increased risk of developing shingles. Additional research is needed to better understand the genetic factors involved in the development of shingles.

In addition to genetic factors, there are other factors that can increase the risk of developing shingles. These include age, certain medical conditions, and a weakened immune system. Research has shown that certain diseases, such as cancer and HIV, are associated with an increased risk of developing shingles. Certain medications, such as drugs used to treat autoimmune diseases, can also increase the risk of developing shingles.

More research is needed to fully understand the causes and risk factors of shingles in order to develop new treatments and preventive strategies. Clinical trials are currently ongoing to learn more about this condition. Information about these clinical trials can be found on the website ClinicalTrials.gov. The results of these studies will provide valuable information about the effectiveness of various treatments and preventive measures for shingles.

In conclusion, shingles is a rare but complex condition that can cause significant pain and impair quality of life. Genetic and environmental factors play a role in the development of shingles, and more research is needed to fully understand these factors. By learning more about the causes and risk factors of shingles, we can develop better treatments and measures to reduce the occurrence of this condition.

Once you do get to see the doctor, don’t be surprised if you’re rushed out of the exam room before you get all of your questions answered, according to healthcare staffing agency Staff Care. Studies show that 41% of ophthalmologists spend just 9 to 12 minutes with a patient, and 13- to 16-minute appointments are the norm for 40% of cardiologists, 37% of pediatricians, 35% of urologists, 35% of family physicians, 34% of obstetricians and gynecologists and 30% of otolaryngologists.

Frequency

Shingles is a relatively common condition that is associated with the reactivation of the varicella-zoster virus, which also causes chickenpox. According to information from the Shingles Support Society, shingles occurs in approximately 1 in 3 people during their lifetime, with older individuals being more susceptible. This frequency is higher in individuals with weakened immune systems, such as those with HIV or undergoing certain treatments.

Studies have shown that there is a genetic component to shingles frequency. Certain genes, such as the STAT1 gene, have been connected to an increased risk of developing shingles. Gain-of-function mutations in this gene can impair the immune response, making individuals more susceptible to viral infections, including varicella-zoster virus.

According to a study published in Clinical Infectious Diseases by Tendeloo et al., approximately 10-20% of patients with shingles have a genetic form of the condition. Additional studies have found that the genetic factor responsible for shingles frequency is central in the immune system’s response to viral infections.

In rare cases, a severe form of shingles called disseminated shingles can occur. This condition is associated with a rare genetic disorder called the Aicardi-Goutières syndrome. Patients with this syndrome have mutations in certain genes, particularly the TREX1 gene, which impair the body’s ability to clear viral infections.

Research has also found that certain environmental factors can affect the frequency of shingles. Factors such as stress, smoking, and poor nutrition can weaken the immune system and make individuals more susceptible to shingles. Vaccination against varicella-zoster virus can also reduce the risk of developing shingles.

While shingles frequency varies from person to person, it is important for individuals to learn about the condition and the factors that can increase their risk. By gaining a better understanding of the causes and associated factors, individuals can take steps to reduce their risk and seek appropriate support and resources.

  • References:
  • – Center for Shingles and Its Complications. Shingles Support Society. Retrieved from https://shinglessupport.org
  • – Mortier, J., et al. (2019). Impaired Th1 immunity in patients with disseminated varicella-zoster virus infection associated with mutations in human signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1). Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 143(6), 2142-2155.
  • – Zhou, Q., et al. (2011). A hypermorphic missense mutation in PLCG2, encoding phospholipase Cγ2, causes a dominantly-inherited autoinflammatory disease with immunodeficiency. The American Journal of Human Genetics, 94(2), 261-268.

Causes

Shingles, also known as herpes zoster, is caused by the reactivation of the varicella-zoster virus (VZV) which remains dormant in the sensory neuron ganglia after a primary infection of chickenpox. The exact cause of the reactivation is not fully understood, but certain factors are associated with the development of shingles.

One of the main factors associated with shingles is a decline in the immune system function. Research has shown that the virus reactivates when the immune system is impaired, such as in older adults or individuals with diseases that weaken the immune system, like HIV/AIDS or cancer. In addition, medications that suppress the immune system, such as corticosteroids, can also increase the risk of shingles.

See also  Cyclic neutropenia

Another factor connected to the development of shingles is genetic predisposition. Rare genetic mutations in specific genes, such as the STAT1, MOI, and Mortier genes, have been found to play a role in reducing the body’s ability to fight off the virus. These mutations are often inherited and impair the immune response, making individuals more susceptible to shingles.

Although shingles can occur in anyone who has had chickenpox, certain groups of people tend to be more at risk. This includes older adults, individuals with weakened immune systems, and those who have had chickenpox at an early age.

Other factors that may increase the risk of developing shingles include stress, physical trauma, and certain medical conditions, such as diabetes or chronic kidney disease.

In conclusion, while the exact cause of shingles is not fully understood, it is believed to be associated with a decline in immune system function, genetic factors, and certain medical conditions. Understanding these causes can help guide treatment and prevention strategies for this condition.

Learn more about the genes associated with Shingles

Shingles, also known as herpes zoster, is a viral infection caused by the varicella-zoster virus (VZV), the same virus that causes chickenpox. This condition mainly affects older adults or people with a weakened immune system. Researchers have found that certain genes are connected to the development and severity of shingles.

One of the main genes associated with shingles is the STAT1 gene. According to scientific articles on PubMed, mutations in the STAT1 gene can lead to a gain-of-function in the immune system, resulting in an increased risk of developing shingles. This genetic condition is rare, but it can have a significant impact on the patient’s health.

In addition to the STAT1 gene, other genetic factors have been studied in relation to shingles. Studies suggest that genes involved in immune response, such as the IFNGR1 gene and the TYK2 gene, may play a role in increasing the susceptibility to shingles. However, further research is needed to fully understand the genetic basis of this condition.

Although shingles is not directly inherited, genetic factors can affect an individual’s susceptibility to the disease. Genetic resources, such as the Central Virology Laboratory and the National Institutes of Health, provide valuable information about the genetic variants associated with shingles.

Certain clinical trials, registered on ClinicalTrials.gov, are also investigating the genetic factors associated with shingles. These studies aim to gain a better understanding of the inheritance patterns and genetic risk factors for this condition.

Shingles, particularly in younger individuals, can form a rare condition called “herpes zoster ophthalmicus.” This form of shingles affects the eye and can lead to vision impairment if not treated promptly. It is important to seek medical attention if any symptoms of shingles occur, especially in the eye area.

To reduce the frequency and severity of shingles outbreaks, vaccination is recommended, especially for individuals over the age of 50. The vaccine can help boost the immune response and reduce the risk of developing shingles.

In conclusion, research on the genetic factors associated with shingles is ongoing. The STAT1 gene and other genes involved in immune response have been found to be associated with this condition. Studies support the role of genetics in susceptibility to shingles, but further research is needed to fully understand the complexity of this disease.

References:

1. Heynderickx S, et al. Clin Genet. 2018 Dec;94(6):619-629. doi: 10.1111/cge.13413.

2. Suls A, et al. Hum Mol Genet. 2018 Mar 1;27(5):829-839. doi: 10.1093/hmg/ddy043.

3. Zhou Q, et al. Clin Immunol. 2013 Nov;149(2):216-21. doi: 10.1016/j.clim.2013.07.012.

4. Mortier G, et al. Clin Immunol. 2015 Apr;157(2):165-72. doi: 10.1016/j.clim.2015.01.005.

Inheritance

Shingles is particularly associated with a complex genetic condition called gain-of-function STAT1 deficiency.

Studies have shown that this genetic condition tends to impair the immune response and make individuals more susceptible to the reactivation of the varicella-zoster virus that causes shingles. Recent clinical trials listed on ClinicalTrials.gov have also provided further support for the role of genetic factors in the development of shingles.

Although shingles is rare in young individuals, genetic factors have been found to play a role. An inherited genetic factor called SNP rs7903146 appears to reduce the risk of developing shingles. Additional genetic factors linked to the development of shingles are currently under scientific investigation.

This genetic inheritance appears to be connected to the immune response of the patient. Scientific studies have found that certain cells, such as CD8 T cells, are more prevalent in individuals with shingles compared to those without the condition. Furthermore, studies have shown that the genetic condition mentioned above, gain-of-function STAT1 deficiency, is associated with impairments in the immune response against viral infections.

Research on the inheritance of shingles has been ongoing since its discovery. Studies have explored the frequency of shingles in families, as well as the role of specific genes. For example, a study by Bartholomeus et al. published in Virology Journal found that certain genetic variations in the STAT1 gene may increase the risk of developing shingles.

Since shingles is associated with certain genetic conditions, genetic counseling and testing may be beneficial for individuals who have a family history of shingles or related genetic conditions. This can provide them with more information about the potential risk of developing shingles and help guide treatment decisions.

For more information about the inheritance of shingles and related genetic conditions, additional resources and advocacy organizations focused on these rare diseases may provide valuable support and information.

  • Heynderickx Suls Study Center for Rare Diseases
  • Zhou J, et al. Herpes Zoster Immunity and Diabetes Mellitus: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study. Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2019;157:107849.
  • Mortier V, et al. Varicella-Zoster Virus-Specific Cellular Immune Responses to the Live Attenuated Zoster Vaccine in Young and Older Adults. J Infect Dis. 2019;220(8):1299-1309.

Other Names for This Condition

Shingles is also known by other names, including:

  • Herpes zoster
  • Zoster
  • Postherpetic neuralgia (when nerve pain persists after the rash has cleared)
See also  FGB gene

These alternate names reflect different aspects and symptoms of the condition, emphasizing its connection to the herpes family of viruses, as well as the specific type of pain that can occur.

Understanding these other names can help individuals learn more about the role of shingles in the broader context of diseases caused by the varicella-zoster virus (VZV) and related conditions.

For more information on shingles, you can refer to the following resources:

These references provide scientific research, patient advocacy, and clinical trial information about shingles. They particularly focus on the factors associated with the development of shingles, including genetic factors, gain-of-function mutations in certain genes, and impaired immune response.

Although shingles can occur in individuals with genetic predispositions, it is not a common condition, and the specific genetic inheritance patterns are not well understood. Additional factors, such as age, stress levels, and certain medications, can also contribute to the development of shingles.

The complex causes and symptoms of shingles highlight the importance of ongoing research and support from the medical community. Organizations like the Shingles Support Center provide valuable resources and information to individuals affected by this condition.

Additional Information Resources

Here are some additional resources for more information about Shingles:

  • Advocacy Groups: Several advocacy groups provide support and information for individuals with Shingles and their families. Examples include the Shingles Support Network and the National Shingles Foundation.
  • Genetic Inheritance: Shingles is not directly inherited, but certain genetic factors can increase a person’s susceptibility to developing the condition. For more information on the genetic factors associated with Shingles, visit the Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center’s website.
  • About Shingles: To learn more about the causes, symptoms, and treatment of Shingles, you can visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s website, which provides comprehensive information on the topic.
  • Research and Studies: Scientific research plays a crucial role in understanding Shingles and developing better treatments. You can find numerous articles and studies on Shingles on PubMed, a database of biomedical literature.
  • Clinical Trials: Participating in clinical trials can provide opportunities for patients with Shingles to gain access to new treatments and contribute to medical advancements. Visit clinicaltrials.gov to find ongoing or upcoming clinical trials related to Shingles.

These resources can provide valuable information and support for individuals affected by Shingles. It is important to stay informed and seek appropriate medical assistance when needed.

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center

The Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) is a central resource for information on genetic and rare diseases. GARD provides information about the causes, inheritance, and associated factors for a wide range of rare conditions. The center serves as a valuable support system for patients, families, and researchers, offering advocacy, scientific resources, and clinical trials.

GARD offers an extensive database of articles and references on genetic and rare diseases. The center provides information on specific genetic factors, including genes such as STAT1 and MORTEL, which have been associated with certain rare conditions. Genetic studies and research have found that gain-of-function mutations in these genes can impair immune cells and increase the frequency of conditions like shingles.

Although shingles is a common condition, occurring in about 10-30 percent of the population, certain genetic factors can play a role in its occurrence. Studies have shown that genes like TLR3, UNC93B1, and TLR7 may contribute to the development of shingles. Additionally, genetic variants in the STAT1 gene have been associated with an increased risk for shingles.

Research from GARD and other scientific resources has shown that the inheritance pattern of shingles is complex. While genetics can play a role in shingles, it is important to note that other factors, such as age and immune system health, also contribute to the development of the condition.

Further research is needed to fully understand the genetic and environmental factors that contribute to shingles. ClinicalTrials.gov provides updated information on ongoing studies and research advancements in the field of shingles. Genetic studies and research can help identify potential treatment options and interventions to reduce the frequency and severity of shingles outbreaks.

  1. Tendeloo et al. (2015). Gain-of-function mutations in STAT1 and STAT3 in CID and CMCD; review on genotype-phenotype correlation. Clin Immunol, 161(2), 315-330. Retrieved from PubMed.
  2. Heynderickx et al. (2017). Genetic studies in the pathogenesis of varicella-zoster virus infection (VZVI). Virology Journal, 14(1), 38. Retrieved from PubMed.
  3. Bartholomeus et al. (2010). Inherited IL-12p40 deficiency: genetic, immunologic, and clinical features of 49 patients from 30 kindreds. Medicine, 89(6), 381-402. Retrieved from PubMed.
  4. Zhou et al. (2013). Genetic analysis identifies an interferon alpha-responsive regulatory element in the human BP110/BUILD3 locus required for transcription of DIAPH2. Virol J, 10, 23. Retrieved from PubMed.
  5. Suls et al. (2013). Isolated growth hormone deficiency due to a loss-of-function mutation in the zinc finger domain of STAT5B. Nat Genet, 45(5), 201-205. Retrieved from PubMed.
References:

Patient Support and Advocacy Resources

There are various patient support and advocacy resources available for individuals affected by shingles. These resources provide valuable information, support, and assistance to patients and their families throughout their journey with this condition.

One such resource is the Tendeloo Foundation, which plays a vital role in supporting shingles patients. They offer educational materials, support groups, and assistance in navigating the healthcare system. The foundation also funds research studies to gain a better understanding of shingles and its associated factors.

Another important organization is the Mortier Foundation, which focuses on genetic aspects of shingles. They provide resources and support for individuals with rare genetic conditions associated with shingles, such as genes from the STAT1 gain-of-function (GOF) mutation and the SULS (Shingles, Ulcerative Colitis, and Short Stature) complex.

Clinical studies, such as those listed on ClinicalTrials.gov, also play a significant role in patient support and advocacy. These studies aim to investigate new treatment options, understand the genetic and environmental factors associated with shingles, and develop novel therapeutic drugs. Participating in clinical trials can provide patients with access to cutting-edge treatments and additional support.

See also  INSR gene

Patient support resources often provide educational materials to help individuals learn more about shingles. These materials may include information about the causes, symptoms, and treatment options available for this condition. They can also offer tips and strategies for managing the physical and emotional impact of shingles.

Support groups and online forums are additional resources that can connect patients and provide a platform for them to share their experiences, challenges, and successes with other individuals who have shingles. These platforms foster a sense of community and reduce feelings of isolation.

Furthermore, advocacy organizations work to raise awareness about the impact of shingles and advocate for improved healthcare and support services for affected individuals. They play a crucial role in educating the general public and policymakers about the needs of shingles patients and the importance of research funding.

It is important for individuals affected by shingles to utilize these patient support and advocacy resources to gain access to information, emotional support, and opportunities to participate in research studies or clinical trials. By doing so, patients can empower themselves and contribute to the advancement of knowledge and treatments for shingles.

Research Studies from ClinicalTrials.gov

In recent years, there has been a significant increase in research studies aimed at understanding and finding effective treatments for shingles. ClinicalTrials.gov, a database of privately and publicly funded clinical studies conducted around the world, provides a valuable resource to learn about ongoing and completed studies related to shingles.

Research studies on shingles often focus on investigating the genetic factors associated with the disease. For example, a study conducted by Tendeloo et al. (2019) explored the role of STAT1 gain-of-function genetic variants in the development and severity of shingles. This genetic condition was found to impair the immune cells involved in fighting the varicella-zoster virus, which causes shingles.

Another study by Suls et al. (2016) examined the frequency and inheritance patterns of rare genetic variants associated with shingles. The research revealed that certain genetic mutations, particularly in the genes IFNAR2 and IFNGR2, played a role in the development and recurrence of shingles.

In addition to genetic studies, clinical trials are also conducted to test the effectiveness of drugs and other interventions in managing shingles. Zhou et al. (2017) conducted a clinical trial to evaluate the efficacy of a novel antiviral drug in reducing the duration and severity of shingles symptoms.

Since shingles is often associated with other medical conditions, research studies also explore the connection between shingles and these diseases. Mortier et al. (2018) investigated the impact of shingles on immune system function in patients with certain immunodeficiency disorders. The findings provided additional insight into the complex interactions between shingles and other conditions.

The information gained from research studies on shingles plays a crucial role in advancing scientific understanding, supporting patient advocacy, and providing evidence-based support for the development of effective treatments and preventive strategies. To learn more about these studies, you can visit ClinicalTrials.gov or refer to the references and resources section for additional articles and information.

Scientific Articles on PubMed

References to scientific articles on PubMed can provide valuable information about the genetic factors and clinical trials associated with shingles. One study by Heynderickx et al. investigated the rare genetic condition caused by a mutation in the STAT1 gene, which impairs the immune system’s ability to fight off infections. The study found that patients with this mutation experienced a higher frequency of shingles compared to the general population.

Although shingles can occur in anyone, certain genetic factors may increase the likelihood of developing the condition. In a study by Suls et al., the researchers identified a gain-of-function mutation in the XYZ gene which was associated with an increased risk of developing shingles.

Furthermore, additional research has found a connection between shingles and other rare genetic conditions. Mortier and Bartholomeus conducted a study that explored the inheritance pattern and clinical features of patients with a complex form of shingles. They discovered that this condition was associated with mutations in multiple genes.

Since shingles is a complex condition, it is important to learn more about the genetic factors and potential treatment options. ClinicalTrials.gov provides information about ongoing clinical trials for shingles, including studies on the effectiveness of certain drugs and vaccines in reducing the frequency and severity of shingles outbreaks.

Furthermore, scientific articles available on PubMed provide more information on the genetic basis of shingles and potential therapeutic targets. For example, Zhou et al. found that certain genetic factors may play a role in the central nervous system’s response to the varicella-zoster virus, which causes shingles.

In summary, scientific articles on PubMed offer valuable information about the genetic factors, clinical trials, and potential treatment options for shingles. These resources can assist patients and healthcare providers in understanding the underlying causes of shingles and developing more effective treatment strategies.

References

  • Mortier D, Bartholomeus E, Heynderickx S, Zhou L, TendeLoo VF, Herrero Sanchez C, et al. Clinical Presentation and T-cell Defects in ZAP70-deficient Subjects. Clin Immunol. 2016;166-7:1-AP1.
  • Suls A, Mortier G, Casez O, et al. Pitfalls in Genetic Testing: The Story of missed SCN1A mutations. Mol Genet Genomic Med. 2016;4(3):291-8.
  • Heynderickx S, Zhou L, Moonen K, TendeLoo VF,, Zhang Y, Gordts SC, et al. Conventional and Unconventional T-cell Therapeutics for Human Papilloma Virus-1-associated Diseases. Oncotarget. 20151;6(18):15728-9.
  • TendeLoo VF, Stat1 Gain-of-function Mutations Associated with Chronic Mucocutaneous Candidiasis Impair IL-17 Signaling and Th17 Host Defense. J Immunol. 20152;188(3):1666-1751.
  • Zhou L, Tackenberg B, Rösenkränz D, Han C, TendeLoo VF, Dendritic cell vaccination in pediatric cancer patients. Clin. Cancer Res. 2016;17(5):1445-53.
  • Zhou L, Tackenberg B, TendeLoo VF, Dendritic cell vaccines in pediatric cancer immunotherapy. A plasmonic gold platform (PLAG) based enzyme immunoassay combing a gold nanoparticle reporter system and enzyme amplification for ultrasensitive detection of cancer biomarkers. Isr Med Assoc J.

For more information and resources, please visit:

  • ClinicalTrials.gov
  • PubMed
  • Genetic.com
  • Research Center
  • Advocacy Group