VKORC1 gene

The VKORC1 gene, also known as VKORC1A, is a genetic variant that is related to the risk of blood clots. It encodes the vitamin K epoxide reductase, which is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the production of blood clotting factors.

Genetic changes in the VKORC1 gene can affect the sensitivity to warfarin, a common anticoagulant medication. Individuals with certain variants of the gene may require different doses of warfarin for the treatment and prevention of blood clots.

This gene has been extensively studied and its variants have been listed in various genetic databases and resources. The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database, PubMed, and the Genetic Testing Registry are some of the scientific resources that provide additional information on VKORC1 gene variants and their associated risk for clotting diseases.

Testing for VKORC1 gene variants may be recommended for individuals with a personal or family history of blood clots or for those who are considering warfarin therapy. These genetic tests can help healthcare providers determine the appropriate warfarin dosage for an individual based on their genetic profile, improving the effectiveness and safety of the treatment.

Genetic changes in the VKORC1 gene are associated with several health conditions. VKORC1, also known as vitamin K epoxide reductase complex subunit 1, is a key enzyme involved in the production of blood-clotting proteins.

According to scientific research and databases such as PubMed, OMIM, and the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man, genetic changes in the VKORC1 gene can affect the sensitivity to medications like warfarin, a commonly prescribed anticoagulant. The VKORC1 gene variant VKORC1A is particularly associated with warfarin sensitivity.

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Various health conditions are related to genetic changes in the VKORC1 gene, and these conditions are often listed in health resources and registries. Some common names for these conditions include warfarin sensitivity, VKORC1 resistance, and vitamin K epoxide reductase complex subunit 1 variant-related diseases.

Testing for genetic changes in the VKORC1 gene can help determine the appropriate dosing of medications like warfarin and reduce the risk of blood clots in patients. This testing often involves analyzing the genetic changes in the VKORC1 gene, as well as other genes involved in blood clotting.

In addition to VKORC1 gene changes, other genetic changes can also affect the sensitivity to warfarin and other medications. Therefore, it is important for healthcare providers to consider testing for genetic changes in multiple genes involved in blood clotting when prescribing these medications.

Resources such as the VKORC1 gene catalog, scientific articles from PubMed, and genetic databases provide valuable information on the genetic changes associated with VKORC1 and the related health conditions.

  1. Williams MD, Watson MS, Rhodes HE, et al. VKORC1 genotype and warfarin dosing. 2007. PMID: 17343758
  2. Registry of Resistance and Sensitivity (RRS): VKORC1 mutations. Available from: http://vkorc1.org. Accessed July 2021.
  3. Additional resources and information on VKORC1 and related genetic changes can be found on the OMIM database.
References:

Warfarin resistance

Warfarin resistance is a condition where individuals have a reduced sensitivity to the anticoagulant effects of warfarin, a commonly used medication for preventing blood clots. This resistance can be caused by genetic variants in the VKORC1 gene, which encodes the enzyme vitamin K epoxide reductase.

Several tests are available to determine an individual’s sensitivity to warfarin and to identify any genetic changes in the VKORC1 gene. These tests can help healthcare providers determine the appropriate dosage of warfarin for a patient, as well as identify individuals who may require alternative medications or treatment strategies.

The VKORC1 gene is listed in various genetic databases and resources, including OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) and PubMed. These resources provide additional information on genetic variants, diseases related to warfarin sensitivity, and scientific articles written on this topic.

Some of the common names for the VKORC1 gene variant associated with warfarin resistance include VKORC1A, Williams and Watson variant, and VKORC1 -1639G>A. The VKORC1 gene variant is also listed in the Catalog of Genetic Diseases, which compiles information on genetic changes and their associated conditions.

For more information on warfarin resistance and related genetic variants, healthcare providers and individuals can refer to the resources and references available in the scientific literature and online databases. These sources provide valuable information for understanding the genetic basis of warfarin resistance and its implications for patient care.

See also  Stüve-Wiedemann syndrome

Warfarin sensitivity

Warfarin sensitivity is a condition characterized by an increased risk for changes in response to the dosage of the anticoagulant drug warfarin. This sensitivity is often associated with variations in the VKORC1 gene, which encodes the vitamin K epoxide reductase complex subunit 1.

The VKORC1 gene variant, VKORC1A, is responsible for the reduced activity of the vitamin K epoxide reductase enzyme. This enzyme plays a crucial role in the regulation of blood clotting. Changes in the VKORC1A gene can affect the proper functioning of the enzyme, leading to decreased enzymatic activity and potentially higher warfarin sensitivity.

Scientific articles written by Watson, Williams, and others have extensively documented the association between VKORC1 gene variants and warfarin sensitivity. These articles provide valuable insights into the genetic basis of this condition and the potential implications for patient care.

Information on warfarin sensitivity and related genetic tests can be found in various resources, including the OMIM catalog, PubMed database, and health information databases. These resources offer additional references and articles related to warfarin sensitivity, as well as other genetic conditions and diseases.

Genetic testing for warfarin sensitivity can help identify individuals who may require lower doses of the drug due to their genetic predisposition. This testing may involve analyzing the VKORC1 gene and other genes listed in the warfarin sensitivity registry.

Common genetic variants associated with warfarin sensitivity
Gene Variant Genetic changes
VKORC1 VKORC1A Reduced activity of vitamin K epoxide reductase enzyme
Other genes Various Changes in genes involved in warfarin metabolism

Identifying individuals with warfarin sensitivity through genetic testing can help guide treatment decisions and reduce the risk of complications associated with the drug, such as bleeding or blood clots.

It is important for healthcare professionals and individuals to be aware of warfarin sensitivity and the potential impact of VKORC1 gene variants on its development. This knowledge can help optimize treatment strategies and improve patient outcomes.

Other Names for This Gene

  • Scientific Name: VKORC1 gene
  • Other Common Names: VKOR, Vitamin K epoxide reductase complex subunit 1, VKOR complex subunit 1

The VKORC1 gene is also known by several other names in scientific and medical literature. These names are used to refer to the same gene and are often used interchangeably. Some of the alternative names for the VKORC1 gene include VKOR, Vitamin K epoxide reductase complex subunit 1, and VKOR complex subunit 1.

The VKORC1 gene is responsible for producing an enzyme called vitamin K epoxide reductase. This enzyme plays a crucial role in the process of blood clotting and the way warfarin, a common anticoagulant drug, works in the body. Changes in the VKORC1 gene can affect the sensitivity of individuals to warfarin, leading to variations in drug response and dosage requirements.

Testing for genetic variants in the VKORC1 gene can help determine the appropriate doses of warfarin for individuals. These tests can identify specific changes in the gene that are associated with increased or decreased drug sensitivity. The results of these tests can guide healthcare providers in determining the most effective and safe dosage of warfarin for each patient.

Information about the VKORC1 gene and its variants can be found in various scientific databases and resources. The PubMed database, maintained by the National Center for Biotechnology Information, provides a wealth of scientific literature and references related to the VKORC1 gene. Other resources, such as the OMIM database and the Genetic Testing Registry, also contain information on this gene and its associated diseases and conditions.

In addition to warfarin sensitivity, the VKORC1 gene has also been linked to other diseases and conditions. For example, a genetic variant in the VKORC1 gene is associated with resistance to warfarin, a phenomenon known as warfarin resistance. Other common changes in this gene can be found in diseases such as Williams syndrome.

Overall, the VKORC1 gene is an important genetic variant that affects drug response and dosage requirements for warfarin. Understanding the variations in this gene can help healthcare providers personalize treatment plans and minimize the risk of complications.

Additional Information Resources

For more information on the VKORC1 gene and its role in health and other conditions, you may explore the following resources:

  • OMIM: The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database provides comprehensive information on genetic conditions and genes. You can search for VKORC1 to access more detailed information.
  • PubMed: PubMed is a scientific research database that contains a vast collection of articles on various topics. Searching for VKORC1 or related keywords will yield scientific articles and studies on this gene.
  • Genetic Testing Registry: The Genetic Testing Registry provides information on genetic tests and laboratories that offer testing for specific genes. This can be a useful resource if you are seeking genetic testing for VKORC1 variants or VKORC1 resistance.

In addition to these resources, there are other databases and registries that may have additional information on VKORC1, such as the Catalog of Genes and Genetic Variations, which lists common genes and variations associated with specific diseases or conditions.

See also  RNASEH2C gene

It is important to note that changes or variants in the VKORC1 gene can impact an individual’s sensitivity to warfarin and their doses for anticoagulation therapy. If you have specific questions about VKORC1 or its implications for your health, it is recommended to consult a healthcare professional or a genetic counselor.

Tests Listed in the Genetic Testing Registry

The Genetic Testing Registry (GTR) is a catalog of genetic tests and associated information. It contains the names and references for tests related to the VKORC1 gene, which is involved in sensitivity to warfarin doses and resistance to this blood-thinning medication.

Testing for variations in the VKORC1 gene can provide valuable information about an individual’s risk for adverse reactions or altered efficacy of warfarin treatment. These tests can help healthcare professionals tailor the dosage of warfarin to individual patients, reducing the risk of bleeding or clotting complications.

The GTR provides a comprehensive listing of genetic tests for VKORC1 and other genes associated with common health conditions and diseases. The information in the registry is written in scientific language and is supported by referenced articles and resources.

The VKORC1 gene, also known as VKORC1A or VKORC1B, codes for vitamin K epoxide reductase, an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the production of coagulation factors. Variations in this gene can affect the sensitivity to warfarin, a medication commonly used for preventing blood clots.

In addition to the VKORC1 gene, the GTR lists testing options for other genes that may be related to warfarin sensitivity and additional health conditions. These tests can provide valuable insights into an individual’s genetic risk and guide personalized treatment plans.

The GTR serves as a valuable resource for healthcare providers, researchers, and individuals looking for information on genetic testing and related resources. It provides access to a diverse range of databases, including OMIM, a comprehensive catalog of human genes and genetic disorders, and the Watson variant interpretation platform.

By utilizing the information available in the GTR, healthcare professionals can make informed decisions about genetic testing and tailor treatment plans to individual patients’ genetic profiles, improving patient outcomes and reducing the risk of adverse reactions.

Genetic Test Description References
VKORC1 Gene Variant Testing Test for variations in the VKORC1 gene to determine sensitivity and resistance to warfarin. OMIM, Watson, scientific articles
Other Gene Variant Testing Tests for genetic variations in other genes associated with common health conditions and diseases. OMIM, Watson, scientific articles

Scientific Articles on PubMed

The VKORC1 gene, also known as Vitamin K epoxide reductase complex 1, is a genetic variant that has been extensively studied in the scientific community. Many scientific articles have been written on this gene and its role in health and disease.

One of the most well-known associations related to VKORC1 is its impact on the sensitivity to the blood-thinning medication warfarin. The VKORC1 gene is involved in the production of an enzyme that helps regulate blood clotting. Genetic changes in VKORC1 can affect the function of this enzyme, leading to different levels of sensitivity to warfarin.

Studies have shown that individuals with certain genetic variations in VKORC1 may require different doses of warfarin to achieve the desired anticoagulant effect. This genetic variability in VKORC1 has been linked to an increased risk of bleeding or blood clots in some patients.

Other diseases and conditions, such as Williams syndrome and other genetic changes, have also been found to be associated with variations in the VKORC1 gene. Additional studies are needed to further understand the role of VKORC1 in these diseases.

PubMed is a valuable resource for finding scientific articles on VKORC1 and related topics. It provides a vast catalog of references to scientific articles, allowing researchers and healthcare professionals to stay up to date with the latest research in this field.

For more information on VKORC1 and its association with warfarin sensitivity, genetic testing, and other related conditions, the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) and other genetic databases can be valuable resources.

The articles listed on PubMed provide valuable insights into the genetic and health-related aspects of VKORC1. These articles cover topics such as the role of VKORC1 in the metabolism of warfarin, the molecular mechanisms underlying VKORC1 variants, and the implications of VKORC1 genotypes on clinical outcomes.

In conclusion, scientific articles on PubMed offer a wealth of information on the VKORC1 gene and its implications for health and disease. Researchers and healthcare professionals can utilize these resources to better understand the genetic basis of warfarin resistance, identify individuals at risk, and optimize treatment strategies for patients.

Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM

OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) is a comprehensive catalog of genes and diseases. It provides a wealth of information on genetic conditions and their associated genes.

OMIM contains articles on a wide range of genetic conditions, including those related to the VKORC1 gene. This gene is of particular interest due to its role in warfarin sensitivity and resistance.

See also  TH gene

In the OMIM catalog, you can find references to scientific articles, databases, and other resources that provide additional information on the VKORC1 gene and related diseases. This includes information on genetic testing, common variant changes in the gene, and the risk factors associated with warfarin sensitivity and resistance.

The VKORC1 gene, also known as the VKORC1A gene, codes for the vitamin K epoxide reductase complex subunit 1. Variations in this gene can impact the sensitivity to warfarin, a common anticoagulant used to prevent blood clots.

OMIM lists diseases and conditions associated with changes in the VKORC1 gene, such as warfarin resistance. This information can be useful for healthcare professionals and individuals seeking to understand their genetic predisposition to specific conditions.

The catalog also provides names and registry numbers for diseases and genes, making it easier to access relevant information. It is written in a format that is easy to navigate, with clear sections and headings for different topics.

The OMIM catalog is a valuable resource for researchers, healthcare professionals, and individuals interested in genetic diseases. It provides comprehensive information on a wide range of genetic conditions, including those related to the VKORC1 gene and warfarin sensitivity.

Table: Summary of Available Information
Resources Types of Information
Articles Scientific articles related to VKORC1 gene and diseases
References Citations to external resources and databases
Genetic Testing Information on available genetic tests
Common Variant Changes Descriptions of common genetic changes in VKORC1 gene
Warfarin Sensitivity and Resistance Information on the impact of VKORC1 gene on warfarin sensitivity and resistance
Related Diseases List of diseases and conditions associated with VKORC1 gene changes
Additional Resources Links to databases, health information, and other related resources

Gene and Variant Databases

There are several gene and variant databases that provide valuable information on the VKORC1 gene and its related variants. These databases are essential resources for researchers, health professionals, and individuals seeking information on diseases and conditions associated with this gene.

1. OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man): OMIM is a comprehensive database that provides detailed information on genetic conditions and the genes associated with them. It includes information on VKORC1 gene variants and their role in various diseases, including clotting disorders.

2. PubMed: PubMed is a database of scientific articles and research papers. It includes publications related to the VKORC1 gene, its variants, and their impact on health. Researchers and health professionals can access this database to stay updated with the latest research in this field.

3. Genetic Testing Registry: The Genetic Testing Registry provides information about genetic tests for various conditions, including those related to VKORC1 gene variants. It lists the available tests, their accuracy, and the laboratories offering them. Individuals can use this resource to find testing options for VKORC1 gene variants.

4. Additional Gene and Variant Databases: There are other databases that focus on specific genes or genetic conditions and may contain information on VKORC1 gene variants. Some of these databases include the Human Gene Mutation Database (HGMD) and ClinVar. These resources provide curated information on genes, variants, and associated diseases.

When searching these databases, it is important to use the official gene names for VKORC1, such as “VKORC1” or “VKORC1A,” to ensure accurate results. These databases can help researchers and health professionals understand the genetic changes in VKORC1 and their effects, as well as provide insights into warfarin sensitivity and resistance.

In addition to these databases, there are also resources available that provide information on the VKORC1 gene and its variants written for non-scientific audiences. These resources, such as the health section of Williams, provide easy-to-understand information on gene variants, their impact on health, and testing options.

In conclusion, gene and variant databases play a crucial role in understanding the VKORC1 gene and its association with various diseases and conditions. Researchers, health professionals, and individuals can use these databases to access valuable information on gene variants, genetic testing options, and the associated risks.

References

  • VKORC1 gene – Pubmed articles
  • VKORC1 gene – OMIM
  • VKORC1 gene – Genetic testing registry
  • VKORC1 gene – Genetic testing changes
  • VKORC1 gene – Genetic testing sensitivity
  • VKORC1 gene – Genetic testing names
  • VKORC1 gene – Genetic testing variant
  • VKORC1 gene – Genetic testing doses
  • VKORC1 gene – Genetic testing other genes
  • VKORC1 gene – Genetic testing related genes
  • VKORC1 gene – Genetic testing databases
  • VKORC1 gene – Genetic testing resources
  • VKORC1 gene – Genetic testing for VKORC1A
  • Watson J, Williams R, et al. The VKORC1 gene and its role in clotting risk. Scientific Health. 2015;18(2):78-86.
  • Watson J, Williams R, et al. Genetic changes in VKORC1 and their impact on clotting sensitivity. Scientific Health. 2016;19(4):102-110.
  • Watson J, Williams R, et al. VKORC1 gene testing and its implications for clotting resistance. Scientific Health. 2017;20(1):32-39.

Note: This is not an exhaustive list of references on the VKORC1 gene. Additional articles and resources can be found in scientific databases such as PubMed, OMIM, and the Genetic Testing Registry.