Wagner syndrome is a rare genetic condition that affects vision. It is caused by mutations in the genes associated with vitreoretinopathy, a disorder that affects the back of the eye. The syndrome is named after the German ophthalmologist, Dr. U. Wagner, who first described the condition in the 1930s.

Patients with Wagner syndrome often experience progressive vision problems, including nearsightedness (myopia) and clouding of the lens (cataracts). Other symptoms may include retinal degeneration, abnormal blood vessels in the retina, and detachment of the retina. The severity and age of onset can vary among patients.

Scientists have identified several genes that can cause Wagner syndrome, including the VCAN, COL2A1, and KCNAB2 genes. Genetic testing can confirm a diagnosis and help determine the inheritance pattern of the condition. Some forms of Wagner syndrome have an autosomal dominant inheritance, which means that an affected individual has a 50% chance of passing the mutation on to each of their children.

More information about Wagner syndrome can be found in scientific articles and resources from organizations such as OMIM and PubMed. Genetic advocacy and support groups may also have additional resources and patient information on this condition. The frequency of Wagner syndrome is not well-established, but it is considered to be a rare disease.

Frequency

Wagner syndrome is a rare genetic condition that causes vision problems. The frequency of Wagner syndrome is not well-documented in the scientific literature, but it is considered to be a rare disease.

There are several names associated with this syndrome, including Wagner vitreoretinopathy and erosive vitreoretinopathy. These names refer to the same condition and are used interchangeably in the literature.

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The inheritance pattern of Wagner syndrome is autosomal dominant, which means that a mutation in one copy of the gene is sufficient to cause the condition. The gene associated with Wagner syndrome is the VCAN gene.

Testing for the VCAN gene mutation can be done to confirm a diagnosis of Wagner syndrome in a patient. This genetic testing can also be useful for genetic counseling and for identifying other family members who may be at risk for the condition.

More information on the frequency of Wagner syndrome and its associated gene can be found in the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) catalog. OMIM provides comprehensive information on genetic diseases and their associated genes.

Additional resources for learning more about Wagner syndrome and finding support for individuals and families affected by the condition can be found on advocacy and support group websites. These websites may provide articles, information on clinical trials, and links to scientific publications.

The frequency of Wagner syndrome is rare, but it is important for individuals and families affected by the condition to seek out resources and support. By staying informed and connecting with others, individuals can better understand the causes and management of Wagner syndrome.

References
1. Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM): Wagner Syndrome Available from: https://www.omim.org/entry/143200
2. Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD): Wagner Syndrome Available from: https://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/diseases/4189/wagner-syndrome
3. PubMed Search for articles on Wagner syndrome and VCAN gene.

Causes

Wagner syndrome is a rare genetic condition associated with mutations in the genes VCAN and CSPG2. These genes are responsible for the production of proteins that are essential for the normal structure and function of the vitreous and retina.

Scientific research has shown that mutations in the VCAN and CSPG2 genes can disrupt the normal development and maintenance of the vitreous and retina, leading to the vision problems seen in Wagner syndrome.

Genetic testing can be done to identify these mutations in patients suspected to have Wagner syndrome. This testing can provide important information for diagnosis and proper management of the condition.

It is important to note that Wagner syndrome is a rare genetic disease, and the frequency of these mutations in the general population is low. Genetic testing is usually recommended for individuals with a family history of Wagner syndrome or those who have specific symptoms associated with the condition.

The Wagner Support Group and Wagner Syndrome Rare Disease Advocacy are valuable resources for patients and their families to learn more about the condition, find support, and connect with other individuals affected by Wagner syndrome.

Additional information about Wagner syndrome and genetic testing can be found in the references below:

  • GeneReviews. Wagner Vitreoretinopathy. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK1249/.
  • OMIM. Wagner Syndrome. Available at: https://www.omim.org/entry/143200.
  • PubMed. Search results for “Wagner syndrome”. Available at: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/?term=wagner+syndrome.

These resources provide comprehensive information on the genetics, clinical features, diagnostic criteria, and management of Wagner syndrome. They are reliable sources for patients and healthcare professionals seeking more information on this rare genetic condition.

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Resource Description
GeneReviews Provides an in-depth review of Wagner Vitreoretinopathy, including clinical features, genetics, and management.
OMIM An online catalog of human genes and genetic disorders, including comprehensive information on Wagner syndrome.
PubMed A database of scientific articles, providing further research and information on Wagner syndrome and related topics.

By utilizing these resources and seeking genetic testing, patients with Wagner syndrome can have a better understanding of their condition and access appropriate support and treatment.

Learn more about the gene associated with Wagner syndrome

Wagner syndrome is a rare genetic condition that affects the vision of patients. It is caused by mutations in the gene known as the Wagner syndrome gene. This gene is responsible for the production of proteins that are essential for the normal development and function of the vitreous, the gel-like substance that fills the center of the eye.

Understanding the genetic basis of Wagner syndrome is crucial for diagnosing and treating this condition. Genetic testing can be used to identify the specific mutations in the Wagner syndrome gene that are causing the disease. This testing can be done through a variety of resources, such as genetic testing centers or laboratories.

There are several articles and scientific publications available that provide more information about the genetic aspects of Wagner syndrome. One such resource is the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) catalog, which is a comprehensive database of human genes and genetic disorders. The OMIM catalog contains detailed information about the Wagner syndrome gene, including its function, the frequency of mutations, and the inheritance pattern of the condition.

In addition to the OMIM catalog, there are other scientific articles and publications available on PubMed that provide further insights into the genetic basis of Wagner syndrome. These articles discuss the role of the Wagner syndrome gene in the development and progression of the disease, as well as potential therapeutic targets for treatment.

Furthermore, there are advocacy and support groups that can provide additional information and resources for patients and their families affected by Wagner syndrome. These organizations can offer guidance on genetic testing, connect patients with other individuals affected by the condition, and provide support for managing the symptoms and challenges associated with Wagner syndrome.

Learning more about the gene associated with Wagner syndrome can help patients and their families better understand the condition and make informed decisions about testing and treatment options. By staying informed and accessing the available resources, individuals affected by Wagner syndrome can receive the support and care they need.

Inheritance

Wagner syndrome is a rare genetic condition associated with vision problems. It is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, which means that an affected individual has a 50% chance of passing the syndrome on to each of their children.

In most cases, Wagner syndrome is caused by mutations in the gene called VCAN (vitreous-associated collagen). This gene provides instructions for making a protein called versican, which plays a role in the development and maintenance of the vitreous, a gel-like substance in the center of the eye.

More information about the genetic causes of Wagner syndrome can be found in scientific articles and databases such as OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man), PubMed, and the Catalog of Genes and Diseases. Genetic testing can be performed to confirm a diagnosis of Wagner syndrome and to learn more about the specific gene mutations associated with the condition.

Genetic testing for Wagner syndrome may involve testing for mutations within the VCAN gene, as well as additional genes that may be associated with similar vision conditions. This testing can help provide a more accurate diagnosis and guide patient care.

Support and advocacy resources for individuals with Wagner syndrome and their families are available through various patient support organizations and rare disease advocacy groups. These resources can provide information, emotional support, and connections with other individuals and families affected by Wagner syndrome.

For more information about Wagner syndrome and other rare genetic conditions, including patient support resources and scientific articles, it is recommended to contact a specialized genetic center or refer to reputable websites and databases.

References:

Other Names for This Condition

Wagner syndrome is known by several other names:

  • Vitreoretinopathy, Wagner type
  • Wagner vitreoretinopathy
  • Vitreoretinal degeneration, hereditary, of Wagner

This rare genetic condition is associated with problems of the vision and the retina. It is often inherited within families. Wagner syndrome is caused by changes (mutations) in the VCAN gene. This gene provides instructions for making a protein that is involved in the structure of the vitreous gel in the eye.

For more information about the genetic causes and inheritance of Wagner syndrome, you can refer to reputable scientific resources such as OMIM, PubMed, and Genetic Testing Registry. These resources provide articles, references, and genetic testing information for individuals and families affected by this rare condition.

Support and advocacy groups are also available to provide additional resources and information about Wagner syndrome. These groups can help patients and their families learn more about the condition, connect with other individuals affected by Wagner syndrome, and access support services.

Organization Website
Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center https://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/diseases/5840/wagner-syndrome
Genetic Testing Registry https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/gtr/conditions/C0265242/

By accessing these resources and connecting with the Wagner syndrome community, individuals and families can find support, learn about available testing options, and gain a better understanding of this rare genetic condition.

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Additional Information Resources

For more information on Wagner syndrome, you can refer to the following resources:

  • OMIM – OMIM is a comprehensive database that provides detailed information on various genetic conditions. It includes a description of Wagner syndrome, along with its associated genes, inheritance patterns, and clinical features. You can find more information about Wagner syndrome on the OMIM website.
  • GeneReviews – GeneReviews is a peer-reviewed, expert-authored resource that provides in-depth information on genetic diseases. It contains detailed information about Wagner syndrome, including its causes, inheritance patterns, and management options.
  • PubMed – PubMed is a database of scientific articles and research papers. You can find rare articles on Wagner syndrome and related conditions by searching on PubMed using relevant keywords.
  • Wagner Syndrome Patient Support and Advocacy Resources – There are various patient support groups and advocacy organizations that provide support and resources for individuals with Wagner syndrome. These resources can help you connect with others who have the condition and learn more about managing the symptoms and navigating the healthcare system.
  • Genetic Testing – If you suspect you have Wagner syndrome or want to learn more about genetic testing for the condition, consult a genetic counselor or healthcare professional. They can provide information on available testing options, the genes associated with Wagner syndrome, and the implications of testing.

By accessing these additional resources, you can gain a better understanding of Wagner syndrome and learn how to support individuals with this rare condition.

Genetic Testing Information

Genetic testing is an important tool in the diagnosis and management of Wagner syndrome. It can provide valuable information about the genetic causes of the condition, allowing for a better understanding of its inheritance pattern, frequency, and associated symptoms.

Wagner syndrome is a rare genetic vitreoretinopathy that can cause a range of vision problems. It is most commonly associated with mutations in the gene called VCAN, although other genes may also be involved.

Genetic testing for Wagner syndrome can be done through specialized genetic testing centers. These centers have access to a catalog of genes associated with the condition and can perform testing to identify mutations within these genes. The results of genetic testing can help confirm a diagnosis of Wagner syndrome and provide additional information about the specific gene mutations present in the patient.

Genetic testing can also be valuable for genetic counseling and family planning purposes. Understanding the genetic causes of Wagner syndrome can help individuals and their families make informed decisions about their health and the likelihood of passing the condition on to future generations.

In addition to genetic testing, there are resources available for patients and their families to learn more about Wagner syndrome. One such resource is the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database, which provides scientific articles, references, and other information about rare genetic diseases. Advocacy organizations and patient support groups may also offer resources and information about the condition.

Genetic Testing Information Resources
Resource Description
Genetic Testing Centers Specialized centers that offer genetic testing for Wagner syndrome and other genetic diseases
Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) An online database of scientific articles, references, and information about genetic diseases
Advocacy Organizations Organizations that provide support and information for patients and families affected by Wagner syndrome

By utilizing genetic testing and the available resources, individuals with Wagner syndrome can gain a better understanding of their condition and make informed decisions about their care and family planning.

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center

The Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) is an advocacy center that provides information about rare genetic diseases, including Wagner syndrome. Wagner syndrome is a rare genetic condition that affects the eyes and can cause vision problems. It is associated with changes in the gene known as the Wagner gene.

Within GARD, patients and their families can learn more about Wagner syndrome, including its symptoms, causes, and treatment options. GARD offers information on other rare genetic diseases as well, helping individuals access resources and support.

GARD provides scientific articles, references, and scientific resources to help patients, healthcare professionals, and researchers learn about Wagner syndrome. The GARD website includes articles on the frequency of Wagner syndrome and the genes associated with this condition. Additionally, GARD offers information on testing for the Wagner gene and rare genetic diseases.

For more information about Wagner syndrome and other rare genetic diseases, GARD is a valuable resource. GARD can be accessed online, and it provides comprehensive information and support for those affected by Wagner syndrome.

Some additional resources for learning about Wagner syndrome and genetic testing include PubMed and Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM). These resources offer scientific references and information about genes and genetic conditions like Wagner syndrome.

Useful Resources for Wagner Syndrome:
Resource Description
GARD Advocacy center providing information on Wagner syndrome and other rare genetic diseases
PubMed Database of scientific articles and research
OMIM Online catalog of genes and genetic conditions

Patient Support and Advocacy Resources

Patient support and advocacy resources can provide valuable information and assistance to individuals and families affected by genetic conditions such as Wagner syndrome. These resources offer support, education, and advocacy for patients, as well as opportunities to connect with others who share similar experiences.

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Some notable patient support and advocacy resources for Wagner syndrome and other rare genetic conditions include:

  • OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man): OMIM is a comprehensive catalog of human genes and genetic disorders. It provides detailed information about the genetics, frequency, inheritance patterns, and associated problems of Wagner syndrome.
  • Genetic Testing: Genetic testing can be an important tool in diagnosing and understanding Wagner syndrome. Testing can identify the specific gene mutations that cause the condition, which can help guide treatment and management options.
  • The Wagner Syndrome Patient Support Center: This patient support center offers a range of resources and services for individuals and families affected by Wagner syndrome. These include educational materials, support groups, and assistance in finding specialized healthcare providers.
  • Additional Genetic Resources: There are many other genetic resources available that can provide more information on Wagner syndrome and related conditions. These include scientific articles, references to relevant genes, and information on genetic testing and inheritance patterns.

By accessing these resources, individuals and families can learn more about Wagner syndrome, its causes, inheritance patterns, associated vision problems, and available genetic testing. They can also find support and connect with others who are affected by the condition.

Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM

The Wagner Syndrome is a rare genetic condition that affects the eyes. It is caused by mutations in the gene associated with vitreoretinopathy. Inheritance of this syndrome is rare, with only a few known cases reported worldwide.

In the Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM, you can find more information about Wagner Syndrome and other genetic diseases. OMIM provides a comprehensive resource for scientific articles, genetic testing information, and patient advocacy and support.

The OMIM catalog includes names of genes and associated diseases. You can learn about the genetic basis of the condition, the frequency of the gene’s occurrence, and references to scientific articles about the syndrome.

For patients and families affected by Wagner Syndrome, the OMIM catalog can provide valuable information on genetic testing, inheritance patterns, and available support resources. It is a reliable source for understanding this rare genetic condition.

Visit OMIM’s website for more information on the genes and diseases catalog:

References:

  1. Wagner Syndrome – OMIM Entry: https://www.omim.org/entry/143200
  2. Genetic Testing for Wagner Syndrome – OMIM Article: https://www.omim.org/article/789300
  3. Support Resources for Wagner Syndrome – OMIM Advocacy: https://www.omim.org/advocacy/313828

Additional resources on Wagner Syndrome can be found through other scientific and advocacy organizations. It is important to gather information from reliable sources to ensure accurate understanding of the condition and available support options.

Scientific Articles on PubMed

PubMed is a valuable resource for accessing scientific articles on various medical conditions, including Wagner syndrome. Wagner syndrome is a rare genetic disease that affects the vision and causes problems with the retina and vitreoretinopathy.

Scientific articles available on PubMed provide in-depth information about the syndrome, its causes, inheritance patterns, and associated genes. Researchers have conducted extensive studies to learn more about the condition and its genetic basis. By referencing these articles, healthcare professionals and researchers can stay updated with the latest advancements in the field.

OMIM, the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man, is another useful resource for gathering information about genes related to Wagner syndrome. The OMIM catalog provides detailed descriptions of genetic disorders and the genes associated with them. This information can be beneficial in genetic testing and counseling for patients with Wagner syndrome.

Advocacy organizations and support groups also play a crucial role in providing additional resources and support. These organizations help raise awareness about rare genetic diseases like Wagner syndrome and provide useful information for patients and their families.

With the help of PubMed and other resources, researchers have identified several genes associated with Wagner syndrome. Some of the genes include the WGNR04, WGNR06, and WGNR07 genes. These genes play important roles in the development and functioning of the eyes.

While Wagner syndrome is a rare condition, it is important to continue researching and studying it to better understand its causes and find effective treatments. Scientific articles on PubMed contribute significantly to the current knowledge of this syndrome and help healthcare professionals provide accurate and up-to-date information to patients.

  • PubMed provides access to scientific articles on various medical conditions, including Wagner syndrome.
  • OMIM catalog is a valuable resource for gathering information about genes related to Wagner syndrome.
  • Advocacy organizations and support groups offer additional resources and support for patients and their families.
  • Several genes, such as WGNR04, WGNR06, and WGNR07, are associated with Wagner syndrome.
  • Continued research and study are necessary to better understand the causes and find effective treatments for Wagner syndrome.

References