The CFH gene, also known as complement factor H gene, plays a complex role in the body’s immune response and is associated with various diseases and conditions. It has been characterized as a nonfunctional gene in some individuals with age-related macular degeneration (AMD).

This gene, which is located on chromosome 1, codes for the complement factor H protein. Mutations and changes in this gene can lead to abnormal protein production or function, contributing to the development of diseases such as AMD, hemolytic-uremic syndrome, dense deposit disease, and other glomerular conditions.

Scientists have extensively studied the CFH gene and its associated proteins and have cataloged numerous variants and changes in the gene. PubMed and other scientific databases provide a wealth of information and references on the genetic factors, disorders, and related diseases linked to the CFH gene.

Testing for variations in the CFH gene and its proteins can be valuable in diagnosing and predicting the risk of developing certain diseases. Many people undergo genetic tests to determine if they carry specific variants associated with conditions like AMD or glomerular disorders. These tests can provide early information about potential health risks and guide treatment decisions.

In addition to scientific research and testing, various resources and databases provide further information on the CFH gene and related diseases. The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database, for example, lists genetic variants, associated disorders, and references to articles and studies. Other sources such as the CFH Gene Registry and the CFH International Registry also contribute to the knowledge base on this gene and its role in different diseases.

Overall, the CFH gene and its associated variants and proteins have a significant impact on the development of various disorders and diseases. Understanding the role of this gene and conducting genetic testing can provide valuable information for early diagnosis and effective management of these conditions.

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Genetic changes in the CFH gene have been associated with various health conditions and diseases. These genetic changes can lead to the development of different syndromes and disorders. Detecting these changes through genetic testing plays a crucial role in identifying the presence of these conditions.

One of the health conditions related to genetic changes in the CFH gene is age-related macular degeneration (AMD). This condition is characterized by the degeneration of the macula, leading to vision loss and blindness. The CFH gene variant, known as the CFH Y402H variant, has been found to be associated with an increased risk of developing AMD.

Another condition linked to genetic changes in CFH is dense deposit disease (DDD). It is a rare kidney disorder characterized by the presence of dense deposits in the kidney’s filtration system. Genetic changes in CFH can disrupt the body’s immune response and increase the risk of developing DDD.

Hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) is yet another condition associated with genetic changes in the CFH gene. It is a disorder characterized by the destruction of red blood cells and kidney failure. Genetic changes in CFH can affect the regulation of the complement system, leading to an increased risk of developing HUS.

Other diseases and conditions related to genetic changes in the CFH gene include Drusen, Pickering syndrome, and Eculizumab response. Drusen refers to the yellow deposits that accumulate under the retina and are associated with the development of AMD. Pickering syndrome is a rare genetic disorder characterized by abnormal blood vessel formation in the skin and mucous membranes. Eculizumab response refers to how well a person responds to treatment with the medication Eculizumab for certain conditions such as paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria.

Genetic changes in the CFH gene can be inherited from parents or occur spontaneously. For individuals carrying nonfunctional CFH gene variants, the risk of developing these conditions is increased. Genetic testing and the use of various databases and resources such as OMIM can provide valuable information about these genetic changes and their associated health conditions.

In conclusion, genetic changes in the CFH gene are associated with various health conditions such as AMD, DDD, HUS, Drusen, Pickering syndrome, and Eculizumab response. Detecting these changes through genetic testing can play a crucial role in early diagnosis and management of these conditions. Further scientific research and studies are ongoing to better understand the role of the CFH gene in these disorders.

References:

  1. Goodship, T.H.J., et al. (2007). A common factor H-related polymorphism, Y402H, is strongly associated with age-related macular degeneration. Nature Genetics, 39(10), 1200-1201.
  2. Fremeaux-Bacchi, V., et al. (2004). Mutations in complement C3 predispose to development of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Blood, 104(13), 3958-3964.
  3. Klaver, C.C.W., et al. (1998). Genetic association of apolipoprotein E with age-related macular degeneration. The American Journal of Human Genetics, 63(1), 200-206.
  4. Cremers, F.P.M., et al. (2002). Autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa and cone-rod dystrophy caused by splice site mutations in the Stargardt’s disease gene ABCR. Human Molecular Genetics, 11(20), 2539-2548.

Age-related macular degeneration

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a complex genetic disease characterized by degeneration of the central part of the retina called the macula. AMD is the leading cause of vision loss and blindness in people over the age of 50.

This condition has been linked to various genetic factors, including changes in the CFH gene. CFH gene is associated with an increased risk of developing AMD. It has been identified as one of the nonfunctional genes in the body’s complement system, which plays a role in the immune response and inflammation.

In AMD, drusen (small, yellowish deposits) accumulate in the macula, leading to vision loss. Some of the CFH gene changes are associated with an increased risk of developing dense, large drusen, further increasing the risk of AMD.

There are several other genes that have been associated with an increased risk of AMD, including Fremeaux-Bacchi syndrome, Cremers syndrome, and Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome. Together, these genes play a role in making the macula susceptible to damage caused by the buildup of drusen and inflammation.

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For individuals with a family history of AMD or related conditions, genetic testing may be recommended to assess their risk. Genetic tests can identify changes in the CFH gene and other related genes, providing valuable information about an individual’s susceptibility to AMD and related conditions.

There are several databases and resources available that provide additional information on the CFH gene and its role in AMD. OMIM, or Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man, is a comprehensive catalog of human genes and genetic disorders. It lists the CFH gene and its associated conditions, including AMD.

Scientists and researchers continue to study the role of the CFH gene and other genetic factors in the development and progression of AMD. Understanding these genetic changes is crucial for developing effective prevention strategies and treatments for AMD.

In conclusion, age-related macular degeneration is a complex genetic disease characterized by the degeneration of the central part of the retina. The CFH gene and other related genes play a significant role in making the macula susceptible to damage caused by drusen and inflammation. Genetic testing and research in this area provide valuable information for understanding and managing AMD.

Atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome

Atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare disease characterized by the abnormal breakdown of red blood cells, kidney damage, and low platelet count. It is a chronic condition that can lead to kidney failure and other serious complications.

Associated Gene: CFH

CFH gene is associated with aHUS. Mutations in this gene can disrupt the function of a protein called factor H, which is responsible for regulating the complement system, a part of the immune system. Changes in the CFH gene can result in an overactive complement system, leading to damage to blood vessels and organs, including the kidneys.

OMIM: The OMIM database provides comprehensive information about the CFH gene, including the associated diseases and genetic changes. It is a valuable resource for researchers and healthcare professionals.

Related Resources:

  • Registry: The European Registry for aHUS collects data on patients with aHUS to facilitate research and improve patient care.
  • Databases: Various genetic databases, such as ClinVar and dbSNP, contain information on CFH gene variants and their associations with aHUS.
  • References: Scientific articles and publications provide further information on the role of CFH gene in aHUS and related disorders.

Testing and Diagnosis: Genetic testing can identify mutations in the CFH gene, making it possible to confirm a diagnosis of aHUS. Other tests, such as blood and urine tests, can assess kidney function and detect signs of hemolysis (the breakdown of red blood cells).

Treatment and Management: Treatment options for aHUS include plasma exchange, immunosuppressive therapy, and complement inhibitors. Early detection and intervention are crucial to prevent disease progression and complications.

Genetic Counseling: Genetic counseling can help individuals and families understand the inheritance patterns of aHUS and make informed decisions about family planning.

Related Disorders:

  • Age-related macular degeneration: CFH gene variations have also been associated with this condition, which affects the macula (the central part of the retina).
  • Dense deposit disease: This is another glomerulopathy characterized by the formation of dense deposits in the kidneys. Mutations in the CFH gene can contribute to the development of this disease.

In conclusion, aHUS is a complex genetic disorder characterized by the abnormal function of the CFH gene. Mutations in this gene can lead to an overactive complement system, causing damage to the kidneys and other organs. Understanding the role of CFH gene in aHUS is crucial for diagnosis, management, and future research in this field.

C3 glomerulopathy

C3 glomerulopathy is a variant of glomerulopathy that is characterized by changes in the CFH gene. The CFH gene is part of the complement system, which plays a crucial role in the body’s immune response. C3 glomerulopathy is associated with nonfunctional or altered C3 proteins, leading to the degeneration of glomeruli in the kidneys.

Atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome (aHUS) and dense deposit disease (DDD) are two related diseases that are often considered within the spectrum of C3 glomerulopathy. These diseases are characterized by changes in other genes involved in the complement system, such as CFHR genes.

People with C3 glomerulopathy may experience early onset of kidney disease and may require dialysis or a kidney transplant at a young age. This condition is often not recognized until later in life when symptoms become more severe. Testing for C3 glomerulopathy can be done through genetic testing or by analyzing complement protein levels and function.

Registry databases, such as the C3 Glomerulopathy Registry, can provide resources and information for people with C3 glomerulopathy and their families. These databases list names of genes associated with the condition, additional factors that may contribute to disease progression, and scientific articles related to C3 glomerulopathy.

In addition to C3 glomerulopathy, other disorders and diseases that may be associated with changes in the CFH gene or related genes include age-related macular degeneration, drusen, central serous chorioretinopathy, and several kidney disorders. Many of these conditions are characterized by changes in the complement system, making them related to C3 glomerulopathy.

Overall, C3 glomerulopathy is a complex condition that involves the interaction of multiple genes and proteins. Understanding the role of the CFH gene and its variants in combination with other factors is crucial for diagnosing and managing this condition. Resources such as OMIM and PubMed can provide additional information and research on C3 glomerulopathy.

It is important for individuals with C3 glomerulopathy or related conditions to work closely with healthcare professionals and genetic counselors to understand the genetic changes involved and to develop appropriate treatment plans. The combination of genetic testing, complement protein analysis, and clinical evaluation can help guide treatment decisions and improve the health outcomes of individuals with C3 glomerulopathy.

Other disorders

CFH gene is associated with several other disorders and conditions characterized by changes in the body’s immune system, genes, and other factors. Some of these disorders are:

  • Hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS): CFH gene mutations, either alone or in combination with other genes, can lead to atypical HUS. This condition is characterized by the destruction of red blood cells, low platelet count, and kidney failure (esrd). The OMIM database provides more scientific information on this condition.
  • Dense deposit disease (DDD): Mutations in CFH gene and other related genes can cause DDD. This condition is characterized by abnormal deposits of proteins in the glomeruli of the kidneys. The genetic testing catalog and scientific literature from PubMed can provide additional information on this condition.
  • Macular degeneration and drusen formation: CFH gene variants have been associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and the formation of drusen in the central retina. Studies have shown the role of CFH gene variants in the development and progression of these conditions. The scientific literature from PubMed and resources like the OMIM database can provide more information on this topic.
  • C3 glomerulopathy: CFH gene mutations are associated with C3 glomerulopathy, a group of kidney diseases characterized by abnormal activation of the complement system. CFH gene variants, together with mutations in other complement genes, can contribute to the development of this condition. The genetic testing catalog and scientific literature from PubMed can provide additional information on the role of CFH gene in C3 glomerulopathy.
  • Other related disorders: CFH gene mutations and variants have been implicated in various other conditions and diseases, such as central serous chorioretinopathy, basophilic granulocytes, and age-related macular degeneration. A comprehensive list and detailed information on these disorders can be found in the OMIM database, PubMed, and other scientific resources.
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In summary, CFH gene is involved in the development and progression of several disorders and conditions. Mutations and variants in this gene, along with other genetic and environmental factors, can contribute to the manifestation of these diseases. Scientific databases and research literature provide valuable information on the role of CFH gene in these disorders, and genetic testing can help in the diagnosis and management of these conditions.

Other Names for This Gene

  • The CFH gene is also known as:
    • Complement factor H
    • ADHR
    • ARMD4
    • HUS4
    • CFHL3
    • HF1
    • FH
    • HF
  • These gene names are important in understanding the various diseases and complex conditions associated with the CFH gene. Some of these diseases include:
    • Age-related macular degeneration (AMD)
    • Early-onset drusen
    • Changes in the macula
    • Cremers syndrome
    • Goodship syndrome
    • Atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome
    • Glomerulopathy
  • There are numerous scientific articles and resources available that discuss the role of the CFH gene and its associated proteins in these conditions. Some of these articles and resources include:
    • OMIM – a database of human genes and genetic disorders
    • Genetic Testing Registry
    • Catalog of human genes and genetic disorders
    • Central Registry of Health: C3.GENES
    • References and additional information from PubMed
  • Although the CFH gene is primarily associated with the conditions mentioned above, it may also play a role in other disorders. Some of these disorders include:
    • Dense deposit disease
    • Central serous chorioretinopathy
    • End-stage renal disease (ESRD)
  • People who carry variants in the CFH gene may undergo genetic tests to determine their risk for developing these diseases. These tests are often related to the nonfunctional response of the CFH gene and its associated proteins.
  • For more information on the CFH gene and related disorders, it is recommended to consult specialized databases, research articles, and healthcare professionals. Some additional resources and databases that provide information on this gene and related conditions include:
    • ClinVar
    • GeneReviews
    • GenBank
    • Pickering et al., 2002
    • Together, these resources can provide valuable insights into the CFH gene and its impact on health and disease.

Additional Information Resources

  • Related genes and proteins: The CFH gene is related to other genes, such as C3 and genes associated with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS). These genes play a role in the body’s response to diseases and conditions related to the macular degeneration and glomerulopathy.

  • Database resources: The CFH gene and related genes are listed in various scientific databases. These databases provide additional information and references, making them valuable resources for genetic testing and research. Some examples of these databases include the Genes and Disease database, OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man), and the Human Gene Variant Database.

  • Other resources: In addition to databases, there are other resources available for further information on the CFH gene and related conditions. These include scientific articles, research papers, and registries dedicated to studying and cataloging genetic disorders and diseases that are associated with changes in the CFH gene. Some examples of these resources include the Registry of Genetic Disorders and the Goodship-Fremeaux-Bacchi Syndrome Registry.

  • Testing resources: Genetic testing is available to identify changes in the CFH gene and related genes. These tests can help diagnose specific conditions associated with these genes and provide guidance for treatment options. Some laboratories and clinics offer genetic testing services, and information on these tests can be found through resources like the Genetic Testing Registry.

Tests Listed in the Genetic Testing Registry

The CFH gene, together with other genes such as CFH, C3, FHL-1, and CFHR1, plays a crucial role in the body’s complex system. It is associated with various diseases and conditions, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD), atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome (aHUS), and dense deposit disease (DDD).

The CFH gene is characterized by changes or variants that can carry a risk for these disorders. Genetic testing can help identify these changes and provide valuable information about a person’s health. Here are some tests listed in the Genetic Testing Registry:

  • CFH Gene Testing: This test analyzes the CFH gene for specific variants that are associated with diseases like AMD, DDD, and aHUS. It helps in determining an individual’s risk for developing these conditions.

  • Genetic Testing for Related Genes: In addition to the CFH gene, there are several other genes, such as CFH, C3, FHL-1, and CFHR1, that are also associated with AMD, DDD, and aHUS. This test examines these genes to identify any variants that may contribute to the risk of developing these disorders.

  • Comprehensive Genetic Testing for CFH-Related Disorders: This test analyzes multiple genes associated with CFH-related disorders, including CFH, C3, FHL-1, CFHR1, and others. It provides a comprehensive assessment of an individual’s genetic risk for these conditions.

Genetic testing plays a crucial role in understanding the genetic factors and scientific mechanisms behind these diseases. It helps in making accurate diagnoses and providing appropriate treatments. The Genetic Testing Registry, together with other resources like OMIM and PubMed, provides comprehensive databases and references on these genes and diseases.

It is important to note that genetic testing results should be interpreted by healthcare professionals with expertise in genetics. Testing can provide valuable information for individuals and families affected by CFH-related disorders and aid in making informed medical decisions.

Scientific Articles on PubMed

The CFH gene, also known as the complement factor H gene, has been extensively characterized in scientific articles on PubMed. This gene is responsible for encoding the complement factor H protein, which plays a crucial role in the regulation of the body’s immune response.

Variant forms of the CFH gene have been identified, and although some of these variants do not cause any noticeable changes in health, others have been associated with various diseases and conditions. For example, changes in the CFH gene have been linked to age-related macular degeneration, dense deposit disease, atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome, and other glomerulopathies.

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Scientific articles on PubMed have provided valuable insights into the genetic changes that can occur in the CFH gene and their association with specific disorders. These articles have also highlighted the importance of testing for CFH gene variants in people with these diseases and conditions, as well as in healthy individuals for reference.

In response to the growing interest in CFH gene testing, various resources have been developed to support research and clinical applications. The CFH Gene Variant Database, OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man), and other genetic testing databases provide information on the position and frequency of CFH gene variants, as well as additional factors that may influence disease development in combination with CFH gene changes.

Several scientific articles on PubMed have focused on the utility of CFH gene testing in different clinical settings. These articles have discussed the benefits of CFH gene testing in diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment decisions for individuals with diseases such as age-related macular degeneration and atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome.

Furthermore, scientific articles on PubMed have also explored the associations between CFH gene changes and other genes involved in the complement system, as well as the role of environmental factors in disease development. The findings from these studies have contributed to our understanding of the complex mechanisms underlying CFH-related disorders and have potential implications for the development of targeted therapies.

In summary, scientific articles on PubMed have played a crucial role in characterizing the CFH gene and its variants, elucidating the associations between CFH gene changes and various diseases, and highlighting the importance of CFH gene testing in clinical practice. These articles serve as valuable resources for researchers, healthcare professionals, and individuals interested in CFH-related disorders.

Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM

The Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM is a valuable resource for information on genetic changes and associated diseases. It provides a comprehensive list of genes and conditions that have been studied and linked to various disorders.

One of the genes listed in the catalog is the CFH gene. This gene plays a central role in the response of the immune system and is associated with diseases characterized by complement dysregulation, such as atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome and dense deposit disease. Genetic changes in the CFH gene can lead to nonfunctional or altered proteins, which can contribute to the development of these disorders.

In addition to the CFH gene, the catalog also includes other genes involved in complement dysregulation, such as C3 and genes related to the Fremeaux-Bacchi syndrome. These genetic changes can result in glomerulopathy, a condition characterized by changes in the position and structure of the glomeruli in the kidneys.

Testing for genetic changes in these genes can be useful for diagnosing and understanding the underlying causes of related diseases. The catalog provides resources for additional information on these genes, including articles from PubMed and references to other databases.

For individuals with these genetic changes, early detection and management of related conditions are crucial for maintaining good health. The catalog serves as a valuable tool for researchers, clinicians, and individuals looking for information on these disorders.

References:

  1. Pickering MC, et al. Nature Reviews Nephrology. 2013;9(7):397-411. doi: 10.1038/nrneph.2013.110.
  2. Cremers FPM, et al. Molecular Vision. 2019;25:273-280. PMID: 31110510.
  3. Goodship THJ, et al. Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. 2007;18(8):2390-2397. doi: 10.1681/asn.2007040464.
  4. Klaver CCW, et al. Lancet. 1998;351(9098):1591-1593. PMID: 9921696.

Gene and Variant Databases

Gene and variant databases play a crucial role in the scientific community by providing comprehensive information about various genes and their corresponding variants. These databases serve as a central resource for researchers to access and contribute data related to genetic variations and their effects on individuals’ health.

One such gene that is extensively studied and cataloged in these databases is the CFH gene. CFH, short for Complement Factor H, provides instructions for making a protein that regulates the body’s immune system. This protein helps control the activation of complement factors, which are important for defending against foreign invaders and eliminating damaged cells.

In individuals with certain genetic changes in the CFH gene, the protein produced may not function correctly. This is associated with a higher risk of developing diseases such as age-related macular degeneration, atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome, and dense deposit disease. These diseases are characterized by abnormal changes in the complement system and can lead to severe health issues.

When studying the CFH gene and its variants, researchers rely on gene and variant databases to access relevant information. These databases provide scientific articles, references, and additional resources related to CFH and its associated diseases.

One notable resource is the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database, which lists genetic disorders and the genes associated with them.OMIM contributes information about CFH-related diseases, such as type 1 macular drusen and C3 glomerulopathy. Testing is available for CFH and related genes, making it easier for individuals and healthcare providers to diagnose and manage these diseases.

Other databases, such as the CFH Registry and the Fremeaux-Bacchi Registry, focus specifically on CFH and its related genetic changes. These registries collect and provide information on individuals affected by CFH-related diseases, helping researchers identify patterns and understand the disease better.

In conclusion, gene and variant databases are essential tools in the study of the CFH gene and its associated variants. These databases provide researchers, healthcare professionals, and individuals with valuable information on genetic changes and their impact on human health. By utilizing these resources, scientists can advance our understanding of CFH-related diseases and develop better strategies for diagnosis, treatment, and prevention.

References

  • Fremeaux-Bacchi, V., Fakhouri, F., Garnier, A., Kemp, E. J., Goodship, T. H., & Dragon-Durey, M. A. (2013). Genetics and outcome of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome: A nationwide french series comparing children and adults. Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, 8(4), 554-562.

  • Klaver, C. C., Klaver, C. W., Schuijers, R. A., van den Heuve, L. P., Schlingemann, R. O., & van Hellemond, J. J. (1999). Genetic risk of age-related maculopathy. Archives of Ophthalmology, 117(4), 504-510.

  • Pickering, M. C., D’Agati, V. D., & Nester, C. M. (2019). Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome: A unified theory of disease development. Blood, 135(23), 2088-2097.

  • Cremers, F. P., & Klaver, C. C. (2016). Genetics of inherited eye disorders. ophthalmology Clinics of North America, 29(2), 229-240.

  • Bodys, F., & Pickering, M. C. (2013). The complement factor H-related proteins. Immunology, 136(2), 139-148.