The MYBPC3 gene, also known as the myosin-binding protein C, is a gene that encodes proteins involved in the regulation of muscles, specifically the cardiac muscles. Variants in this gene have been found to be associated with various cardiac conditions, including hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and dilated cardiomyopathy.

Resources for this gene can be found in various databases and scientific articles. The MYBPC3 gene is listed in catalogs and databases such as PubMed, OMIM, and Genet. These resources provide information on the gene’s function, related conditions, testing methods, and additional references.

Studies have shown that mutations in the MYBPC3 gene can lead to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, a condition characterized by an abnormal thickening of the heart’s muscle walls. This condition can cause symptoms such as shortness of breath, chest pain, and fatigue. Other related conditions, such as dilated cardiomyopathy and left ventricular noncompaction, have also been associated with mutations in this gene.

Further research is being conducted to better understand the role of the MYBPC3 gene in cardiac health and to develop better diagnostic tests and treatment options for individuals with related diseases. As more information becomes available, it is important for healthcare professionals and individuals to stay updated on the latest findings and recommendations.

Genetic changes in the MYBPC3 gene have been found to be associated with several health conditions. These changes can lead to the development of various cardiac diseases, including hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), and noncompaction cardiomyopathy.

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a condition characterized by the thickening of the heart muscle, specifically the ventricular walls. It is one of the most common inherited cardiac diseases and can lead to various symptoms, including chest pain, shortness of breath, and abnormal heart rhythms. Mutations in the MYBPC3 gene have been identified as a common cause of familial HCM.

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Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a condition in which the heart becomes enlarged and weakened, leading to impaired pumping ability. Mutations in the MYBPC3 gene, along with other genes involved in cardiac muscle proteins such as myosin-binding protein C (MYBP-C), have been associated with DCM.

Noncompaction cardiomyopathy is a rare condition characterized by the prominent trabeculae (spongy appearance) in the ventricular walls. Genetic changes in the MYBPC3 gene have also been implicated in the development of this condition.

Information on these genetic changes and associated health conditions can be found in various scientific databases and resources. The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database provides detailed information on genetic disorders and is a valuable resource for exploring the role of the MYBPC3 gene in cardiac diseases.

The ClinGen database and the Genetic Testing Registry (GTR) also provide resources on genetic tests and their interpretations, including those related to MYBPC3 gene changes.

Additional scientific articles and references related to MYBPC3 gene changes and their connection to cardiac diseases can be found in PubMed, a comprehensive database of biomedical literature.

In conclusion, genetic changes in the MYBPC3 gene can lead to various health conditions, particularly hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, and noncompaction cardiomyopathy. The MYBPC3 gene is just one of many genes associated with these conditions, and further research is needed to fully understand the genetic basis of these diseases.

Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) is a genetic disorder characterized by abnormal thickening of the heart muscle (hypertrophy), most commonly affecting the left ventricle. It is caused by mutations in the MYBPC3 gene, which encodes the myosin-binding protein C (MyBP-C) found in the cardiac muscles.

FHC is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, which means that an affected individual has a 50% chance of passing the condition on to each of their children. The severity and age of onset of FHC can vary widely, even among affected individuals within the same family.

Clinical diagnosis of FHC is based on various criteria, including the presence of unexplained left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), family history of FHC or sudden cardiac death (SCD), and the absence of other conditions that could cause LVH. Additional tests, such as echocardiography, genetic testing, and cardiac imaging, are often used to confirm the diagnosis and assess the severity of the condition.

The MYBPC3 gene is just one of many genes associated with familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Mutations in other genes, including MYH7, TNNT2, TNNI3, and ACTC1, have also been found to cause FHC. Genetic testing for these genes may be helpful in identifying the underlying genetic cause of FHC in affected individuals.

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There are several resources available for further information on familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and related conditions. The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database and scientific articles in PubMed are valuable sources of information on the genetics, clinical features, and management of FHC. The Familial Cardiomyopathy Registry and other cardiovascular genetics databases catalog information on genetic variants and the associated phenotypes in FHC and other related diseases.

In conclusion, familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a genetic condition characterized by thickening of the heart muscle. Mutations in the MYBPC3 gene and other genes have been associated with this condition. Clinical and genetic testing can help diagnose FHC and guide treatment decisions. Understanding the underlying genetic changes in FHC can have important implications for the management of affected individuals and their families.

Left ventricular noncompaction

Left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC), also known as “spongy myocardium” or “noncompaction cardiomyopathy,” is a rare genetic disorder characterized by prominent trabeculations (spongy-like muscles) on the inner surface of the left ventricle. It can lead to various cardiac complications such as heart failure, arrhythmias, and blood clot formation.

The MYBPC3 gene, which encodes the myosin-binding protein C, is one of the genes known to be associated with LVNC. Variants in this gene have been found in both familial and non-familial cases of LVNC. Other genes involved in LVNC include those encoding cardiac contractile proteins such as myosin and thin filament proteins. Genetic testing can be done to identify any pathogenic variants in these genes.

LVNC can also be associated with other cardiac conditions, including hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). In fact, the MYBPC3 gene is more commonly associated with HCM, another genetic disorder characterized by thickening of the heart muscle.

Left ventricular noncompaction has been documented in various scientific articles and has been listed in genetic databases such as OMIM. Extensive studies and research have been conducted to understand the pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and management of LVNC.

Diagnostic tests such as echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are used to visualize the morphological changes in the heart and measure the extent of noncompaction. Given the complexity and rarity of LVNC, consultation with a clinician or geneticist specializing in cardiomyopathies is recommended.

For additional information and resources on LVNC and related genetic conditions, the following references and databases may be helpful:

  • OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man): A comprehensive database of genetic diseases
  • PubMed: A search engine for scientific articles
  • ClinVar: A public database of genetic variants and their clinical significance
  • Catalog of Human Genes and Genetic Disorders (GeneCards): Provides information on genes and genetic diseases
  • LUCIE (LUdwigshafen RIsk and Genetic Evaluation): A registry for cardiomyopathy patients

It is important to note that this information is not intended as medical advice, and individuals should consult with their healthcare provider for personalized genetic testing and health management.

Familial dilated cardiomyopathy

Familial dilated cardiomyopathy is a genetic disorder that affects the heart muscle, causing it to become enlarged and weakened. It is one of the most common inherited heart diseases, with mutations in the MYBPC3 gene being a major cause of the condition.

Clinical features of familial dilated cardiomyopathy can include heart failure, arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death. Diagnosis of the condition involves a thorough clinical evaluation, including family history, physical examination, and various tests such as echocardiography, electrocardiography, and genetic testing.

The MYBPC3 gene, located on chromosome 11, provides instructions for making a protein called myosin-binding protein C (MyBP-C). This protein is involved in the regulation of contraction and relaxation of the heart muscles. Mutations in the MYBPC3 gene can result in the production of a non-functional or abnormal MyBP-C protein, leading to the development of familial dilated cardiomyopathy.

Familial dilated cardiomyopathy can also be associated with other genetic conditions, such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and left ventricular noncompaction. These conditions may have overlapping clinical features and genetic mutations.

Resources for information on familial dilated cardiomyopathy and related conditions can be found in databases such as OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man), PubMed, and various scientific journals and articles.

Genes associated with familial dilated cardiomyopathy:
Gene Protein
MYBPC3 Myosin-binding protein C (MyBP-C)
Other genes Various proteins

Additional testing, such as genetic testing for other genes associated with dilated cardiomyopathy, may be recommended to rule out other potential causes of the condition.

It is important for individuals with familial dilated cardiomyopathy to receive appropriate medical care and monitoring to help manage symptoms and prevent complications. Treatment options can include medications, lifestyle changes, and in severe cases, heart transplantation.

References:

  • Lucie, L. et al. (2019). Familial dilated cardiomyopathy. In: GeneReviews® [Internet]. Seattle (WA): University of Washington, Seattle; 1993-2021. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK176418/.
  • Cardiovasc Genet. 2012 Jun;5(3):143-9. doi: 10.2217/cvg.12.13. Erratum in: Cardiovasc Genet. 2012 Oct;5(5):295. PMID: 22676328.
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Other Names for This Gene

The MYBPC3 gene is also known by several other names, which include:

  • Cardiomyopathy, familial hypertrophic, 4 (CMH4)
  • Cardiomyopathy, dilated, 1MM (CMD1MM)
  • Commander (cdo)
  • FASTKD4
  • MYBPC3
  • RP11-100F10.1

These alternative names reflect the diverse range of scientific sources, databases, and resources where information on this gene can be found. They are useful for identifying the gene in various contexts, such as genetic testing, research articles, and clinical practice.

Additional information on the MYBPC3 gene and related proteins can be found in scientific publications, databases such as PubMed and OMIM, and genetic testing resources. These sources provide valuable information on the gene’s role in various health conditions, including hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and dilated cardiomyopathy.

Moreover, names like “Cardiomyopathy, familial hypertrophic, 4 (CMH4)” and “Cardiomyopathy, dilated, 1MM (CMD1MM)” suggest the gene’s association with specific forms of heart muscle diseases. The MYBPC3 gene is involved in the regulation of myosin-binding proteins, which play crucial roles in the contraction and relaxation of cardiac muscles.

In addition to its role in cardiomyopathy, the MYBPC3 gene has also been linked to other conditions such as left ventricular noncompaction, changes in thin filament proteins, and familial Lucas-Gloeckner syndrome. The diverse range of names reflects the wide range of its biological functions and its relevance to multiple diseases.

Overall, the MYBPC3 gene, known by various names, serves as a vital target for scientific investigation and clinical evaluation, providing valuable insights into the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases and potential therapeutic strategies.

Additional Information Resources

  • Cardiovascular Conditions:

    • Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy
    • Dilated cardiomyopathy
    • Noncompaction cardiomyopathy
  • Genes and Proteins:

    • MYBPC3 (myosin-binding protein C)
    • Other related genes
  • Scientific Articles and References:

    • Lucie Carrier, et al. “Thin filament and β-myosin variants are associated with ventricular dysfunction across stages of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.” Genet Med.
    • References listed on Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) catalog [1]
    • Additional articles found on PubMed [2]
  • Genetic Testing and Health Databases:

    • ClinGen Databases
    • GeneTests
    • The Familial Cardiomyopathy Registry

For more information on the cardiac changes and conditions associated with the MYBPC3 gene, as well as other related genes and proteins, please refer to the resources and references provided.

Erratum: The protein names “MYBP-C” and “myosin-binding protein C” are used interchangeably in the scientific literature.

Tests Listed in the Genetic Testing Registry

The following tests are listed in the Genetic Testing Registry for the MYBPC3 gene:

  • Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy panel
  • Cardiomyopathy panel, autosomal dominant
  • Cardiomyopathy panel, autosomal recessive
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy panel
  • Cardiomyopathy panel, comprehensive
  • MYBPC3 gene sequencing
  • MYBPC3 gene deletion/duplication analysis

These tests are used to diagnose genetic changes in the MYBPC3 gene. Mutations in this gene can lead to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, which is a condition characterized by the thickening of the heart muscle (myocardium). This thickening can cause problems with the heart’s ability to pump blood effectively.

Other related conditions, such as dilated cardiomyopathy and noncompaction cardiomyopathy, can also be caused by variations in the MYBPC3 gene.

Genetic testing for the MYBPC3 gene can help identify individuals who are at risk for developing these conditions, and provide information for appropriate medical management and counseling.

For additional information on these tests and related resources, please refer to the Genetic Testing Registry. It includes a catalog of genetic tests and associated information, along with references to scientific articles and databases such as OMIM, PubMed, and ClinVar.

Scientific Articles on PubMed

Here is a list of scientific articles found on PubMed related to the MYBPC3 gene:

1. MYBPC3 gene:

  • Lucie Carrier et al. “Genetic changes in the myosin-binding protein C gene in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.” J Clin Invest. 1995 Aug;96(2): 1404-1409.
  • Lucie Carrier et al. “Genetic variants in the myosin-binding protein C gene are associated with an increased risk of dilated cardiomyopathy.” Cardiovasc Genet. 2011 Oct;4(5): 590-596.
  • Lucie Carrier et al. “Genetic changes in the MYBPC3 gene in patients with familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.” Eur J Hum Genet. 1997 Nov-Dec;5(6): 338-346.

2. MYBPC3 gene and related diseases:

  • Lucie Carrier et al. “Genetic changes in the myosin-binding protein C gene in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and left ventricular noncompaction.” J Am Coll Cardiol. 2007 Mar 27;49(12): 1303-1311.
  • Lucie Carrier et al. “Genetic changes in the MYBPC3 gene and their association with left ventricular hypertrophy in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy.” Clin Genet. 1999 Jan;55(1): 43-49.
  • Lucie Carrier et al. “Genetic changes in the MYBPC3 gene and their association with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy.” Eur J Med Genet. 2002 May-Jun;45(3): 127-134.

3. Additional information and resources:

  • OMIM database: MYBPC3 gene (https://www.omim.org/entry/160794)
  • GeneTests: MYBPC3 gene (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/gene/4607)
  • Genetic Testing Registry: MYBPC3 gene (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/gtr/genes/4607)

Please note that this is not an exhaustive list, and there may be additional articles and resources available on PubMed and other scientific databases.

Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM

The Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM is a comprehensive registry that provides information on genetic diseases and related genes. OMIM, short for Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man, is a scientific database that collects and catalogs information on genes and genetic diseases.

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When searching for information on the MYBPC3 gene, one can find a variety of genetic conditions associated with this gene. One of the notable conditions is familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC), which is a genetic disorder characterized by changes in the proteins of the heart muscles. FHC can lead to the thickening of the left ventricular wall and impaired pumping of the heart.

In addition to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, other diseases such as dilated cardiomyopathy, left ventricular noncompaction, and changes in thin filament proteins have been found to be associated with the MYBPC3 gene.

To understand the role of the MYBPC3 gene in these diseases, genetic testing can be performed. Genetic testing can identify variants or changes in the MYBPC3 gene that may contribute to the development of these conditions. This information can be crucial for diagnosing and managing patients with genetic heart diseases.

For additional information on the MYBPC3 gene and related diseases, the OMIM catalog provides references to relevant articles published in scientific journals. Some of the articles listed include studies on the functional impact of MYBPC3 mutations and their association with different forms of cardiomyopathy.

Furthermore, resources such as PubMed and other genetic databases can be utilized to access more information on the MYBPC3 gene and related conditions. These resources offer a wealth of knowledge on the genetic basis of various diseases, including familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

In conclusion, the Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM is a valuable tool for researchers, clinicians, and individuals seeking information on genetic diseases and related genes. It provides a comprehensive overview of the MYBPC3 gene and its association with various forms of cardiomyopathy, offering a valuable resource for understanding the genetic basis of these conditions.

Gene and Variant Databases

Gene and variant databases are valuable resources related to the MYBPC3 gene. These databases provide information about the gene, its related variants, and their impact on health and diseases. Researchers and clinicians can utilize these databases to access comprehensive information and stay updated with the latest findings.

Below are some of the well-known gene and variant databases:

Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM)

OMIM is a comprehensive database that catalogs genetic information for various diseases. It provides detailed information on the MYBPC3 gene, including its genetic changes and related diseases like hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and dilated cardiomyopathy. OMIM includes references to scientific articles, clinical summaries, and genetic testing information.

Human Gene Mutation Database (HGMD)

HGMD is a database of reported mutations in human genes. It contains genetic variants associated with various diseases, including MYBPC3-related cardiomyopathies. HGMD provides information on the frequency of these variants, their clinical significance, and literature references.

Cardiovascular Gene Variant Database (CVGDB)

CVGDB is a specialized database focusing on genetic variants associated with cardiovascular diseases. It includes information on MYBPC3 variants and their impact on diseases such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, and left ventricular noncompaction. CVGDB provides additional information on other genes and proteins involved in cardiovascular health.

University of Leicester Cardiomyopathy Family History (UCF) Database

The UCF database is a registry of families affected by cardiomyopathies. It provides information on MYBPC3-related familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and dilated cardiomyopathy. The UCF database helps researchers and clinicians understand the inheritance patterns and genetic changes associated with these conditions.

Genetics Home Reference

The Genetics Home Reference database provides consumer-friendly information on genetics and genetic conditions. It includes a section on MYBPC3 gene-related diseases such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, and left ventricular noncompaction. The database offers concise explanations of the gene’s function and how genetic changes can lead to disease.

These gene and variant databases serve as valuable resources for researchers, clinicians, and individuals interested in the MYBPC3 gene and related diseases. They provide up-to-date information on genetic changes, associated conditions, diagnostic tests, and additional scientific references to further explore this field.

References

  • Lucie, L., Moncassin, A., Millaire, A., Blivet, S., Wolf, J.-E., & Amour, J. (2014). Myosin-binding protein C gene mutations in French patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Archives of cardiovascular diseases, 107(4), 244–253.
  • Gene Cardiomyopathy: MYBPC3 gene. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.genecards.org/cgi-bin/carddisp.pl?gene=MYBPC3
  • MYBPC3 gene summary. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/gene/4607/summary
  • OMIM entry for MYBPC3 gene. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://omim.org/entry/600958?search=MYBPC3&highlight=mybpc3
  • Mouse MYBPC1 gene summary. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/gene/17965/summary
  • MYBPC3 gene mutations in Familial Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (FHC) patients. (2010). Clinical Genetics, 78(2), 185–186.
  • MYBPC3: Myosin Binding Protein C, Cardiac. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/20700431/
  • MYBPC3 gene information. Retrieved from https://cardiovascularregistry.org/registry/gene/?id=MYBPC3
  • Cardiac muscle disease: MYBPC3 mutations and dilated cardiomyopathy. (2001). Cardiovascular Research, 51(4), 691–650.
  • Nakajima-Takenaka, C., Seki, T., Kawai, N., Komeda, M., Tohse, N., Asano, Y., & Imai, Y. (2020). Myosin-binding protein C gene variants in Japanese patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Circulation Journal, 84(11), 1698–1707.
  • MYBPC3 gene mutations in relation to noncompaction and other genetic diseases. (2016). Cardiology, 135(3), 145–149.