Achondroplasia is a rare genetic condition characterized by short stature and other skeletal abnormalities. It is the most common cause of dwarfism, affecting approximately 1 in 15,000 to 40,000 births worldwide. The condition is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, which means that a person with achondroplasia has a 50% chance of passing on the condition to their children.

Achondroplasia is caused by a mutation in the FGFR3 gene, which provides instructions for making a protein involved in the normal growth and development of bones. This mutation leads to abnormal bone growth and development, particularly in the long bones of the arms and legs. In addition to short stature, individuals with achondroplasia may have features such as a prominent forehead, a flattened bridge of the nose, and a short neck.

While achondroplasia is a genetic condition, it is important to note that it does not affect a person’s intellectual or cognitive abilities. Individuals with achondroplasia can lead normal, fulfilling lives with appropriate medical care and support.

There are currently no cures for achondroplasia, but there are treatment options available to manage the symptoms and complications associated with the condition. These may include regular check-ups with healthcare professionals, physical therapy, and surgical interventions to address specific issues like spinal stenosis or compression of the spinal cord. Ongoing research and clinical trials are also being conducted to better understand the causes of achondroplasia and develop potential therapies.

For more information about achondroplasia, including additional resources and support for individuals and families affected by the condition, refer to the Achondroplasia Research Center, OMIM database, and PubMed for related articles and studies. ClinicalTrials.gov is another valuable resource to learn about ongoing clinical trials and research studies related to achondroplasia.

Frequency

Achondroplasia is a relatively rare genetic condition. According to advocacy groups and genetic studies, it is estimated to affect approximately 1 in every 15,000 to 40,000 live births.

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The condition is caused by a mutation in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) gene. This gene is responsible for producing a protein that regulates bone growth. In achondroplastic individuals, this gene mutation leads to the overproduction of the protein, resulting in abnormal bone growth and the characteristic features of achondroplasia.

Although achondroplasia is the most common form of dwarfism, there are other rare genetic conditions associated with short stature. These conditions have different names and involve mutations in other genes. Some of these conditions include hypochondroplasia, thanatophoric dysplasia, and pseudoachondroplasia.

The frequency of these other genetic conditions is significantly lower than that of achondroplasia. They are estimated to affect less than 1 in every 100,000 live births.

For more information on the frequency of achondroplasia and other related genetic conditions, you can refer to resources such as the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database, scientific articles, and genetic studies. Additionally, the National Institutes of Health’s Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center and clinicaltrials.gov provide additional resources and information on inheritance patterns, testing, and ongoing research.

Causes

Achondroplasia is a genetic condition that occurs due to changes in a specific gene called the FGFR3 gene. This gene provides instructions for making a protein that is involved in the development and maintenance of bone and brain tissue.

The FGFR3 gene mutation responsible for achondroplasia is usually a new mutation that occurs sporadically, without inheritance from the parents. However, in some cases, it can be inherited from an affected parent with achondroplasia.

The frequency of achondroplasia is rare, occurring in about 1 in every 15,000 to 40,000 births. It is the most common form of dwarfism and is characterized by short stature, disproportionately short arms and legs, and other distinguishing features.

The exact causes of achondroplasia are still being researched, and there are ongoing studies and clinical trials to learn more about the condition. Some resources for research and support include the National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD), the Achondroplasia Research Center, and the Advisory Committee on Genetic Testing.

In individuals with achondroplasia, the FGFR3 gene mutation leads to abnormal bone growth. It affects the conversion of cartilage into bone, resulting in shorter bones and abnormal proportions. This mutation can also cause narrowing of the spinal canal (stenosis) and compression of the spinal cord.

For more detailed information about the genetics and causes of achondroplasia, you can refer to scientific articles and publications available on PubMed and OMIM. These resources provide comprehensive information about the gene mutations, protein structures, and associated symptoms.

It is important for individuals with achondroplasia and their families to stay updated with the latest research and clinical trials. Participation in clinical trials can contribute to scientific advancements and potentially lead to improved treatments and management strategies for this condition. ClinicalTrials.gov is a valuable resource for finding ongoing studies related to achondroplasia.

In addition, advocacy organizations and patient support groups can provide valuable resources and support for individuals and families affected by achondroplasia. These organizations can help connect individuals with medical experts, provide emotional support, and offer educational materials and resources.

References:

See also  APTX gene

Learn more about the gene associated with Achondroplasia

Achondroplasia is a rare genetic condition that affects the growth and development of bones. It is caused by mutations in the FGFR3 gene, which provides instructions for making a protein called fibroblast growth factor receptor 3.

The FGFR3 gene is located on chromosome 4. Mutations in this gene result in an overactive protein that interferes with the normal growth of long bones, leading to the characteristic features of achondroplasia.

To diagnose achondroplasia, genetic testing can be done to identify specific mutations in the FGFR3 gene. This can be done using samples of blood, cord blood, or skin cells (fibroblasts).

Studies have shown that more than 99% of individuals with achondroplasia have a mutation in the FGFR3 gene. Information about these mutations, as well as other genes associated with rare bone diseases, can be found in resources such as OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) and the Genetic Testing Registry.

ClinicalTrials.gov is a valuable resource for finding information about ongoing research studies and clinical trials related to achondroplasia. By searching for “achondroplasia” on ClinicalTrials.gov, you can find information about studies recruiting patients for research on this condition.

In addition to scientific research and clinical trials, there are also advocacy organizations and support groups that provide resources and support for individuals with achondroplasia and their families. These organizations can provide information about the condition, connect individuals with medical experts, and offer support networks.

If you are interested in learning more about the genetics of achondroplasia, there are many articles and publications available on the topic. PubMed is a great resource for finding scientific articles about achondroplasia and related research.

Overall, understanding the gene associated with achondroplasia is important for diagnosis, treatment, and research efforts. By learning more about the FGFR3 gene and the mutations that cause achondroplasia, we can better understand the underlying causes of this rare condition and work towards improved treatments and interventions.

Inheritance

Achondroplasia is a genetic disorder that occurs as a result of a mutation in the FGFR3 gene. This gene is responsible for encoding a protein called fibroblast growth factor receptor 3, which plays a role in the normal development and growth of bones.

Achondroplasia is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern, which means that a person only needs to inherit one copy of the mutated gene from either parent in order to develop the condition. If one parent has achondroplasia, there is a 50% chance that their child will inherit the condition.

The frequency of achondroplasia in the general population is estimated to be approximately 1 in 25,000 to 40,000 live births. However, the frequency may vary depending on the population studied.

Diagnosis of achondroplasia can be confirmed through genetic testing. This involves analyzing a sample of DNA, typically obtained from a blood or skin fibroblast sample, to identify mutations in the FGFR3 gene. ClinicalTrials.gov and research studies provide additional resources for finding genetic testing centers and clinical trials related to achondroplasia.

Achondroplasia is associated with various medical complications, such as spinal stenosis, which is the narrowing of the spinal cord. These complications may require additional medical intervention and treatment.

For more information on the genetics of achondroplasia, the OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) catalog provides a comprehensive list of genes associated with the condition. PubMed is another valuable resource for scientific articles and research studies on achondroplasia and related conditions.

Advocacy and support groups are available for individuals and families affected by achondroplasia. These organizations provide resources, support, and information on the causes and management of the condition. It is important to stay informed about the latest research and advancements in the field of achondroplasia to ensure the best possible care for individuals with this rare genetic disorder.

Other Names for This Condition

Achondroplasia, also called achondroplastic dwarfism, is a rare genetic condition that causes short stature. It is usually inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern, which means an affected person has a 50% chance of passing the condition on to each of their children.

Here are some other names and terms commonly associated with achondroplasia:

  • Achondroplastic dwarfism
  • Achondroplastic dwarfism syndrome
  • Achondroplastic dysplasia
  • ACH
  • Achondroplasia, Houston type

For more information about achondroplasia, you can visit the following resources:

  • Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD): GARD provides information about achondroplasia, its symptoms, causes, inheritance, and more. It also offers links to additional resources and support groups.
  • OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man): OMIM is a comprehensive catalog of human genes and genetic disorders. It provides detailed scientific information about achondroplasia, including references to research articles and genetic studies.
  • PubMed: PubMed is a database of scientific research articles. You can search for publications about achondroplasia to learn more about the condition and the latest research findings.
  • ClinicalTrials.gov: ClinicalTrials.gov is a registry of clinical trials. You can find information about ongoing or upcoming studies related to achondroplasia, including studies on potential treatments and interventions.

Without treatment, achondroplasia can cause various health problems, such as spinal stenosis and compression of the spinal cord. Regular medical monitoring and support from healthcare providers are essential for managing the condition.

Overall, learning more about achondroplasia can help patients and their families navigate the challenges associated with the condition and find the support they need.

Additional Information Resources

For more information about achondroplasia, its inheritance, and other genetic diseases, you can find support and advocacy from the following resources:

  • Advocacy Organizations:
    • Little People of America: www.lpaonline.org
    • Achondroplasia Support and Information Network: www.asinsupport.org
  • References and Scientific Articles:
  • Research and Clinical Trials:
  • Patient Support and Information:
    • Little People of America Medical Resource Center: www.lpaonline.org/medical
    • Achondroplasia Information and Support Service: www.achondroplasia.info
  • Other Resources:
    • Achondroplasia Research Center: www.achondroplasiaresearchcenter.com
    • Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 3 (FGFR3) Protein: www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/gene/2261
    • Achondroplasia Information and Research Catalog: www.achondroplasia-catalog.org
See also  Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes

Learn more about the causes, frequency, and associated conditions of achondroplasia by accessing these additional resources. Genetic testing for the achondroplasia gene can provide further information about this condition. Clinical trials and studies also contribute to ongoing research and understanding of achondroplasia.

Genetic Testing Information

Genetic testing for achondroplasia is available to confirm a diagnosis and provide more information about the condition. It can also help determine the chance of having a child with achondroplasia.

This genetic condition is caused by a mutation in the FGFR3 gene. This gene provides instructions for making a protein called fibroblast growth factor receptor 3. Mutations in this gene lead to the production of a faulty protein that disrupts normal bone growth and development, resulting in the characteristic features of achondroplasia.

Genetic testing can be done through various methods, such as DNA sequencing or targeted mutation analysis. It involves analyzing a sample of DNA, usually obtained through a blood sample or by swabbing the inside of the cheek. The results can confirm or rule out the presence of the FGFR3 gene mutation associated with achondroplasia.

Genetic testing for achondroplasia can provide important information for patients and their families. It can help them understand the cause of the condition and make informed decisions about family planning. It can also be helpful for healthcare professionals in managing the medical care of individuals with achondroplasia.

There are several resources available to learn more about genetic testing for achondroplasia:

  • Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center – Offers additional information on achondroplasia, including inheritance patterns and genetic counseling resources.
  • OMIM – Provides scientific information about the genes associated with achondroplasia, including the FGFR3 gene.
  • PubMed – Offers a catalog of articles on genetic testing for achondroplasia and related topics.
  • ClinicalTrials.gov – Provides information on ongoing research studies and clinical trials related to achondroplasia and genetic testing.
  • Achondroplasia Support and Advocacy Resources – Offers support for individuals and families affected by achondroplasia, including information on genetic testing.

Genetic testing is an important tool for understanding and managing achondroplasia. It can provide valuable information about the condition’s causes and inheritance patterns, and it may support ongoing research efforts to find new treatments. For more information, consult the references and resources mentioned above.

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center

Achondroplasia is a genetic condition that affects bone growth, resulting in stenosis of the spinal cord. It is a rare disease that has a frequency of 1 in 15,000 to 1 in 40,000 births. The condition is caused by a mutation in the FGFR3 gene, which codes for a protein involved in the growth of bone and cartilage.

People with achondroplasia have shorter limbs and a larger head compared to individuals without the condition. Other associated features include lordosis (excessive curvature of the lower spine), bowing of the legs, and hearing loss. Learn more about achondroplasia and its symptoms by visiting the Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) website.

GARD provides valuable resources, articles, and additional information on achondroplasia. You can also find links to other related diseases and conditions. The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) catalog provides in-depth, scientific information about the condition and related genes. OMIM is a comprehensive database that gathers information from genetic studies, clinical trials, and scientific publications.

For patients and families, support and advocacy organizations such as the Little People of America provide information, resources, and community support. The GARD website also includes references to clinical trials, which are research studies that investigate new treatments and therapies for achondroplasia.

If you suspect that you or someone you know may have achondroplasia, genetic testing can confirm the diagnosis. GARD provides information on genetic testing for achondroplasia and a list of laboratories that offer these services. It is important to consult with a healthcare provider or genetic counselor to understand the testing process and its implications.

References:

  1. Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)
  2. Little People of America
  3. Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM)
  4. PubMed and ClinicalTrials.gov – resources for research and clinical trials

Patient Support and Advocacy Resources

Patients and families affected by achondroplasia, a rare genetic condition that causes short stature, can benefit from various support and advocacy resources. These resources provide information, support, and advocacy for individuals affected by achondroplasia and their families.

  • Achondroplasia Research and Advocacy Organizations: These organizations focus on supporting and advocating for individuals with achondroplasia. They provide resources, assistance, and information about current research and advancements in the field.
  • Patient Support Groups: Support groups offer a platform for patients and families to connect, share experiences, and provide emotional support. These groups often have online forums, in-person meetings, and events specifically for individuals with achondroplasia.
  • ClinicalTrials.gov: ClinicalTrials.gov is a comprehensive database of clinical studies that are currently recruiting patients. Patients with achondroplasia may find information about ongoing clinical trials and studies related to their condition on this platform. It is essential for patients to consult with their healthcare professionals before participating in any clinical trials.
  • Genetic Testing and Counseling: Genetic testing can provide more information about the specific gene mutations and inheritance patterns associated with achondroplasia. Genetic counselors can help patients understand the results of their genetic testing and provide guidance on family planning.
  • Scientific Articles and References: Scientific articles and references, including articles published in journals like PubMed and OMIM, provide detailed information about the genetics, causes, and associated diseases of achondroplasia. These resources can help patients and families learn more about the condition and stay updated on the latest research findings.
  • Rare Disease Resources: Resources specifically dedicated to rare diseases often provide valuable information for individuals with achondroplasia. These resources may include support groups, research funding opportunities, and educational materials.
  • Additional Resources: There are various additional resources available for patients and families affected by achondroplasia, ranging from educational websites and articles to books and documentaries. These resources can help individuals learn more about achondroplasia and empower them to advocate for their needs.
See also  WDR35 gene

It is important for patients with achondroplasia to utilize these resources to stay informed, connected, and supported in their journey. With access to patient support and advocacy resources, individuals with achondroplasia can lead fulfilling lives and actively participate in their healthcare decisions.

Research Studies from ClinicalTrialsgov

The condition known as achondroplasia is a rare genetic disorder that is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. It is caused by mutations in the FGFR3 gene, which is responsible for producing a protein that is important for the growth and development of bones. People with achondroplasia have shorter limbs, a larger head, and other physical characteristics associated with the condition.

Research studies on achondroplasia are being conducted to learn more about the genetic causes of the condition, as well as to develop better ways to diagnose and manage it. ClinicalTrials.gov is a resource that provides information on ongoing research studies related to achondroplasia and other rare diseases.

One study listed on ClinicalTrials.gov is focused on the frequency and characteristics of spinal stenosis and cord compression in people with achondroplasia. The aim of this study is to gather more information on these complications and develop better guidelines for their diagnosis and management.

Another study is investigating the use of fibroblast growth factor receptor inhibitors in the treatment of achondroplasia. These inhibitors target the FGFR3 gene and protein, with the goal of promoting normal bone growth and development in individuals with the condition.

More research studies can be found on ClinicalTrials.gov, providing additional information on the genetic basis of achondroplasia and potential therapeutic approaches. This catalog of studies is a valuable resource for patients, advocacy groups, and scientific researchers involved in the study of this rare genetic condition.

Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM

OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) is a comprehensive catalog of genes and genetic diseases. This online resource provides valuable information on rare genetic conditions, including achondroplasia. Here, you can learn about the genetic causes of achondroplasia and access additional resources for further research and support.

  • Genes Associated with Achondroplasia: The gene associated with achondroplasia is FGFR3. This gene produces a protein that plays a role in bone growth and development. Mutations in the FGFR3 gene cause the characteristic features of achondroplasia.
  • Inheritance: Achondroplasia is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, which means that an affected individual has a 50% chance of passing on the condition to their children.
  • Clinical Features: Achondroplasia is characterized by short stature, disproportionate limb length, a large head with a prominent forehead, and other skeletal abnormalities. Spinal stenosis and associated cord compression are common complications.
  • Frequency: Achondroplasia is the most common form of dwarfism, with an estimated frequency of 1 in 15,000 to 1 in 40,000 births.
  • OMIM Catalog: The OMIM catalog provides detailed information on achondroplasia, including genetic background, clinical features, and associated complications. It also offers references to scientific articles and other resources for further reading.

For more information on achondroplasia and other rare genetic diseases, you can visit the OMIM website or contact genetic centers and advocacy organizations specializing in rare conditions. Additional resources can be found at the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS), PubMed, and clinicaltrialsgov.

Scientific Articles on PubMed

PubMed is a popular online resource for scientific articles related to various topics, including achondroplasia. Below is a list of articles available on PubMed that cover different aspects of achondroplasia.

  • OMIM – A comprehensive catalog of human genes and genetic disorders, including information about achondroplasia. This resource provides detailed information about the gene associated with achondroplasia, its inheritance pattern, and other related conditions.
  • Learn.Genetics – A platform that offers educational resources on genetics and provides information about achondroplasia, its causes, and inheritance.
  • Protein Atlas – A database that provides information about protein expression in various tissues, including fibroblast cells. It may contain information about the protein expression related to achondroplasia.
  • PubMed – PubMed is a valuable resource for scientific articles and research studies on achondroplasia. It offers a wide range of articles exploring different aspects of the condition, including its clinical presentation, associated complications, and potential treatment options.
  • Scientific Articles on ClinicalTrials.gov – ClinicalTrials.gov provides a platform for publishing clinical research studies related to various medical conditions, including achondroplasia. This resource may contain information about ongoing or completed clinical trials investigating new treatments or interventions for achondroplasia.

Additional resources for achondroplasia include support groups, advocacy organizations, and patient information centers. These resources can provide further information about the condition, research studies, and support services for individuals affected by achondroplasia.

References

  1. Center for Developmental Biology and Regenerative Medicine. (n.d.). Causes – Achondroplasia.

    Retrieved from https://www.cdb.riken.jp/en/achondroplasia/

  2. Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 3 (FGFR3) Gene. (n.d.). OMIM.

    Retrieved from https://omim.org/entry/134934

  3. Achondroplasia. (n.d.). Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center.

    Retrieved from https://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/diseases/665/achondroplasia

  4. Achondroplasia. (n.d.). NIH: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases.

    Retrieved from https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/achondroplasia

  5. Achondroplasia. (n.d.). Genetics Home Reference.

    Retrieved from https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/achondroplasia/

  6. Achondroplasia. (n.d.). Achondroplasia Advocacy of Australia.

    Retrieved from https://www.achofa.org.au/about-achondroplasia/

  7. Achondroplasia. (n.d.). ClinicalTrials.gov.

    Retrieved from https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/results?cond=achondroplasia&term=&cntry=&state=&city=&dist=

  8. Achondroplasia. (n.d.). PubMed.

    Retrieved from https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/?term=Achondroplasia

  9. Achondroplasia. (n.d.). Orphanet.

    Retrieved from https://www.orpha.net/consor/cgi-bin/Disease_Search.php?lng=EN&data_id=11925&Disease(s)/group%20of%20diseases=Achondroplasia&title=Achondroplasia&search=Disease_Search_Simple

  10. Achondroplasia. (n.d.). Genetic Testing Registry (GTR).

    Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/gtr/conditions/C0001080/