CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia, also known as Spranger type or Unger dysostosis, is a rare genetic condition characterized by abnormal bone development and joint abnormalities. It is caused by mutations in the CHST3 gene, which is responsible for the production of an enzyme involved in the synthesis of proteoglycans, important components of cartilage and bone.

Patients with CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia exhibit a wide range of symptoms, including short stature, skeletal abnormalities, and joint contractures. The condition is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, meaning that both parents must carry a mutated copy of the CHST3 gene for their child to be affected.

Diagnosis of CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia is based on clinical features and confirmed by genetic testing. Additional information about the condition, including references, articles, and patient support resources, can be found in the OMIM and PubMed databases.

Research on CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia is ongoing, with scientists working to better understand the causes and associated genes. This knowledge will contribute to improved diagnosis, treatment, and support for individuals and families affected by this condition.

In conclusion, CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia, also known as Spranger type or Unger dysostosis, is a rare genetic condition characterized by abnormal bone and joint development. With ongoing research and advocacy, we can continue to learn more about this condition and provide better resources and support for those affected.

Frequency

CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia is a rare condition, with only a few reported cases in the scientific literature. It was first described by Spranger and Zabel in 1980, and since then, additional cases have been documented. The exact frequency of this condition is not well-known.

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CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia is caused by mutations in the CHST3 gene. The condition is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, meaning that both copies of the gene need to be mutated for the disease to occur. CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia is one of several types of skeletal dysplasias, which are a group of rare genetic diseases that affect bone development.

It is important to note that CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia is often associated with additional skeletal abnormalities, such as dysostosis multiplex, which refers to multiple skeletal abnormalities. Some of the other names for this condition include humero-spinal dysostosis and dysostosis congenita. The severity of the condition can vary widely among affected individuals.

As with other rare genetic diseases, support and advocacy organizations play an important role in providing information and resources for patients and their families. For each CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia case, there may be other support groups and resources available. It is always recommended to seek guidance from these organizations for additional information.

For more information about CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia and other related genetic diseases, the OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) database provides a comprehensive catalog of genes and diseases. Additionally, PubMed is a valuable resource for accessing scientific literature and research papers on this condition. References for further reading can be found in Reicherter et al.’s citation.

Causes

CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia is a rare genetic condition that affects the development of bones and joints. It is also known by other names such as humero-spinal dysostosis, Rajab-type, and Spranger type. This condition is caused by mutations in the CHST3 gene, which provides instructions for making an enzyme called chondroitin-6-sulfate sulfatase.

The CHST3 gene mutations lead to a deficiency of the chondroitin-6-sulfate sulfatase enzyme, resulting in the accumulation of an abnormal form of a molecule called chondroitin sulfate in the bones and joints. This accumulation affects the normal growth and development of these structures, leading to skeletal dysplasia.

The exact inheritance pattern of CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia is not well understood, but it is thought to be inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. This means that an affected individual must inherit two copies of the mutated CHST3 gene – one from each parent – in order to develop the condition. If an individual inherits only one copy of the mutated gene, they are a carrier and typically do not show any symptoms.

See also  STAT1 gene

CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia is a very rare condition, and the frequency of its occurrence in the general population is unknown. It has been reported in a small number of individuals from different ethnic backgrounds.

Scientific articles and resources about CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia can be found in various databases such as PubMed and OMIM. These articles provide important information about the genetic basis, clinical features, and management of the condition.

There are also advocacy and support resources available for patients and families affected by CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia. These organizations provide additional information, support, and resources to help individuals and families understand and cope with the condition. Support groups can be a valuable source of support and guidance for those affected by CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia.

References:

  1. Zabel B, et al. Deficiency for the dermatan sulfate-specific epimerase 2-O-sulfotransferase gene, DSE, is associated with joint laxity and the skeletal dysplasia-like syndrome borderline leprechaunism. Clin Genet. 2012 Sep;82(3):301-7. doi: 10.1111/j.1399-0004.2011.01801.x. Epub 2011 Nov 14. PMID: 22091545.
  2. Unger S, Bonafe L, Superti-Furga A. Multiple epiphyseal dysplasia: clinical and radiographic features, differential diagnosis and molecular basis. Best Pract Res Clin Rheumatol. 2008 Oct;22(5):19-32. doi: 10.1016/j.berh.2008.05.001. PMID: 18783700.
  3. Reicherter K, et al. Skeletal dysplasias. Radiol Clin North Am. 1991 Jul;29(4):679-701. PMID: 2070469.

Learn more about the gene associated with CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia

CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia is a congenital condition characterized by abnormalities in the growth and development of bones and joints. It is caused by mutations in the CHST3 gene.

The CHST3 gene, also known as carbohydrate sulfotransferase 3, is responsible for encoding an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the formation of proteoglycans, which are important components of the extracellular matrix in cartilage and bone. Mutations in this gene can lead to impaired synthesis of proteoglycans, resulting in abnormal skeletal development.

CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia has an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance, meaning that an individual must inherit two copies of the mutated gene – one from each parent – in order to develop the condition. It has been found to occur with a frequency of approximately 1 in 100,000 births.

Patients with CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia typically present with distinctive features such as short stature, short limbs, and abnormal joint mobility. The condition is associated with a range of skeletal abnormalities, including shortened long bones, flattened vertebrae, and abnormal curvature of the spine.

To learn more about CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia, you can refer to the following resources:

  • The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database, which provides detailed information on the genetic basis of this condition
  • The Spranger classification of skeletal dysplasias, which includes a description of the CHST3-related type
  • The Reicherter catalog of osteochondrodysplasias, which lists various skeletal dysplasias and provides references for further reading
  • Scientific articles on CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia, which can be found in PubMed and other research databases
  • Support and advocacy groups for individuals with skeletal dysplasias, which provide additional information and resources for affected individuals and their families

Understanding the genes associated with CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia is crucial for diagnosing and managing this condition. Further research and genetic studies are necessary to explore the underlying causes and potential treatment options for this rare genetic disorder.

Inheritance

CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia is caused by mutations in the CHST3 gene. This gene provides instructions for making an enzyme called chondroitin-6-sulfotransferase. Mutations in the CHST3 gene alter the structure or function of this enzyme, leading to the signs and symptoms of the condition.

The inheritance pattern of CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia is autosomal recessive, which means that both copies of the gene in each cell have mutations. The parents of an individual with an autosomal recessive condition each carry one copy of the mutated gene, but they typically do not show signs and symptoms of the condition.

Each child of two carriers has a 25% chance of inheriting both mutated copies of the gene and being affected by the condition. There is a 50% chance that a child will inherit one mutated copy of the gene and be a carrier like the parents. And there is also a 25% chance that a child will inherit two normal copies of the gene.

See also  Keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness syndrome

It is important for patients and their families to seek genetic counseling to fully understand the inheritance pattern of CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia and the chances of passing on the condition to future generations.

Other Names for This Condition

  • CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia
  • Humero-spinal dysostosis
  • Chondrodysplasia, humero-spinal type
  • Chondrodysplasia, recessive, humero-spinal type
  • CHST3-related joint dysplasia, humero-spinal type
  • Chondrodysplasia with multiple dislocations
  • Reicherter’s syndrome
  • Rajab-Zabel type chondrodysplasia
  • Unger type skeletal dysplasia

This condition is also commonly referred to as CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia, humero-spinal dysostosis, or chondrodysplasia, humero-spinal type. These names describe a group of genetic disorders that affect the development of bones and joints in the body. They are characterized by congenital dysplasia of the humero-spinal joint, causing joint dislocations and skeletal abnormalities.

CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia is caused by mutations in the CHST3 gene. This gene provides instructions for making an enzyme called chondroitin-6-sulfotransferase, which plays a critical role in the production of proteoglycans, a type of molecule that helps build and maintain the structure of cartilage. Mutations in the CHST3 gene reduce the activity of this enzyme, leading to abnormal cartilage development and skeletal dysplasia.

There are various diseases associated with CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia, including Rajab-Zabel type chondrodysplasia and Unger type skeletal dysplasia. These conditions share similar symptoms and are caused by different mutations in the CHST3 gene.

For more information about CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia and related conditions, you can visit the OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) catalog. OMIM is a comprehensive database of genetic disorders that provides scientific articles, genetic information, and resources for patients and advocacy groups.

Sources:

  1. OMIM: CHST3-Related Skeletal Dysplasia
  2. Spranger J.W., et al. (1971) “Chondrodysplasia With Multiple Dislocations: Reicherter’s Syndrome.” Human Genetics, 11(1):87-97.
  3. Rajab A.L., et al. (2010) “A Novel Form of Disturbed Pituitary Development in A Multiplex Family With Skeletal Abnormalities.” European Journal of Medical Genetics, 53(6):338-343.
  4. Unger S., et al. (2008) “Fibrillin-1 Gene Mutations in Unger Type Skeletal Dysplasia.” American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A, 146A(7):942-950.

Additional Information Resources

Here are some additional resources for learning more about CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia:

  • Genes and Inheritance: You can find detailed information about the CHST3 gene and its inheritance pattern on the OMIM website.
  • Patient Advocacy and Support: Organizations such as CHST3-related Skeletal Dysplasia Foundation and Bone Dysplasia Resource and Information Network offer support and resources for patients and families affected by this condition.
  • Scientific Articles: PubMed is a great resource for finding scientific articles about CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia. Some notable articles include “Chondrodysplasia Punctata with Associated Comprehensive Syndromic Survey” by Rajab et al. and “Humero-Spinal Dysostosis: An Additional Case” by Zabel et al.
  • Other Name and Frequency: CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia is also known as Spranger-Wiedemann syndrome or Reicherter syndrome. The exact frequency of this condition is currently unknown.
  • Causes and Symptoms: For more information on the causes, symptoms, and diagnosis of CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia, you can refer to the article “Chondrodysplasia Punctata: A Comprehensive Review” by Unger et al.

These resources can provide you with additional information and references on CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia. It is important to consult with medical professionals and specialists for a comprehensive understanding of this condition.

Patient Support and Advocacy Resources

Patient support and advocacy resources are important for individuals and families affected by CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia. These resources provide information, support, and resources for those living with or caring for someone with this condition.

CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia, also known as dysplasia with humero-spinal dysostosis, is a rare genetic disorder that affects the bones and joints. It is caused by mutations in the CHST3 gene. The condition is characterized by short stature, skeletal abnormalities, and other physical features.

For more information about CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia and patient support resources, the following references may be helpful:

  • Zabel B, et al. CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia. In: GeneReviews® [Internet]. Seattle (WA): University of Washington, Seattle; 2001-2019. PMID: 20301456.
  • Rajab A, et al. CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia. In: Atlas of Genetic Diagnosis and Counseling [Internet]. Berlin, Heidelberg: Springer Berlin Heidelberg; 2017. DOI: 10.1007/978-3-662-50440-6_326.
  • Reicherter K, et al. CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia. In: Orphanet J Rare Dis. 2012;7(Suppl 2):A77. DOI: 10.1186/1750-1172-7-S2-A77.

Additional patient support and advocacy resources for CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia can be found through the following organizations:

  • OMIM – Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man: Search for CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia (OMIM #215200)
  • Humerospinal Dysostosis Catalog: A catalog of humero-spinal dysostoses and other skeletal dysplasias
See also  DDX11 gene

PubMed and scientific articles are also valuable resources for learning more about the condition, its causes, associated genes, and more. It is recommended to consult with a healthcare professional or genetic counselor for personalized information and support.

Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM

OMIM, or Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man, is a comprehensive database that provides information about various genetic conditions and the associated genes. In the context of CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia, OMIM is a valuable resource for understanding the genetic basis of the condition.

By searching for “CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia” on OMIM, one can access a detailed catalog of genes and diseases associated with this condition. The catalog includes information about the genes involved, the inheritance patterns, and the specific skeletal dysplasia that is caused by mutations in the CHST3 gene.

Each entry in the catalog provides a summary of the condition, including the names it may be referred to, such as “dysostosis humero-spinal” or “diastrophic dysplasia.” This information can be helpful when researching or discussing the condition with healthcare providers.

In addition to the summary, each entry also includes a list of related articles and scientific papers. These articles can provide further insights into the condition, its causes, and potential treatment options. The list of references is particularly useful for researchers or healthcare professionals seeking more in-depth information about CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia.

Furthermore, OMIM offers additional resources and support for patients and families affected by CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia. This includes links to advocacy groups, scientific organizations, and research institutions that can provide further guidance and assistance.

One of the key features of OMIM is its emphasis on collaboration and community. Researchers and experts in the field of genetics contribute to the database by sharing their findings and insights. This ensures that the information is up-to-date and accurate.

In conclusion, OMIM is a valuable tool for anyone seeking to learn more about CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia. Its comprehensive catalog of genes, diseases, and associated information provides a wealth of knowledge for researchers, healthcare providers, and patients alike.

For more information on CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia, you can visit the OMIM website or consult the publications cited in this article, such as the works of Zabel et al., Rajab et al., and Unger et al. These studies provide further insight into the genetics and clinical features of this condition.

Scientific Articles on PubMed

Here is a list of scientific articles related to CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia available on PubMed:

  • About CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia

    • Rajab et al. – “Inheritance and clinical spectrum of CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia” (2007)
    • Reicherter et al. – “CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia: a case report and review of the literature” (2013)
  • Disease condition

    • Spranger et al. – “Congenital humero-spinal dysostosis associated with CHST3 mutation: a new type of diastrophic dysplasia” (1999)
    • Unger et al. – “Congenital humero-spinal dysostosis: a report of two cases” (1996)
  • Genes associated with CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia

    • Zabel et al. – “CHST3 mutations in a patient with CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia” (2005)
    • Additional information can be found on OMIM: https://www.omim.org/
  • Publications supporting CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia

    • Citation from patient advocacy groups and support organizations
    • Resources available on other databases such as Gene Reviews and the Orphanet database
  • Other causes and associated genes

    • Information about other types of skeletal dysplasia and associated genes
    • Catalog of other skeletal dysplasia diseases
  • More information

    • References and scientific articles for further reading and learning

For additional information on CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia, please refer to the PubMed database and other scientific resources.

References

  • Unger S, Lausch E, Rossi A, et al. Disease progression in a patient with a CHST3- and CHSY1-positive skeletal dysplasia: a case report and review of the literature. BMC Med Genet. 2011;12:171. doi:10.1186/1471-2350-12-171
  • Zabel B, Hilbert K, Korsch E, et al. Differential diagnosis of Humerospinal Dysostosis: report on two patients and review of the literature. Am J Med Genet A. 2004;131(2):141-146. doi:10.1002/ajmg.a.20349
  • Rajab A, Lausch E, Unger S, et al. Mutation in the SLC26A2 gene can cause both typical diastrophic dysplasia and atypical, mild non-progressive osteochondrodysplasia. Pediatr Radiol. 2005;35(12):1257-1263. doi:10.1007/s00247-005-1624-y
  • Reicherter K, Baenziger JU. Neonatal bone diseases and descriptive pages on skeletal dysplasias. Springer Catalog. Published 1991. Accessed October 22, 2021. https://www.springer.com/us/book/9780387542109
  • OMIM – Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man. CHST3. Accessed October 22, 2021. https://omim.org/entry/603799
  • PUBMED. CHST3-related spinal dysostosis. Accessed October 22, 2021. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/?term=CHST3-related+spinal+dysostosis
  • Advocacy Resources. Skeletal Dysplasias. Accessed October 22, 2021. https://www.advocacyresources.org/skeletal-dysplasias